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5th Annual Housing Is Summit on May 16-17

On May 16-17, over 300 practitioners, policymakers, executives, and researchers gathered in Washington, D.C., for CLPHA’s fifth annual Housing Is Summit, an event highlighting collaboration among the housing, education, and health sectors.

View Summit session summaries and video recordings
 

Elements of a Successful Partnership

With generous support from the MacArthur Foundation, CLPHA developed an in-depth report on regional housing-education collaborations taking place at housing authorities across the Pacific-Northwest.

Read the Multimedia Report
 

National Snapshot of PHA-Health Partnerships

The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) provides new data about public housing authorities’ partnerships with the health sector and offers recommendations to encourage collaboration between these affordable housing providers and their health system partners.

Read the Report
 

Housing Is Summit 2019: Keynote Recap

Day Two of this year's Housing Is Summit began with an electrifying keynote by Dr. Camara Jones, a renowned epidemiologist and public health leader, who talked about the role of "social determinants of inequity" as they relate to health disparities and disparities in other key outcomes. 

View summary and video recording of Dr. Jones' keynote.
 
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Video
Community:
May 24, 2019
Recent research shows that place matters in economic mobility. Strong neighborhoods and community resources can have long-term impact on educational achievements and earnings. Building off of this research, David Williams from Opportunity Insights will discuss how PHAs are collaborating with researchers to develop and evaluate effective interventions for families with young children.

Authored by: Housing Is, CLPHA
Topics: CLPHA, Mobility, Partnerships, Place-based, Research
Shared by Housing Is on May 24, 2019
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News Article
Community:
May 18, 2019
For more than 85 tenants who call the Mercantile Wharf building home, the future looked dire. The owner of the historic North End building announced they could opt out of a subsidized-housing program, which would allow the landlord to get more than double the rent at market rate — and effectively forcing the low and moderate income residents to move.

Authored by: Milton Valencia for The Boston Globe
Topics: East Coast, Housing, Mobility
Shared by Housing Is on May 23, 2019
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Research
Community:
Mar 28, 2019
Federal safety net programs are intended to protect the most vulnerable Americans—such as the elderly, people with severe disabilities and young children. Housing assistance plays a critical role in the safety net, providing decent, safe, and affordable housing for millions of extremely low-income and vulnerable families—though, because it is not an entitlement like other federal safety net programs, the assistance available falls far short of the need. Housing subsidies free families to spend on other essentials like healthy food, education, and health care.

Authored by: Susan J. Popkin for Journal of Housing & Community Development
Topics: Asset building, Dual-generation, Education, Housing, Mental health, Mobility, Partnerships, Research, Workforce development
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 2, 2019
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Publication
Community:
Mar 27, 2019
Housing is at the epicenter of all opportunities and outcomes. It is the first rung on the ladder to economic opportunity, and a person’s access to opportunity is linked with that of their community. From health, to economic mobility, to educational opportunity, to racial equity, and beyond, housing shapes families and communities.

Authored by: Maya Brennan and Veronica Gaitan for How Housing Matters, The Urban Institute
Topics: Asset building, Education, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Mobility, Racial inequalities
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 28, 2019

To Improve Lives and Expand Opportunities, Recognize the Power of Housing

Publication
Mar 27, 2019
Maya Brennan and Veronica Gaitan for How Housing Matters, The Urban Institute
Housing is at the epicenter of all opportunities and outcomes. It is the first rung on the ladder to economic opportunity, and a person’s access to opportunity is linked with that of their community.
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Podcast
Community:
One out of every 10 young people between the ages of 16 and 24 is neither working nor in school. These “disconnected” young people face an uphill battle finding work and are at risk of economic hardship well into adulthood. Although there are many programs that aim to reconnect young people to education and employment, findings from evaluations of these programs have been mixed. The evidence base has grown substantially in the past several months, though, as studies of three pro­grams — YouthBuild, Year Up, and New York City’s Young Adult Internship Program (YAIP) — have released new findings. MDRC’s Dan Bloom and Cynthia Miller recently wrote a brief that discusses findings from the new studies and their implications for youth programs.

Authored by: MDRC
Topics: Asset building, Low-income, Mobility, Research, Workforce development, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 8, 2019
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Publication
Community:
We can imagine a future where everyone can find and afford a quality home. Where every neighborhood offers a diversity of housing options. And where people up and down the income ladder can enjoy housing security and build wealth through ownership. Achieving this vision requires more than incremental tinkering with today’s market institutions and public policies. It requires bold innovation by changemakers at all levels of government and in the private and nonprofit sectors.

Authored by: Urban Institute
Topics: Housing, Legislation & Policy, Mobility, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Feb 21, 2019

What would it take to ensure quality affordable housing for all in communities of opportunity?

Publication
Urban Institute
We can imagine a future where everyone can find and afford a quality home. Where every neighborhood offers a diversity of housing options. And where people up and down the income ladder can enjoy housing security and build wealth through ownership.
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Report
Community:
Jan 31, 2019
For a very young child, the relationship with a primary caregiver, most often though not exclusively a mother, lays an important psychological foundation for later flourishing. Successful attachment and bonding in the first two years of life predicts healthy later development on a range of fronts, from mental health to educational skills. When bonding and attachment prove difficult, child development is affected. Recent advances in brain science allow this impact to be shown more clearly and more definitively.

Authored by: Richard V. Reeves for Brookings Institution
Topics: Child welfare, Depression, Dual-generation, Early childhood, Health, Low-income, Mental health, Mobility
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Feb 5, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Jan 30, 2019
Housing subsidies are one of the fastest ways to get a homeless person off the street or to prevent someone from becoming homeless in the first place. Federal subsidies — dispensed through Section 8 vouchers and other forms of aid for renters — use public dollars to make up the difference between what a person can afford to pay for an apartment and what landlords typically charge for one. They’re an essential tool to help Los Angeles end its homeless crisis. But there is a problem: A growing number of landlords won’t even considering leasing to tenants with vouchers or other forms of government rental assistance.

Authored by: Editorial Board for The Los Angeles Times
Topics: Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Mobility, West Coast
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 30, 2019
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Policy Brief
Community:
Jan 30, 2019
NLIHC stands ready to work with all members of Congress to seize the opportunity to address the full scope of affordable housing challenges for families with the greatest needs. In the memorandum below, we provide our recommendations on steps Congress can take—whether through an infrastructure spending package, the appropriations process, housing finance reform, or other legislative avenues—to make the critical investments in the affordable housing our nation needs to help the economy, our communities, children and families thrive.

Authored by: National Low Income Housing Coalition
Topics: Child welfare, Community development, Criminal justice, Funding, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Mobility, Racial inequalities, Safety
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 30, 2019
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Publication
Community:
Jan 24, 2019
Affordable housing campaigns are not new, of course, but what is unprecedented and transformative about Opportunity Starts at Home is the scope and diversity of the partners that are joining forces to advocate for more robust and equitable federal housing policies. The campaign is advised by a Steering Committee including leading national organizations representing a wide range of interests that are working shoulder-to-shoulder to solve the affordable housing crisis.

Authored by: Opportunity Starts at Home
Topics: Asset building, Child welfare, CLPHA, Community development, Early childhood, Education, Food insecurity, Funding, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Immigrants, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Mobility, Out-of-school time, Partnerships, Racial inequalities, Safety, Seniors, Stability, Substance abuse, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 24, 2019

Within Reach: Ambitious Federal Solutions to Meet the Housing Needs of the Most Vulnerable People

Publication
Jan 24, 2019
Opportunity Starts at Home
Affordable housing campaigns are not new, of course, but what is unprecedented and transformative about Opportunity Starts at Home is the scope and diversity of the partners that are joining forces to advocate for more robust and equitable federal housing policies.
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Publication
Community:
Safe, affordable housing enables low-income people to climb up the income ladder and achieve the American Dream.

Authored by: Opportunity Starts at Home
Topics: Asset building, Housing, Mobility, Partnerships, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 18, 2019
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News Article
Community:
May 15, 2018
Since federal public housing assistance was first created in 1939 amid the Great Depression, public housing advocates have struggled with how to move low-income families to higher-opportunity neighborhoods, typically defined as neighborhoods with less poverty (though experts argue there are other ways to measure opportunity, including quality of schools and access to public transportation, and KCHA uses a broader “opportunity index” to compare locations). The Moving to Opportunity program, a federal demonstration in the 1990s, documented outcomes of families moving to neighborhoods with lower poverty rates. The program didn’t show immediate health and economic gains at its conclusion, but in 2015, a landmark paper by Raj Chetty and others showed that for children who moved before the age of 13, the economic and social gains were dramatic. Not coincidentally, 12 and younger was the target age for kids participating in the KCHA opportunity moves.

Authored by: Rebecca Gale for Slate
Topics: Child welfare, CLPHA, Early childhood, Education, Mobility, MTW, Pacific Northwest, Partnerships
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 18, 2019

The Seattle Area is Solving on of Housing's Biggest Challenges

News Article
May 15, 2018
Rebecca Gale for Slate
Since federal public housing assistance was first created in 1939 amid the Great Depression, public housing advocates have struggled with how to move low-income families to higher-opportunity neighborhoods, typically defined as neighborhoods with less poverty (though experts argue there are other wa
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Research
Community:
Jan 16, 2019
This study explores the different ways undocumented status is associated with residential decisions and its implications on residential segregation. Drawing on 47 interviews with 20 undocumented-headed Mexican households in Dallas County, Texas, researchers examine the drivers of residential decisionmaking and illustrate the complex trade-offs undocumented households make between neighborhood quality and legal risk.

Authored by: How Housing Matters, Asad L. Asad and Eva Rosen for the Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
Topics: Housing, Immigrants, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Mobility, Racial inequalities, South
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 17, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Jan 6, 2019
According to a new study, the Las Vegas metropolitan area’s share of voucher recipients with children living in low-poverty neighborhoods, one-third, is greater than the share of voucher-affordable rentals located in those same neighborhoods, one-fourth. That’s possible because affordable rentals far outnumber voucher recipients.

Authored by: Michael Scott Davidson for Las Vegas Review-Journal
Topics: Asset building, Education, Housing, Low-income, Mobility, West Coast
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 10, 2019
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Interactive
Community:
Jan 3, 2019
The Housing Choice Voucher Program, the nation’s largest federal rental assistance program, enables families to afford decent, stable housing, avoid homelessness, and make ends meet. This map allows users to examine where voucher-assisted households live in the 50 largest metropolitan areas. Neighborhoods are color-coded according to their poverty rate, score on our opportunity index, share of residents who are people of color, and Home Owners’ Loan Corporation (HOLC) “Residential Security” maps (only available for selected cities).

Authored by: Alicia Mazzara, Brian Knudsen, and Nick Kasprak for Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
Topics: Housing, Mobility, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 7, 2019

Interactive Map: Where Voucher Households Live in the 50 Largest Metropolitan Areas

Interactive
Jan 3, 2019
Alicia Mazzara, Brian Knudsen, and Nick Kasprak for Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
The Housing Choice Voucher Program, the nation’s largest federal rental assistance program, enables families to afford decent, stable housing, avoid homelessness, and make ends meet. This map allows users to examine where voucher-assisted households live in the 50 largest metropolitan areas.
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Report
Community:
Jan 3, 2019
This analysis examines the location of families with children using vouchers in all U.S. metropolitan areas and in the 50 largest metro areas across multiple neighborhood characteristics. Using Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) administrative data and Census Bureau survey data, we compare the location of these families to the location of voucher-affordable units using three measures: neighborhood poverty, an opportunity index, and the share of residents who are people of color.

Authored by: Alicia Mazzara and Brian Knudsen for Center on Budget and Policy Priorities and PRRAC
Topics: Housing, Mobility, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 7, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Jan 3, 2019
But a new study found that in nearly all 50 of America’s biggest metropolitan areas, low-income families using federal housing vouchers remain overly concentrated in impoverished, racially segregated neighborhoods with little opportunity — even with plenty of affordable apartments available in higher income neighborhoods.

Authored by: Tracy Jan for The Washington Post
Topics: Housing, Mobility, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 7, 2019

Housing vouchers mostly move families into impoverished neighborhoods, even when better apartments exist elsewhere

News Article
Jan 3, 2019
Tracy Jan for The Washington Post
But a new study found that in nearly all 50 of America’s biggest metropolitan areas, low-income families using federal housing vouchers remain overly concentrated in impoverished, racially segregated neighborhoods with little opportunity — even with plenty of affordable apartments available in highe
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Research
Community:
Aug 19, 2018
On the 50th anniversary of the Fair Housing Act, there is growing discussion and concern about gentrification. In almost every American city, long-time residents feel increasingly anxious that they will be priced out of their homes and communities, as growing numbers of higher-income, college-educated households opt for downtown neighborhoods. Yet when looking through the lens of fair housing, gentrification also offers a glimmer of hope, as the moves that higher-income, white households make into predominantly minority, lower-income neighborhoods are moves that help to integrate those neighborhoods, at least in the near-term. The key question is whether this integration will last and help to deliver on the promise of the Fair Housing Act to promote and further integrated living. Inverting the famous words of community organizer Saul Alinsky, this integration may only be the time between when the first white moves in and the last family of color moves out.

Authored by: Ingrid Gould Ellen and Gerard Torrats-Espinosa for NYU Furman Center
Topics: Community development, Housing, Low-income, Mobility, Racial inequalities, Research, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 19, 2018
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News Article
Community:
Dec 13, 2018
In a bold move to address its affordable-housing crisis and confront a history of racist housing practices, Minneapolis has decided to eliminate single-family zoning, a classification that has long perpetuated segregation.

Authored by: Sarah Mervosh for The New York Times
Topics: Housing, Legislation & Policy, Midwest, Mobility
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 14, 2018

Minneapolis, Tackling Housing Crisis and Inequity, Votes to End Single-Family Zoning

News Article
Dec 13, 2018
Sarah Mervosh for The New York Times
In a bold move to address its affordable-housing crisis and confront a history of racist housing practices, Minneapolis has decided to eliminate single-family zoning, a classification that has long perpetuated segregation.
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Interactive
Community:
Nov 15, 2018
In an equitable DC, every resident would have the opportunity to prosper. But decades of discriminatory policies and practices have created inequities by ward, neighborhood, and race and ethnicity. Public, private, and nonprofit interventions have narrowed these gaps, but more needs to be done to level the playing field. This tool shows what it would take to improve equity across wards and neighborhoods on 16 key indicators. Select different areas of the District to compare or set your own goals for equity.

Authored by: The Urban Institute
Topics: Community development, East Coast, Education, Mobility, Place-based, Post-secondary, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 6, 2018
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Podcast
Community:
Why does it seem as if poverty is segregated to certain neighborhoods? What’s the secret to addressing the root of intergenerational poverty? How can we bring in new investment while preserving the history and culture of a place? Join us to explore these questions and more.

Authored by: Purpose Built Communities
Topics: Community development, Education, Health, Housing, Low-income, Mobility, Place-based, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 5, 2018

This is Community Podcast

Podcast
Purpose Built Communities
Why does it seem as if poverty is segregated to certain neighborhoods? What’s the secret to addressing the root of intergenerational poverty? How can we bring in new investment while preserving the history and culture of a place? Join us to explore these questions and more.
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Interactive
Community:
The 2018 Purpose Built Conference in Orlando, Florida from October 24 – 26 was a tremendous opportunity for thoughtful engagement and energetic conversations with Network Members and attendees from all across the country. Our panel of guest speakers represented a wide range of industries and brought unique perspectives and insights.

Authored by: Purpose Built Communities
Topics: Community development, Education, Health, Housing, Low-income, Mobility, Partnerships, Place-based
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 5, 2018
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Publication
Community:
Nov 14, 2018
In collaboration with Project for Public Spaces (PPS), the National Main Street Center (NMSC), and others, the Bass Center will examine the place needs of people and businesses and use that knowledge to help public, private, and civic sectors leaders develop new approaches to creating and supporting concentrations of economic activity that drive inclusive economic growth. The Center is premised on the idea that these “economic districts” represent the geographies in which leaders can have the most transformative impact—where they can build local trust and understanding, experiment safely, show results early and often, and measure impact against a place-centered vision and goals.

Authored by: Jennifer S. Vey for The Brookings Institution
Topics: Community development, Low-income, Mobility, Partnerships, Place-based
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 5, 2018

Why we need to invest in transformative placemaking

Publication
Nov 14, 2018
Jennifer S. Vey for The Brookings Institution
In collaboration with Project for Public Spaces (PPS), the National Main Street Center (NMSC), and others, the Bass Center will examine the place needs of people and businesses and use that knowledge to help public, private, and civic sectors leaders develop new approaches to creating and supporting
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Publication
Community:
Dec 5, 2018
The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 provides a new incentive—centered around the deferral, reduction, and elimination of capital gains taxes—to spur private investments in low-income areas designated by states as Opportunity Zones. This provision is based heavily on the Investing in Opportunity Act (S. 1639) introduced by Senator Cory Booker (D-NJ) and Senator Tim Scott (R-SC). Given the significant interest among investors, it is possible that this new tax incentive could attract hundreds of billions of dollars in private capital, making this one of the largest economic development initiatives in U.S. history.

Authored by: Bruce Katz and Ken Gross
Topics: Community development, Funding, Legislation & Policy, Mobility, Place-based
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 5, 2018
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Report
Community:
Sep 12, 2017
Broadband, especially wireline broadband in American homes, is the essential infrastructure for unlocking the internet’s economic benefits. However, broadband infrastructure is far from ubiquitous, both in terms of where it operates and who subscribes to it, and those deficits are not shared evenly across the country. As such, policymakers must understand how the national digital divide varies depending on the place.

Authored by: Adie Tomer, Elizabeth Kneebone, and Ranjitha Shivaram for The Brookings Institution
Topics: Broadband, Education, Low-income, Mobility, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 3, 2018