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Elements of a Successful Partnership

With generous support from the MacArthur Foundation, CLPHA developed an in-depth report on regional housing-education collaborations taking place at housing authorities across the Pacific-Northwest.

Read the Multimedia Report
 

National Snapshot of PHA-Health Partnerships

The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) provides new data about public housing authorities’ partnerships with the health sector and offers recommendations to encourage collaboration between these affordable housing providers and their health system partners.

Read the Report
 
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Interactive
Community:
Aug 3, 2021
Use this toolkit to assist in pursuing partnerships with school districts to provide afterschool and summer programs to support student recovery. Districts must spend a minimum of 20% of their funds on learning loss, which explicitly calls out summer and afterschool programs as an allowable use.

Authored by: Afterschool Alliance
Topics: Education, Funding, Out-of-school time
Shared by Kirsten Greenwell on Aug 3, 2021
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Report
Community:
May 13, 2021
Tim Higashi and Stuart M. Butler look at several examples of innovative ways in which communities responded to COVID-19 by using a variety of special techniques to “braid and blend” funds from different programs and sources to address pressing health, education and other service need. They argue that such special flexible budgeting techniques should not end with the pandemic, but should become an integral feature of budget procedures to enable communities to reach social goals

Authored by: Stuart M. Butler and Timothy Higashi for THE BROOKINGS INSTITUTION
Topics: Advocacy, Community development, COVID-19, Data sharing, Funding, Legislation & Policy
Shared by Housing Is on May 25, 2021

The COVID-19 experience shows government budgeting can become more nimble

Report
May 13, 2021
Stuart M. Butler and Timothy Higashi for THE BROOKINGS INSTITUTION
Tim Higashi and Stuart M. Butler look at several examples of innovative ways in which communities responded to COVID-19 by using a variety of special techniques to “braid and blend” funds from different programs and sources to address pressing health, education and other service need.
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Report
Community: Youth
Dec 1, 2020
420,000. Based on the new report, "Lost in the Masked Shuffle & Virtual Void: Children and Youth Experiencing Homelessness Amidst the Pandemic" from SchoolHouse Connection and Poverty Solutions at the University of Michigan, that’s how many fewer children and youth experiencing homelessness have been identified and enrolled by schools so far this school year. According to our data and insights - gathered from educators and homeless liaisons across 49 states - the number of children, youth, and families experiencing homelessness has likely increased due to the economic crisis. Yet, because of COVID-19 challenges in identifying children and youth experiencing homelessness, hundreds of thousands may not be getting the education and support they need - from internet access, to housing, to food, to child care. What’s more, only 18% of respondents indicated that federal coronavirus relief education funding provided by the CARES Act is being used to meet the needs of students experiencing homelessness. To break generational cycles of homelessness, we must take swift action to support the increasing number of children, youth, and families in need. Check out our report to learn more and take action. We have included recommendations for Congressional leaders, state and local educational agencies, homeless, housing, food, and other relief agencies, and philanthropic organizations.

Authored by: Poverty Solutions at THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN & SCHOOLHOUSE CONNECTION
Topics: Attendance, Child welfare, Early childhood, Education, Funding, Health, Homelessness, Low-income, Stability, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Dec 1, 2020
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Report
Community: Youth
Nov 3, 2020
As housing costs have escalated and inequities persist across the country, many young people need flexible, empowerment-based investments to get stably housed and onto a path to thriving. To this end, direct financial assistance (“cash transfers”) with other supports offer a promising solution grounded in a robust global evidence base. The circumstances of COVID-19 amplify the importance of developing and evaluating youth-informed approaches to doing things differently. This report shares results and implications of a year-long research and stakeholder engagement process that Chapin Hall conducted in collaboration with Point Source Youth to inform the development of a Direct Cash Transfer Program (DCTP) for youth experiencing homelessness. We look forward to piloting and rigorously evaluating a program based on these findings, starting in NYC.

Authored by: Matthew Morton for CHAPIN HALL AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO
Topics: Community development, Funding, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Nov 3, 2020
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Report
Community:
Sep 27, 2017
The Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that from 2014-2024, employment in healthcare occupations is projected to grow by 19 percent and add about 2.3 million jobs. Yet, these workers often do not earn enough to live in communities they serve. The report, which focuses on the affordability challenges faced by healthcare workers, highlights five fast growing healthcare occupations: dental assistant, emergency medical technician, home health aide, licensed practical nurse and physical therapy aide.

Authored by: Kaitlyn Snyder for NATIONAL HOUSING CONFERENCE
Topics: Funding, Legislation & Policy, Stability, Workforce development
Shared by Housing Is on Oct 20, 2020
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News Article
Community: Youth
Feb 1, 2018
Chicago’s troubling homicide rate could be significantly reduced through a massive increase in state spending for Chicago schools. That's just one of the proposals floated Monday by a prominent University of Chicago economist Jens Ludwig. With a substantial commitment, he says homicides could be reduced by nearly 60 percent. Illinois is dead last when it comes to the percentage of education dollars provided by the state to its cities. Ludwig believes adding $1.7 billion dollars would not only bring Illinois up to the national average, but could substantially reduce gun violence as well. Given the social science evidence on the link between high school graduation and gun violence, that would be about a 30 percent decrease in the homicide rates in the city of Chicago for something that has absolutely nothing to do with the city of Chicago policies.

Authored by: FOX 32 CHICAGO
Topics: Child welfare, Community development, Education, Funding, Legislation & Policy, Preventative care, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Oct 15, 2020
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Video
Community:
Jun 12, 2020
June 4-5, 2020, Hosted Virtually via Zoom

Authored by: CLPHA
Topics: Funding, Health, Housing, Medicaid / Medicare, Summit 2020
Shared by Steve Lucas on Jun 12, 2020
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Report
Community:
Jun 6, 2019
Trends in Housing Assistance and Who it Serves

Authored by: PAHRC
Topics: Community development, Disabilities, Education, Funding, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Partnerships, Research, Seniors, Workforce development, Youth
Shared by Keely Stater on Sep 10, 2019
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Research
Community:
Aug 5, 2019
CLPHA developed a general data sharing template that public housing authorities (PHAs) and their health partners can customize to suit their data sharing and collaboration needs. Please feel free to comment to share any uses/modifications your organization made to implement into a partnership.

Authored by:
Topics: Affordable Care Act, CLPHA, Community development, Cost effectiveness, Data sharing, Dental, Depression, Dual-eligibles, Funding, Health, Healthy homes, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Mental health, Metrics, MTW, Nutrition, Obesity, Partnerships, Place-based, Preventative care, Racial inequalities, Research, SAMHSA, Smoke-free, Stability, Substance abuse, Supportive housing, Sustainability, TA
Shared by Steve Lucas on Aug 5, 2019

CLPHA Data Sharing Template for PHAs and Health Organizations

 

Disclaimer: This template is provided for informational purposes only and not for the purpose of providing legal advice. You should contact your attorney to obtain advice with respect to any particular issue or question. Use of this template, including its exhibits and attachments, does not create a relationship or any responsibilities between CLPHA and the user.

Research
Aug 5, 2019
CLPHA developed a general data sharing template that public housing authorities (PHAs) and their health partners can customize to suit their data sharing and collaboration needs. Please feel free to comment to share any uses/modifications your organization made to implement into a partnership.
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Report
Community:
May 1, 2019
Protecting and improving the health of pregnant and postpartum women, infants, and young children is critically important. Those eligible for WIC — and frequently their communities and the nation — are facing levels of poverty, food insecurity, inadequate dietary intake, obesity, and ill health that are far too high. Research shows that WIC can help to alleviate these problems for children, mothers, and their families, and improve overall health and well-being. Yet the program is reaching far too few eligible people: only 3 out of 5. Increasing access to and strengthening WIC is essential to improving nutrition and reducing health disparities in this nation.

Authored by: Food Research & Action Center (FRAC)
Topics: Early childhood, Family engagement, Food insecurity, Funding, Health, Legislation & Policy, Low-income
Shared by Housing Is on Jun 3, 2019
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News Article
Community:
May 13, 2019
After natural disasters, recovery efforts tend to lift up those who have resources to bounce back quickly, but cement poverty for those with modest means.

Authored by: Chrishelle Palay for ShelterForce
Topics: Funding, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, U.S. Territories
Shared by Housing Is on May 29, 2019
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Report
Community:
May 1, 2019
Child poverty is an urgent and preventable crisis. Solutions to child poverty already exist if we just expand and invest in them. Benefits like nutrition assistance, housing vouchers and tax credits helped lift nearly 7 million children out of poverty in 2017, but millions of children were left behind due to inadequate funding, eligibility restrictions and low wages. We can and must fix these problems to help more children escape poverty now.

Authored by: Children's Defense Fund
Topics: Child welfare, Dual-generation, Early childhood, Food insecurity, Funding, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Research, Workforce development
Shared by Housing Is on May 28, 2019
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Video
Community:
May 24, 2019
Foundations often play a leadership role in forging innovative cross-sector collaboration. Hear from funders about their philanthropic giving and impact investing strategies aimed at expanding opportunity and improving long-term life outcomes for lower-income individuals and communities.

Authored by: Housing Is, CLPHA
Topics: CLPHA, Funding, Homelessness, Housing, Partnerships
Shared by Housing Is on May 24, 2019

Housing Is Summit 2019 - PLENARY: PHILANTHROPY'S INVESTMENT IN LONG-TERM CHANGE

Video
May 24, 2019
Housing Is, CLPHA
Foundations often play a leadership role in forging innovative cross-sector collaboration. Hear from funders about their philanthropic giving and impact investing strategies aimed at expanding opportunity and improving long-term life outcomes for lower-income individuals and communities.
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News Article
Community:
May 16, 2019
Mold. Leaks. Rodents. Crime. These are just some of the things the nation's 2 million public housing residents have to worry about. Many of the buildings they live in have been falling into disrepair for decades. Public housing officials estimate that it would cost $50 billion to fix them up. But the Trump administration wants to eliminate the federal fund now used to repair public housing in favor of attracting more private investment to fix up and replace it.

Authored by: Pam Fessler for NPR
Topics: CLPHA, Funding, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income
Shared by Housing Is on May 20, 2019

Trump Administration Wants To Cut Funding For Public Housing Repairs

News Article
May 16, 2019
Pam Fessler for NPR
Mold. Leaks. Rodents. Crime. These are just some of the things the nation's 2 million public housing residents have to worry about. Many of the buildings they live in have been falling into disrepair for decades. Public housing officials estimate that it would cost $50 billion to fix them up.
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Policy Brief
Community:
May 9, 2019
On May 9, the House Appropriations Committee passed its FY2020 appropriations bill for Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education. The House bill includes $100 million in FY2020 funding for the McKinney-Vento Act’s Education for Homeless Children and Youth (EHCY) program. This represents a 7% increase over the FY2019 level; if enacted, it would represent a 30% increase in EHCY funding since FY2017.

Authored by: SchoolHouse Connection
Topics: Child welfare, Funding, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy
Shared by Housing Is on May 15, 2019

House Committee Approves Funding Increase for Homeless Children and Youth

Policy Brief
May 9, 2019
SchoolHouse Connection
On May 9, the House Appropriations Committee passed its FY2020 appropriations bill for Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education. The House bill includes $100 million in FY2020 funding for the McKinney-Vento Act’s Education for Homeless Children and Youth (EHCY) program.
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Video
Community:
May 9, 2019
On May 9, the Brookings Institution hosted an event to discuss the subsequent report, “A Roadmap to Reducing Child Poverty.” The event featured comments from Greg Duncan, who served as Chair of the Committee on Building an Agenda to Reduce the Number of Children in Poverty by Half in 10 Years, as well as a panel discussion on the report, its recommendations, and barriers to implementation. A second panel highlighted national and state policy perspectives of the consensus study report.

Authored by: The Brookings Institution
Topics: Early childhood, Funding, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Research, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on May 13, 2019
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News Article
Community:
May 7, 2019
More and more, the homeless are making themselves at home in L.A.'s public places. Problems related to that population are putting a strain on city agencies.

Authored by: Rob Hayes for ABC 7
Topics: Funding, Homelessness, Housing, West Coast
Shared by Housing Is on May 9, 2019
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News Article
Community:
May 6, 2019
A new study shows that Miami’s affordable housing crisis is so dire, the city needs at least 50,000 units just to meet the existing need. But the Connect Capital Miami Report, which was released Monday, also reveals a combination of tools and resources that could help alleviate the dearth of housing for cost-burdened residents.

Authored by: Rene Rodriguez for the Miami Herald
Topics: Funding, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Research
Shared by Housing Is on May 7, 2019
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Policy Brief
Community:
Congress has an important opportunity in 2019 to improve the health of millions of our nation’s children by passing a strong reauthorization that protects and strengthens the child nutrition programs. These successful, cost-effective federal nutrition programs play a critical role in helping children in low-income families achieve access to child care, educational, and enrichment activities while improving overall nutrition, health, development, and academic achievement.

Authored by: Feeding America and Food Research & Action Center
Topics: Child welfare, Early childhood, Food insecurity, Funding, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Nutrition
Shared by Housing Is on May 1, 2019
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Publication
Community:
Apr 24, 2019
The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and states spend over $300 billion per year on the care of dually eligible individuals, yet still do not achieve acceptable health outcomes. In a 2016 study of social risk factors in the Medicare value-based purchasing programs, dual enrollment status was the most powerful predictor of poor outcomes. For example, relative to Medicare-only beneficiaries, dually eligible individuals had 10-31 percent higher risk-adjusted odds of hospital readmission across conditions measured in the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program, and scores were lower for dually eligible individuals on nearly all (17 of 19) beneficiary-level quality measures in Medicare Advantage.

Authored by: Seema Verma for Health Affairs
Topics: Dual-eligibles, Funding, Health, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Research, Seniors
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 24, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Apr 17, 2019
While Congress has both the power and the duty to forestall the loss of this important resource, its actions to date only hasten the deterioration and demolition of public housing.

Authored by: Timothy Kaiser for the Orlando Sentinel
Topics: Funding, Housing, Legislation & Policy
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 19, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Apr 15, 2019
Rapid re-housing was designed for people experiencing homelessness who have a good chance of paying for their own housing after a one-time boost. The Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority, which manages Measure H spending, is using the program to house a much wider segment of the homeless population.

Authored by: Madeleine Brand for KCRW
Topics: Funding, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, West Coast
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 18, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Mar 13, 2019
Lawmakers are currently considering legislation meant to put some extra cash in the pockets of families like Franson’s. House Bill 1527 and its companion, Senate Bill 5810, would create the Working Families Tax Credit, which supporters say would make Washington’s tax code less regressive while helping households with the rising cost of living. The federal government and other states have similar programs and use rely on income tax returns to distribute credits. Washington has no income tax. If the bill passes, people would apply through the state Employment Security Department, which would determine eligibility and calculate and write checks to those eligible.

Authored by: Jake Thomas for The Columbian
Topics: Asset building, Funding, Legislation & Policy, Low-income
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 18, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Apr 7, 2019
Puerto Rico was in financial distress and had crumbling infrastructure before Hurricane Maria, and many residents complain of government malfeasance that exacerbated the storm’s impact, echoing criticism from Washington. But Puerto Rican leaders say the delay to the Vieques hospital and thousands of other stalled projects is a reflection of unequal treatment from the White House and Congress, which last week failed to pass disaster relief legislation because of a dispute over how much money to send the island.

Authored by: Patricia Mazzei for The New York Times
Topics: Community development, Food insecurity, Funding, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Nutrition, U.S. Territories
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 15, 2019
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Report
Community:
Apr 8, 2019
While the program has changed very little since its inception, the need for the program has increased. In 1975, the number of program grantees stood at 594. Today, the number of grantees stands at 1,268 as more communities qualify to receive direct program allocations. Based on a CDBG Needs Survey conducted by the CDBG Coalition (and discussed later in this report), CDBG grantees have delayed and canceled projects and reduced or permanently eliminated programs because of a lack of CDBG funds. CDBG is an important investment tool for communities and neighborhoods, but program funding must increase to meet local need to ensure CDBG grantee communities are healthy, vibrant and thriving.

Authored by:
Topics: Community development, Funding, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Partnerships, Research, Safety, Seniors
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 8, 2019

Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Program: Impact and Funding Need

A report of the CDBG Coalition

Report
Apr 8, 2019
While the program has changed very little since its inception, the need for the program has increased. In 1975, the number of program grantees stood at 594. Today, the number of grantees stands at 1,268 as more communities qualify to receive direct program allocations.