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Housing Is Working Group 2023-2024 Calendar

Join the Housing Is Working Group to discuss special topics related to cross-sector initiatives and programmatic considerations particularly focused on the intersections of housing, health, and education.

This year’s public webinars cover topics such as the mobility asthma project, trauma-informed approaches to housing, resident-focused racial equity work, out-of-school time, and how FCC grantees are supprting voucher holders.

View Calendar
 

Elements of a Successful Partnership

With generous support from the MacArthur Foundation, CLPHA developed an in-depth report on regional housing-education collaborations taking place at housing authorities across the Pacific-Northwest.

Read the Multimedia Report
 
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Publication
Community:
Feb 28, 2019
This brief presents a new approach to support the development of early math skills in young children. The approach synthesizes the influence of parents, home environment, and children’s health care providers. The brief draws on research to explain (1) why it is important to support early math development, (2) what early math is (and isn’t), (3) how early math and literacy development intertwine, and (4) the important role parents play in their child’s development. The brief ends with a description of a promising approach to support early childhood math development that leverages communication between parents and health care providers and book sharing during well-child primary care visits.

Authored by: Mathematica Policy Research
Topics: Child welfare, Early childhood, Education, Health, Literacy, Partnerships
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 18, 2019
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Research
Community:
Jan 25, 2019
The employment social enterprise (ESE) model can provide an opportunity to create a financially viable business that helps individuals with employment barriers become integrated into the labor force. This research studied eight ESEs. Findings suggest that by applying private‐sector business principles to a workforce development programs, social enterprises can provide participants with meaningful and valuable work experience, while offsetting program costs. Analysis identified four promising practices that social entrepreneurs should adopt when setting up a new enterprise. Enterprises should (a) provide soft‐skill training and social services to participants; (b) operate at a size that allows for economies of scale in production and the provision of support services; (c) have few occupational skill requirements; and (d) hire supervisors with both industry knowledge and the capacity to support individuals with employment barriers.

Authored by: Mathematica Policy Research
Topics: Asset building, Low-income, Research, Workforce development
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 18, 2019

Doing Good While Doing Business Using Financial Viability to Enhance Employability for the Disadvantaged

Research
Jan 25, 2019
Mathematica Policy Research
The employment social enterprise (ESE) model can provide an opportunity to create a financially viable business that helps individuals with employment barriers become integrated into the labor force. This research studied eight ESEs.
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Research
Community:
Nov 19, 2018
With persistent concerns about health care expenditures, the health care field has recognized a group of patients known as super utilizers—people with complex health needs and socioeconomic challenges who have very high levels of hospital use. A well-publicized team-based care management model to address the needs of these patients is the hotspotting model pioneered by the Camden Coalition of Healthcare Providers in New Jersey, first brought to national attention by an article in the New Yorker in 2011. So far, interest in programs to help super utilizers has outpaced the available evidence on their effectiveness.

Authored by: Mathematica Policy Research
Topics: Health, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 18, 2019

High-Intensity Care Management Program Shows Promise for Reducing Hospital Use and Spending for Super Utilizers

Research
Nov 19, 2018
Mathematica Policy Research
With persistent concerns about health care expenditures, the health care field has recognized a group of patients known as super utilizers—people with complex health needs and socioeconomic challenges who have very high levels of hospital use.
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Research
Community:
Strengthening primary care is critical to promoting health and reducing costs in the United States. Comprehensive Primary Care Plus, or CPC+, is an advanced alternative payment model for primary care that builds on the foundation of the Comprehensive Primary Care initiative, implemented by the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Innovation from 2012 through 2016. The evaluation is assessing whether CPC+ achieves improved quality, reduced expenditures, and better health for Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries in thousands of primary care practices using a mixed methods study. We are analyzing claims data; survey and qualitative interviews with patients, primary care practitioners, practice staff, practices, and payers; and program data.

Authored by: Mathematica Policy Research
Topics: Health, Medicaid / Medicare, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 18, 2019
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Interactive
Community:
The NQP Social Determinants of Health Data Integration Action Team brings together experts and recognized leaders from the private and public sectors committed to accelerating the integration of data on social determinants of health (SDOH) into clinical practice. Through a series of web meetings and one in-person forum, the NQP Social Determinants of Health Data Integration Action Team Action Team will develop and share successful approaches to integrating SDOH data to support providers and communities in their efforts to eliminate disparities.

Authored by: National Quality Forum
Topics: Data sharing, Health, Partnerships, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 18, 2019
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Research
Community:
Feb 28, 2019
Findings from a national descriptive study of Early Head Start-Child Care Partnerships reveal new information about how partnerships expand access to high quality, affordable care for infants and toddlers. The study describes characteristics of these partnerships, including how they were formed and operated, as well as strategies for implementing partnerships in both center-based child care and family child care homes. It also describes the wide range of services that partnerships offer to children and families who receive care through Early Head Start-Child Care Partnership grant funds. Lessons learned from this study can inform ongoing and future activities of partnerships in early care and education programs as well as training and technical assistance efforts.

Authored by: Del Grosso, Thomas, Makowsky, Levere, Fung, and Paulsell for Department of Health and Human Services
Topics: Child welfare, Early childhood, Low-income, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 15, 2019

Working Together for Children and Families: Findings from the National Descriptive Study of Early Head Start-Child Care Partnerships

Research
Feb 28, 2019
Del Grosso, Thomas, Makowsky, Levere, Fung, and Paulsell for Department of Health and Human Services
Findings from a national descriptive study of Early Head Start-Child Care Partnerships reveal new information about how partnerships expand access to high quality, affordable care for infants and toddlers.
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News Article
Community:
Mar 15, 2019
Although such a complex problem such as lack of affordable housing demands numerous solutions, modular construction looks promising, barreling toward a tipping point with a new generation of startups bringing a manufacturing mindset to multifamily construction.

Authored by: Matt Alderton for Arch Daily
Topics: Community development, Cost effectiveness, Housing, Low-income
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 15, 2019

How Modular Construction Could Offer a Lasting Solution in the Affordable Housing Crisis

News Article
Mar 15, 2019
Matt Alderton for Arch Daily
Although such a complex problem such as lack of affordable housing demands numerous solutions, modular construction looks promising, barreling toward a tipping point with a new generation of startups bringing a manufacturing mindset to multifamily construction.
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News Article
Community:
Mar 15, 2019
The venture is a small yet innovative player in a growing number of nonprofits developing new models for work force training. Their overarching goal is upward mobility for low-income Americans and the two-thirds of workers without four-year college degrees.

Authored by: Steve Lohr for The New York Times
Topics: Asset building, Broadband, Low-income, Workforce development
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 15, 2019

Income Before: $18,000. After: $85,000. Does Tiny Nonprofit Hold a Key to the Middle Class?

News Article
Mar 15, 2019
Steve Lohr for The New York Times
The venture is a small yet innovative player in a growing number of nonprofits developing new models for work force training. Their overarching goal is upward mobility for low-income Americans and the two-thirds of workers without four-year college degrees.
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Research
Community:
The U.S. has a shortage of seven million rental homes affordable and available to extremely low-income renters, whose household incomes are at or below the poverty guideline or 30% of their area median income. Only 37 affordable and available rental homes exist for every 100 extremely low-income renter households. Extremely low-income renters face a shortage in every state and major metropolitan area, including the District of Columbia. Among states, the supply of affordable and available rental homes ranges from only 19 for every 100 extremely low-income renter households in Nevada to 66 in Wyoming. Among the 50 largest metropolitan areas in the U.S, the supply ranges from 13 affordable and available rental homes for every 100 extremely low-income renter households in Orlando, FL to 51 in Pittsburgh, PA.

Authored by: National Low Income Housing Coalition
Topics: Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Mar 14, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Mar 12, 2019
The proposed bill follows an NBC News investigation that found at least 11 public housing residents had died of carbon monoxide poisoning since 2003.

Authored by: Suzy Khimm for NBC News
Topics: Funding, Health, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Safety
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Mar 14, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Mar 11, 2019
The Trump administration released its budget proposal today for fiscal year 2020, and like its previous budget requests for 2017, 2018, and 2019, the administration is proposing steep cuts to both the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the Department of Transportation (DoT).

Authored by: Jeff Andrews for Curbed
Topics: Funding, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Transportation
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Mar 14, 2019

Trump administration proposes dramatic cuts to public housing - again

News Article
Mar 11, 2019
Jeff Andrews for Curbed
The Trump administration released its budget proposal today for fiscal year 2020, and like its previous budget requests for 2017, 2018, and 2019, the administration is proposing steep cuts to both the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the Department of Transportation (DoT).
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News Article
Community:
Mar 12, 2019
Kaiser is investing $200 million in low-interest loans for affordable housing nationwide. This may be part of a growing national trend of health maintenance organizations investing in housing to improve community health. In Phoenix, United Healthcare lent money to a community development corporation, Chicanos Por La Causa, to purchase apartment complexes for Medicaid recipients. In Chicago, the University of Illinois Hospital helps to find permanent housing for homeless people who regularly present at its emergency department.

Authored by: Raquel Maria Dillon for Market Place
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Community development, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Partnerships, West Coast
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Mar 14, 2019
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Research
Community:
Feb 5, 2019
Housing is considered a social determinant of health, with poor housing conditions being associated with poor health. Veterans with disabilities are more likely to experience a housing crisis because of combat experiences and employment instability. We identified facilitators and barriers to finding and maintaining rental housing. We sought to understand the housing needs of Veterans with military-related disabilities using the biopsychoecological model (BEM) as an organizing framework.

Authored by: Semeah, Ahrentzen, Cowper-Ripley, Santos-Roman, Beamish, and Farley for Housing Policy Debate
Topics: Disabilities, Funding, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Research, Safety, Seniors, Stability
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 14, 2019

In Their Own Words: Veterans with Disabilities Share Their Housing Challenges

Research
Feb 5, 2019
Semeah, Ahrentzen, Cowper-Ripley, Santos-Roman, Beamish, and Farley for Housing Policy Debate
Housing is considered a social determinant of health, with poor housing conditions being associated with poor health. Veterans with disabilities are more likely to experience a housing crisis because of combat experiences and employment instability.
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Case study
Community:
Mar 13, 2019
Vacant properties, substandard housing, and neighborhood quality profoundly affect our health, education, and safety. Strategic code enforcement programs can serve as communities’ first line of defense for addressing deteriorating homes, vacant properties, and neighborhood decline. Strategic code enforcement programs organize critical assets, resources, and actions into a dynamic and adaptive system.

Authored by: Joe Schilling for How Housing Matters (Urban Institute)
Topics: Community development, Data sharing, Funding, Health, Legislation & Policy, Partnerships
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 14, 2019

Stabilizing Neighborhoods through Strategic Code Enforcement

Case study
Mar 13, 2019
Joe Schilling for How Housing Matters (Urban Institute)
Vacant properties, substandard housing, and neighborhood quality profoundly affect our health, education, and safety. Strategic code enforcement programs can serve as communities’ first line of defense for addressing deteriorating homes, vacant properties, and neighborhood decline.
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Report
Community:
Mar 1, 2019
The #RealCollege survey is the nation’s largest annual assessment of basic needs security among college students. The survey, which specifically evaluates access to affordable food and housing, began in 2015 under the Wisconsin HOPE Lab. This report describes the results of the #RealCollege survey administered at nearly half of the schools in the California Community College system in the fall of 2016 and 2018.

Authored by: The Hope Center, California Community Colleges, and #RealCollege
Topics: Homelessness, Low-income, Post-secondary, Research, West Coast, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 13, 2019
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Interactive
Community:
On behalf of All In: Data for Community Health, Data Across Sectors for Health (DASH) is conducting The 2019 National Inventory of Data Sharing Collaborations for Health to better understand the location and nature of multi-sector collaborations in the United States, their capacity for data-sharing to improve health, and to assess progress in this field among multi-sector collaborations. Your participation in The National Inventory will also help us identify areas for further learning and opportunities to support and expand these activities. All In: Data for Community Health is a learning network of communities that are testing exciting new ways to systematically improve community health outcomes through multi-sector collaborations using shared data.

Authored by: All In: Data for Community Health
Topics: Data sharing, Health, Partnerships, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 13, 2019

2019 National Inventory of Data Sharing Collaborations for Health

Interactive
All In: Data for Community Health
On behalf of All In: Data for Community Health, Data Across Sectors for Health (DASH) is conducting The 2019 National Inventory of Data Sharing Collaborations for Health to better understand the location and nature of multi-sector collaborations in the United States, their capacity for data-sharing
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Publication
Community:
Feb 15, 2019
Last month, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors voted unanimously to dedicate $5 million to preventing housing discrimination and to develop an ordinance to protect housing choice voucher holders from source of income discrimination. The supervisors have until May to draft the ordinance’s language and have not yet developed a timeline for enacting it, but these actions are a step toward expanding voucher holders’ housing options.

Authored by: Alyse Oneto, Martha Galvez, and Claudia Aranda for Urban Institute
Topics: Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Racial inequalities, West Coast
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 13, 2019

Los Angeles County is taking steps to prevent discrimination against housing voucher holders

Publication
Feb 15, 2019
Alyse Oneto, Martha Galvez, and Claudia Aranda for Urban Institute
Last month, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors voted unanimously to dedicate $5 million to preventing housing discrimination and to develop an ordinance to protect housing choice voucher holders from source of income discrimination.
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News Article
Community:
Feb 25, 2019
Increasing numbers of young Americans are unfit for military service. So why is the Trump administration rolling back nutrition standards?

Authored by: Dan Glickman for Roll Call
Topics: Child welfare, Food insecurity, Legislation & Policy, Nutrition, Obesity
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Mar 12, 2019
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Podcast
Community:
Feb 26, 2019
Many are wondering how engaged President Trump actually is on one of his campaign issues: revitalizing the nation’s crumbling infrastructure. Eyes are turning back to Congress for a broad infrastructure package. Yet there is an even bigger issue of the looming insolvency of the Highway Trust Fund. BPC’s Jake Varn is joined by former Reps. Bill Shuster (R-PA) and Joe Crowley(D-NY) to discuss these issues.

Authored by: Bipartisan Policy Center
Topics: Community development, Funding, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Transportation
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Mar 12, 2019

The Infrastructure Debate - Infrastructure and Congress

Podcast
Feb 26, 2019
Bipartisan Policy Center
Many are wondering how engaged President Trump actually is on one of his campaign issues: revitalizing the nation’s crumbling infrastructure. Eyes are turning back to Congress for a broad infrastructure package. Yet there is an even bigger issue of the looming insolvency of the Highway Trust Fund.
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Research
Community:
The lead article, “Landlords: Critical Participants in the Housing Choice Voucher Program,” provides a basic overview of the HCV program and the role that landlords play in it; examines the implications of voucher acceptance for assisted households; surveys existing research on landlord participation; and provides examples of the types of program and initiatives that HUD, PHAs, and local governments are pursuing to increase voucher acceptance. The Research Spotlight, “HUD-Sponsored Research Sheds New Light on HCV Landlords,” by Meena Bavan and Paul Joice, discusses the findings of two recent HUD-sponsored studies, “A Pilot Study of Landlord Acceptance of Housing Choice Vouchers,” and “Urban Landlords and the Housing Choice Voucher Program: A Research Report.” Finally, the In Practice article, “PHAs Encourage Landlord Participation With Incentives,” discusses initiatives in Marin County, California, and Cambridge, Massachusetts, that offer financial benefits, education, and streamlined administrative processes to encourage landlords to lease to voucher holders.

Authored by: HUD, Office of Policy Development and Research
Topics: Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Mar 12, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Mar 7, 2019
Democrats this week announced new legislation that would slash child poverty by paying low-income parents the kind of monthly allowance that is standard in other developed countries. But the lawmakers who introduced the bill, called the American Family Act, didn’t use the terms “child benefit” or “child allowance” at their Capitol Hill press conference Wednesday. Instead, they all called it a tax credit or a tax cut.

Authored by: Arthur Delaney for HuffPost
Topics: Child welfare, Dual-generation, Early childhood, Funding, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 12, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Feb 28, 2019
Child poverty in the U.S. could be cut in half over the next 10 years with a few simple steps, according to a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine. The cost would be high — at least $90 billion a year. But the National Academies report warns that the price of not doing anything would be far greater.

Authored by: Pam Fessler for NPR
Topics: Child welfare, Criminal justice, Early childhood, Education, Food insecurity, Funding, Health, Immigrants, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Nutrition, Racial inequalities
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 12, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Feb 5, 2019
We beef up law enforcement to attack crime, devote more funding to try and improve inadequate schools and tackle health disparities by getting more people to the doctor. But what if Baltimore could solve all of its persistent social problems by getting rid of poverty?

Authored by: Baltimore Sun Editorial Board for The Baltimore Sun
Topics: Asset building, Criminal justice, Funding, Health, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Mental health
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 11, 2019

What if we just focused on poverty to solve the city's issues?

News Article
Feb 5, 2019
Baltimore Sun Editorial Board for The Baltimore Sun
We beef up law enforcement to attack crime, devote more funding to try and improve inadequate schools and tackle health disparities by getting more people to the doctor. But what if Baltimore could solve all of its persistent social problems by getting rid of poverty?
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Research
Community:
Jul 21, 2018
A new study measured the mental health of Philadelphia residents before and after blighted lots had been converted into green spaces.

Authored by: Melissa Breyer for treehugger
Topics: Community development, Health, Mental health, Place-based, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 11, 2019
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Report
Community:
These Principles are derived from a thematic review of mission statements and principles from 35 organizations representing the community development, health, academic, government, finance, and philanthropic sectors. More than 200 respondents provided over 1,800 comments which helped refine the Principles below.

Authored by: Build Healthy Places Network
Topics: Community development, Health, Housing, Partnerships, Racial inequalities
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 11, 2019