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5th Annual Housing Is Summit on May 16-17

On May 16-17, over 300 practitioners, policymakers, executives, and researchers gathered in Washington, D.C., for CLPHA’s fifth annual Housing Is Summit, an event highlighting collaboration among the housing, education, and health sectors.

View Summit session summaries and video recordings
 

Elements of a Successful Partnership

With generous support from the MacArthur Foundation, CLPHA developed an in-depth report on regional housing-education collaborations taking place at housing authorities across the Pacific-Northwest.

Read the Multimedia Report
 

National Snapshot of PHA-Health Partnerships

The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) provides new data about public housing authorities’ partnerships with the health sector and offers recommendations to encourage collaboration between these affordable housing providers and their health system partners.

Read the Report
 

Housing Is Summit 2019: Keynote Recap

Day Two of this year's Housing Is Summit began with an electrifying keynote by Dr. Camara Jones, a renowned epidemiologist and public health leader, who talked about the role of "social determinants of inequity" as they relate to health disparities and disparities in other key outcomes. 

View summary and video recording of Dr. Jones' keynote.
 
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Research
Community:
Apr 1, 2019
Serious mental illness (SMI) is a disabling condition that develops early in life and imposes substantial economic burden. There is a growing belief that early intervention for SMI has lifelong benefits for patients. However, assessing the cost-effectiveness of early intervention efforts is hampered by a lack of evidence on the long-term benefits. We addressed this by using a dynamic microsimulation model to estimate the lifetime burden of SMI for those diagnosed by age twenty-five.

Authored by: Health Affairs
Topics: Disabilities, Education, Low-income, Mental health, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 23, 2019

Measuring The Lifetime Costs of Serious Mental Illness And The Mitigating Effects of Educational Attainment

Research
Apr 1, 2019
Health Affairs
Serious mental illness (SMI) is a disabling condition that develops early in life and imposes substantial economic burden. There is a growing belief that early intervention for SMI has lifelong benefits for patients.
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Publication
Community:
Apr 11, 2019
High-need, high-cost (HNHC) individuals are defined as people of all ages living with clinically complex needs and functional limitations who also incur high health care costs or are likely to do so in the near future. Despite frequent contact with the health care system and substantial medical spending, the physical, social, and behavioral health needs of these individuals often remain unmet due to uncoordinated and fragmented care. Studies suggest that HNHC individuals could benefit from a more holistic approach that coordinates the care they receive and addresses their unmet social needs. Doing so could improve quality of care and quality of life while reducing health care service use

Authored by: Janet Niles, Teresa Litton, and Robert Mechanic for Health Affairs
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Disabilities, Health, Research, Seniors
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 11, 2019

An Initial Assessment of Initiatives to Improve Care for High-Need, High-Cost Individuals in Accountable Care Organizations

Publication
Apr 11, 2019
Janet Niles, Teresa Litton, and Robert Mechanic for Health Affairs
High-need, high-cost (HNHC) individuals are defined as people of all ages living with clinically complex needs and functional limitations who also incur high health care costs or are likely to do so in the near future.
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Publication
Community:
All too often technology is blamed for the obesity crisis which is currently affecting 1.9 billion adults and 31.5 million children across the globe. However, for individuals with mobility issues caused by their weight, technology is far from a hindrance. The following innovative pieces of technology are making life easier for people with restricted mobility both in and out of their homes: wearable technology, smart home technology, assistive everyday technology, IoT devices, smart cities, self-driving vehicles.With so much amazing technology on offer, people are no longer restricted to just one room in their home. This is a great thing as independence in and out of the home promotes emotional well-being and also increases the dignity and quality of life that people with restricted mobility have. You can find out more about how technology can aid mobility in this useful guide.

Authored by: Jane Sandwood and Movement Advisor
Topics: Broadband, Disabilities, Obesity
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 27, 2019
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Interactive
Community:
Mar 20, 2019
As the population ages, one of the greatest challenges facing state officials is how to organize and pay for long-term services and supports (LTSS) for low-income elderly and disabled adults—the most complex, expensive, and fastest-growing group covered by Medicaid. To help address this challenge, a toolkit for state leaders published in 2017 has been updated.

Authored by: Manatt Health Strategies and PhD Center for Health Care Strategies
Topics: Disabilities, Health, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Partnerships, Seniors
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 26, 2019

Strengthening Medicaid Long-Term Services and Supports in an Evolving Policy Environment: A Toolkit for States

Interactive
Mar 20, 2019
Manatt Health Strategies and PhD Center for Health Care Strategies
As the population ages, one of the greatest challenges facing state officials is how to organize and pay for long-term services and supports (LTSS) for low-income elderly and disabled adults—the most complex, expensive, and fastest-growing group covered by Medicaid.
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Research
Community:
Jan 31, 2019
Because mental health conditions can negatively affect employment, people with these conditions make up a large share of federal disability program participants. Federal agencies have tested supported employment (SE) interventions designed to help those with mental health conditions keep or obtain employment and reduce their dependence on public programs. This brief describes the characteristics of adults with mental health conditions who participate in the federal disability programs and reports evidence from three recent studies of longer-term impacts of SE on the employment of people with mental health conditions. The findings indicate that, although a large share of disability program participants with mental health conditions report that they want to work, many face barriers, including being discouraged by failed past work attempts.

Authored by: Mathematica Policy Research
Topics: Asset building, Disabilities, Mental health, Research, Workforce development
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 18, 2019
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Research
Community:
Dec 31, 2018
The Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program is an important, means-tested source of income for the families of children with disabilities. Although some research has shown that SSI improves outcomes for these families, policymakers have been concerned about the program’s growth and the poor outcomes that many former child SSI recipients experience in adulthood. In this brief, we summarize research funded by SSA’s Disability Resource Consortium (DRC) on the program’s recent growth and the factors related to receipt of SSI by children. This research reveals dramatic variation in the rate of child SSI receipt at the state and county level, which is partly due to geographic differences in both the population and the economic circumstances that influence program eligibility.

Authored by: Mathematica Policy Research
Topics: Child welfare, Disabilities, Health, Low-income, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 18, 2019
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Research
Community:
Feb 5, 2019
Housing is considered a social determinant of health, with poor housing conditions being associated with poor health. Veterans with disabilities are more likely to experience a housing crisis because of combat experiences and employment instability. We identified facilitators and barriers to finding and maintaining rental housing. We sought to understand the housing needs of Veterans with military-related disabilities using the biopsychoecological model (BEM) as an organizing framework.

Authored by: Semeah, Ahrentzen, Cowper-Ripley, Santos-Roman, Beamish, and Farley for Housing Policy Debate
Topics: Disabilities, Funding, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Research, Safety, Seniors, Stability
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 14, 2019

In Their Own Words: Veterans with Disabilities Share Their Housing Challenges

Research
Feb 5, 2019
Semeah, Ahrentzen, Cowper-Ripley, Santos-Roman, Beamish, and Farley for Housing Policy Debate
Housing is considered a social determinant of health, with poor housing conditions being associated with poor health. Veterans with disabilities are more likely to experience a housing crisis because of combat experiences and employment instability.
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Publication
Community:
Mar 6, 2019
Type the phrase “aging in place” into a Google search, and you’ll likely see pictures of wheelchairs fitting comfortably through home doorways, bathtubs and showers with zero-step entrances, and open floorplans to facilitate seamless movement from room to room. But what is often missed in discussions promoting aging in place is that increasing livability doesn’t just mean adapting a home’s physical characteristics, it also means ensuring a range of cost options and housing types in a single community.

Authored by: Martha Fedorowicz for How Housing Matters
Topics: Disabilities, Health, Housing, Place-based, Seniors
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Mar 7, 2019

How to Promote Aging in Place (Hint: It's More Than Wheelchair Accessibility)

Publication
Mar 6, 2019
Martha Fedorowicz for How Housing Matters
Type the phrase “aging in place” into a Google search, and you’ll likely see pictures of wheelchairs fitting comfortably through home doorways, bathtubs and showers with zero-step entrances, and open floorplans to facilitate seamless movement from room to room.
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Policy Brief
Community:
This annotated resource compilation is intended to help state and local agencies access information and resources needed to better understand the federal legal protections and requirements associated with datasets collected by federal agencies or as part of a federally funded program.

Authored by: The Network for Public Health Law
Topics: Data sharing, Disabilities, Early childhood, Education, Health, Homelessness, Legislation & Policy, Post-secondary
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Feb 20, 2019

Federal Privacy Laws

Policy Brief
The Network for Public Health Law
This annotated resource compilation is intended to help state and local agencies access information and resources needed to better understand the federal legal protections and requirements associated with datasets collected by federal agencies or as part of a federally funded program.
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News Article
Community:
Jan 29, 2019
Housing complex would integrate residents with special needs into the larger community

Authored by: Tara Bahrampour for The Washington Post
Topics: Disabilities, Dual-generation, Housing, Mental health, Place-based, Safety
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 31, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Jan 25, 2019
A whole host of factors — such as friends, housing and transportation — affect a person’s health and how much they need the social safety net. It’s time the government’s big health insurance programs took this reality into account, some lawmakers and policymakers are starting to argue.

Authored by: Paige Winfield Cunningham for The Washington Post
Topics: Asset building, Cost effectiveness, Disabilities, Education, Food insecurity, Funding, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Seniors, Transportation, Workforce development
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 25, 2019

The Health 202: Policymakers are realizing health is about a lot more than just care

News Article
Jan 25, 2019
Paige Winfield Cunningham for The Washington Post
A whole host of factors — such as friends, housing and transportation — affect a person’s health and how much they need the social safety net. It’s time the government’s big health insurance programs took this reality into account, some lawmakers and policymakers are starting to argue.
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News Article
Community:
Jan 8, 2019
SNAP is the first line of defense against senior hunger and frees up funds for health care and housing. This is important because one way struggling seniors often meet rising health care and other costs is by cutting back on or skipping meals — coping strategies that can exacerbate existing health problems. SNAP improves the health and well-being of seniors by reducing the negative health impacts of food insecurity, including diabetes, hypertension and depression.

Authored by: Joey Hentzler for The Topeka Capital-Journal
Topics: Depression, Disabilities, Food insecurity, Health, Housing, Low-income, Mental health, Midwest, Nutrition, Seniors
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 16, 2019
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Case study
Community:
Dec 6, 2018
The Denver Housing Authority (DHA) wins a 2017 Award of Excellence in Client and Resident Services for creating the Health Navigators (HN) program, which provides mental health education, resources, and doctor referrals.

Authored by: Ashanti Wright for Journal of Housing & Community Development
Topics: Disabilities, Health, Housing, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Mental health, Partnerships, Place-based, Seniors
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 21, 2018

Tackling Mental Health

Case study
Dec 6, 2018
Ashanti Wright for Journal of Housing & Community Development
The Denver Housing Authority (DHA) wins a 2017 Award of Excellence in Client and Resident Services for creating the Health Navigators (HN) program, which provides mental health education, resources, and doctor referrals.
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Publication
Community:
Dec 17, 2018
In response to the heightened interest in the relationship between work and the health of individuals and communities, CMCS has clarified that Medicaid funds cannot be used to pay beneficiaries’ wages, but can pay for employment counseling as an optional benefit—to help people get jobs. Years of experience with work requirements for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, Aid to Families with Dependent Children, and populations with disabilities have developed the evidence for what is needed to help different populations find and keep jobs.

Authored by: Christopher F. Koller for Millbank Memorial Fund
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Disabilities, Health, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Research, Stability, Workforce development
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 17, 2018

To Work and To Love—Health in Theory and Practice

Publication
Dec 17, 2018
Christopher F. Koller for Millbank Memorial Fund
In response to the heightened interest in the relationship between work and the health of individuals and communities, CMCS has clarified that Medicaid funds cannot be used to pay beneficiaries’ wages, but can pay for employment counseling as an optional benefit—to help people get jobs.
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Policy Brief
Community:
Dec 3, 2018
Some seniors and people with disabilities receiving home- and community-based services (HCBS) could lose their Medicaid eligibility and have to go into nursing homes to get needed care if Congress adjourns without extending “spousal impoverishment” protections that are set to expire on December 31.

Authored by: Judith Solomon for The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Disabilities, Legislation & Policy, Medicaid / Medicare, Seniors
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 3, 2018

Protections for Married Couples Receiving Medicaid Home- and Community-Based Services End on December 31 Without Congressional Action

Policy Brief
Dec 3, 2018
Judith Solomon for The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
Some seniors and people with disabilities receiving home- and community-based services (HCBS) could lose their Medicaid eligibility and have to go into nursing homes to get needed care if Congress adjourns without extending “spousal impoverishment” protections that are set to expire on December 31.
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Publication
Community:
Nov 20, 2018
People with mental health disabilities are vastly overrepresented in the population of people who experience homelessness. Of the more than 550,000 people in America who experienced homelessness on a given night in 2017, 1 in 5 had a mental illness. The proportion of people experiencing chronic homelessness with mental health disabilities was even higher—nearly 1 in 3. Despite this fact, the reality is that most people with mental illness fortunately do not experience homelessness: While about 20 percent of all adults in the United States have a mental illness, less than two-tenths of 1 percent of people in the country experienced homelessness on a given night in 2017.

Authored by: Heidi Schultheis for Center for American Progress
Topics: Depression, Disabilities, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Mental health, Partnerships, Preventative care, Stability, Substance abuse, Supportive housing
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 20, 2018

Lack of Housing and Mental Health Disabilities Exacerbate One Another

Publication
Nov 20, 2018
Heidi Schultheis for Center for American Progress
People with mental health disabilities are vastly overrepresented in the population of people who experience homelessness. Of the more than 550,000 people in America who experienced homelessness on a given night in 2017, 1 in 5 had a mental illness.
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Report
Community:
Oct 1, 2018
Studies have consistently documented high rates of obesity and tobacco use among individuals with serious mental illness. In recent years, Medicaid programs have enrolled individuals with serious mental illness into managed care plans, which are responsible for ensuring that their members receive preventive care. Despite the movement to managed care, not much is known about whether this population receives routine screening and follow-up care for common comorbid health conditions and health behaviors.

Authored by: Jonathan Brown, Junquing Liu, and Sarah Hudson Scholle for Mathematica
Topics: Disabilities, Health, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Mental health, Preventative care, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 16, 2018

Health Screening and Follow-Up Care Among Medicaid Beneficiaries with Serious Mental Illness Enrolled in Managed Care Plans

Report
Oct 1, 2018
Jonathan Brown, Junquing Liu, and Sarah Hudson Scholle for Mathematica
Studies have consistently documented high rates of obesity and tobacco use among individuals with serious mental illness.
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Webinar
Community:
Nov 14, 2018
In the first session of this series, Foothold Technology Director of Client Services, Paul Rossi and Senior Advisor, David Bucciferro, along with Sue Augustus from CSH, bring us back to basics of all things Medicaid. They cover topics ranging in commonly used terms, coverage and eligibility and the differences between Medicaid and Medicare. This webinar series is designed for beginners and experts alike. Beginners will walk away with a strong foundation and experts will have the opportunity to contribute to the conversation.

Authored by: Foothold Technology and CSH
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Disabilities, Health, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 14, 2018
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Policy Brief
Community:
This short document provides basic information to help housing and homeless assistance providers advocate with their families and youth for appropriate educational services, from birth through higher education. The rights and protections outlined here apply to all children and youth experiencing homelessness, as defined by the education subtitle of the McKinney-Vento Act.

Authored by: SchoolHouse Connection
Topics: Disabilities, Dual-generation, Early childhood, Education, Family engagement, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Post-secondary, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Oct 10, 2018
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Research
Community:
Sep 19, 2018
About 20 percent of adults in sheltered homeless families have a disability, compared with 9 percent of all US adults, yet few studies have addressed the intersection of disability and housing instability. A recent study explored the relationship between disabilities and Supplemental Security Income (SSI)/Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) income that homeless families reported when they entered emergency shelters, as well as later outcomes, such as housing stability, self-sufficiency, and food insecurity. It also examined how housing interventions affect SSI/SSDI income receipt.

Authored by: Urban Institute
Topics: Disabilities, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Research, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 20, 2018
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Policy Brief
Community:
Aug 9, 2018
Everyone needs safe, decent, stable housing. For some of the most vulnerable people in America — people with mental illness, chronic health conditions, histories of trauma, and other struggles — a home helps them to get adequate treatment and start on the path toward recovery. But some conditions make it difficult for people to maintain a stable home without additional help. Supportive housing, a highly effective strategy that combines affordable housing with intensive coordinated services, can provide that needed assistance.

Authored by:
Topics: Cost effectiveness, Disabilities, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Mental health, Place-based, Seniors, Supportive housing
Shared by Housing Is on Aug 9, 2018

Supportive Housing Helps Vulnerable People Live and Thrive in the Community

Policy Brief
Aug 9, 2018
Everyone needs safe, decent, stable housing. For some of the most vulnerable people in America — people with mental illness, chronic health conditions, histories of trauma, and other struggles — a home helps them to get adequate treatment and start on the path toward recovery.
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Policy Brief
Community:
Aug 9, 2018
Social determinants of health are the economic and social conditions that affect health outcomes and are the underlying, contributing factors of health inequities. Examples include housing, educational attainment, employment and the environment.

Authored by:
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Disabilities, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Mental health, Partnerships, Place-based, Substance abuse, Supportive housing
Shared by Housing Is on Aug 9, 2018
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Report
Community:
Aug 1, 2018
Through the hard work of communities around the country, we now have proof of something that we didn’t before—that ending homelessness is achievable. Home, Together builds upon what we have learned from states and communities over time, and lays out the strategies we know we must advance at the federal level in order to support and accelerate state and local progress.

Authored by: United States Interagency Council on Homelessness
Topics: Cost effectiveness, Data sharing, Disabilities, Dual-generation, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Mental health, Partnerships, Preventative care, Racial inequalities, Stability, Substance abuse, Supportive housing
Shared by Housing Is on Aug 7, 2018
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Research
Community:
Aug 1, 2018
Homelessness among children is correlated with developmental delays, fair or poor health, and high healthcare utilization. Associations of homelessness specifically among infants younger than 12 months, however, are unknown. This study evaluates homelessness during infancy as a risk for adverse infant and maternal health and hardship.

Authored by:
Topics: Child welfare, Depression, Disabilities, Dual-generation, Early childhood, Education, Family engagement, Food insecurity, Grade-level proficiency, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Metrics, Partnerships, Pre-natal, Research, School-readiness, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Aug 1, 2018
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Research
Community:
Aug 1, 2018
We sought to learn more about how state- and locally funded rental assistance programs were created, how they are structured, whom they serve, and how they are funded.

Authored by:
Topics: Cost effectiveness, Data sharing, Disabilities, Family engagement, Funding, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Partnerships, Research, Supportive housing
Shared by Housing Is on Aug 1, 2018