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Elements of a Successful Partnership

With generous support from the MacArthur Foundation, CLPHA developed an in-depth report on regional housing-education collaborations taking place at housing authorities across the Pacific-Northwest.

Read the Multimedia Report
 

National Snapshot of PHA-Health Partnerships

The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) provides new data about public housing authorities’ partnerships with the health sector and offers recommendations to encourage collaboration between these affordable housing providers and their health system partners.

Read the Report
 
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Report
Community:
May 6, 2021
As evidence grows that housing mobility programs can vastly improve residents’ life trajectories, today the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Institute for Health and Social Policy based at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and a network of experts released a report to help inform and guide supplementary research on the new Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) Mobility Demonstration Program from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Including input from leaders in the housing, health, education, and economic development fields, the Report of the Housing Mobility Research Road Map Project provides research considerations for the HCV Mobility Demonstration Program, which will begin funding nine public housing agencies in Spring 2021 to provide housing vouchers and mobility services to help families move to lower-poverty neighborhoods. Housing mobility programs have the potential to disrupt historic patterns of segregation and increase families’ economic mobility. As these programs are implemented, there will be opportunities for research to inform a broad range of public policies including health, education, and housing policy.

Authored by: Oktawia Wójcik for ROBERT WOOD JOHNSON FOUNDATION & Craig Pollack for JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY
Topics: Advocacy, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Mobility, Racial inequalities
Shared by Housing Is on May 25, 2021

Report of the Housing Mobility Research Road Map Project

Report
May 6, 2021
Oktawia Wójcik for ROBERT WOOD JOHNSON FOUNDATION & Craig Pollack for JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY
As evidence grows that housing mobility programs can vastly improve residents’ life trajectories, today the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Institute for Health and Social Policy based at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and a network of experts released a report to help inform and g
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Report
Community:
May 13, 2021
Tim Higashi and Stuart M. Butler look at several examples of innovative ways in which communities responded to COVID-19 by using a variety of special techniques to “braid and blend” funds from different programs and sources to address pressing health, education and other service need. They argue that such special flexible budgeting techniques should not end with the pandemic, but should become an integral feature of budget procedures to enable communities to reach social goals

Authored by: Stuart M. Butler and Timothy Higashi for THE BROOKINGS INSTITUTION
Topics: Advocacy, Community development, COVID-19, Data sharing, Funding, Legislation & Policy
Shared by Housing Is on May 25, 2021

The COVID-19 experience shows government budgeting can become more nimble

Report
May 13, 2021
Stuart M. Butler and Timothy Higashi for THE BROOKINGS INSTITUTION
Tim Higashi and Stuart M. Butler look at several examples of innovative ways in which communities responded to COVID-19 by using a variety of special techniques to “braid and blend” funds from different programs and sources to address pressing health, education and other service need.
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Video
Community:
May 20, 2021
Based off of data that Ohio has high rates of infant mortality, housing authorities there are working to address this concern, which disproportionately affects people of color. Under different initiatives, the Akron and Columbus Metropolitan Housing Authorities collaborate with cross-sector partners like mayor’s offices and public health officials to improve outcomes. Panelists will describe their efforts, tactics to reach at-risk families, and ways to fund the work.

Authored by: CLPHA
Topics: Advocacy, Child welfare, Community development, Health, Healthy homes, Legislation & Policy, Pre-natal, Racial inequalities
Shared by Housing Is on May 20, 2021
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Video
Community:
May 18, 2021
Over the past several years, CLPHA has worked with its members to disseminate information on the best eviction prevention practices and many public housing authorities (PHAs) have made great progress in developing new strategies to keep families housed. The eventual ending of the CDC eviction moratorium provides an opportunity for PHAs to review their eviction prevention strategies. Panelists will review the latest research on COVID-19 and evictions, protecting voucher holders from eviction, and work that PHAs are doing to evaluate their own eviction practices through a racial equity lens.

Authored by: CLPHA
Topics: Community development, COVID-19, Healthy homes, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Racial inequalities
Shared by Housing Is on May 18, 2021

CLPHA HousingIs Summit 2021: Revisiting Eviction Prevention Practices Amid the COVID-19 Pandemic

Video
May 18, 2021
CLPHA
Over the past several years, CLPHA has worked with its members to disseminate information on the best eviction prevention practices and many public housing authorities (PHAs) have made great progress in developing new strategies to keep families housed.
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Video
Community:
May 18, 2021
Long before the pandemic forced virtual learning and digital connections, public housing authorities have been working to address unequal access to the internet and devices. Recent provisions in COVID-19 relief packages have begun to provide for temporary assistance for low-income individuals and families, and PHAs and legislators are pushing for more permanent supports. Panelists will discuss recently enacted funds, as well as introduced legislation.

Authored by: CLPHA
Topics: Advocacy, Attendance, Broadband, CLPHA, Community development, Education, Legislation & Policy
Shared by Housing Is on May 18, 2021
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Video
Community:
May 18, 2021
Keynote: Michael Bennet (D-Co), Congressional Video Message. Plenary: Reducing Childhood Poverty. Following Housing Is' 2019 Summit discussion of reducing childhood poverty and the idea of a university child allowance, this panel will explore the renewed discussion of legislation around a child tax credit and the idea of a universal basic income.

Authored by: CLPHA
Topics: Child welfare, Community development, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on May 18, 2021
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Report
Community:
Jun 20, 2017
Over the past year, the United States Conference of Mayors and the Brookings Institution, along with the Project for Public Spaces have worked together to capture a new model of growth that is emerging in cities and the particular roles that mayors can play. This handbook offers concrete strategies for mayors and their administrations to facilitate the rise of innovation districts—small geographic areas within cities where research universities, medical institutions, and companies cluster and connect with start-ups, accelerators, and incubators. They reflect profound market and demographic dynamics that are revaluing proximity, density, walkability, and accessibility—in other words, the natural strengths of cities.

Authored by: Julie Wagner for BROOKINGS
Topics: Community development, Legislation & Policy, Research, Workforce development
Shared by Housing Is on Oct 20, 2020

Advancing a new wave of urban competitiveness: The role of mayors in the rise of innovation districts

Report
Jun 20, 2017
Julie Wagner for BROOKINGS
Over the past year, the United States Conference of Mayors and the Brookings Institution, along with the Project for Public Spaces have worked together to capture a new model of growth that is emerging in cities and the particular roles that mayors can play. This handbook offers concrete strategi
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Report
Community:
Sep 27, 2017
The Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that from 2014-2024, employment in healthcare occupations is projected to grow by 19 percent and add about 2.3 million jobs. Yet, these workers often do not earn enough to live in communities they serve. The report, which focuses on the affordability challenges faced by healthcare workers, highlights five fast growing healthcare occupations: dental assistant, emergency medical technician, home health aide, licensed practical nurse and physical therapy aide.

Authored by: Kaitlyn Snyder for NATIONAL HOUSING CONFERENCE
Topics: Funding, Legislation & Policy, Stability, Workforce development
Shared by Housing Is on Oct 20, 2020
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News Article
Community: Youth
Feb 1, 2018
Chicago’s troubling homicide rate could be significantly reduced through a massive increase in state spending for Chicago schools. That's just one of the proposals floated Monday by a prominent University of Chicago economist Jens Ludwig. With a substantial commitment, he says homicides could be reduced by nearly 60 percent. Illinois is dead last when it comes to the percentage of education dollars provided by the state to its cities. Ludwig believes adding $1.7 billion dollars would not only bring Illinois up to the national average, but could substantially reduce gun violence as well. Given the social science evidence on the link between high school graduation and gun violence, that would be about a 30 percent decrease in the homicide rates in the city of Chicago for something that has absolutely nothing to do with the city of Chicago policies.

Authored by: FOX 32 CHICAGO
Topics: Child welfare, Community development, Education, Funding, Legislation & Policy, Preventative care, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Oct 15, 2020
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Report
Community:
Nov 15, 2017
Federal, state, and local policies focused on neighborhood improvement have long emphasized the need for community organizations to share information, coordinate activities, and collaborate in the delivery of services. These partnerships build “community capacity,” as a way of promoting local problem solving and community well-being over the longer term. But, there has been only limited research on which patterns of neighborhood networks are most conducive to implementing effective collective work. This report uses social network analysis, drawing from a network survey, and extensive field research to ask how specific patterns of partnership promote better-implemented collaborations that in turn can successfully inform public policy. The findings in this report have a qualitative, observable component, making it possible for funders to identify neighborhoods with advantageous structural supports before choosing to invest in that location, and for practitioners to support certain patterns of community activity.

Authored by: David M. Greenberg for MDRC
Topics: Communications, Community development, Data sharing, Legislation & Policy, Partnerships
Shared by Housing Is on Oct 15, 2020

Network Effectiveness in Neighborhood Collaborations: Learning from the Chicago Community Networks Study

Report
Nov 15, 2017
David M. Greenberg for MDRC
Federal, state, and local policies focused on neighborhood improvement have long emphasized the need for community organizations to share information, coordinate activities, and collaborate in the delivery of services.
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Report
Community: Postsecondary
May 2, 2019
Innovative public housing authorities (PHAs) are collaborating with college access partners and community colleges to increase postsecondary educational achievement for low-income residents and college students experiencing homelessness. This report elevates 11 shared learnings from a recent convening of these five pioneering PHAs and their postsecondary collaborators, and offers a series of recommendations to policy makers, PHAs, and philanthropic organizations seeking to develop emerging cross-sector collaborations between housing and education organizations. The report also includes an overview of the federal policies that support and limit postsecondary achievement for students served by PHAs, and profiles of the five partnerships: CHA and partners City Colleges of Chicago and One Million Degrees; CMHA and partner Columbus State Community College; HACLA and partner Southern California College Access Network (SoCal CAN); LMHA and partner Family Scholar House; and THA and partner Tacoma Community College.

Authored by: Abra Lyons-Warren for CLPHA
Topics: CLPHA, Education, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Partnerships, Post-secondary, Stability
Shared by Abra Lyons-Warren on Oct 6, 2020

Eliminating Barriers to Postsecondary Success: Cross-Sector Collaborations to Improve Postsecondary Achievement for Students Served by Public Housing Authorities

Report
May 2, 2019
Abra Lyons-Warren for CLPHA
Innovative public housing authorities (PHAs) are collaborating with college access partners and community colleges to increase postsecondary educational achievement for low-income residents and college students experiencing homelessness.
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Webinar
Community:
Feb 12, 2020
A discussion with attorney Alex Elson from the National Student Legal Defense Network and director of FAIL STATE, Alex Shebanow, to talk about predatory for-profit institutions and how that affects low income residents. About the film: Over five years in the making, FAIL STATE investigates the for-profit college industry and the decades-long reports of student loan abuse within the sector. The film’s central thesis: aided by a cabal of politicians, nationwide disinvestment in public colleges and universities, and an unscrupulous desire to maximize profits at all costs, for-profit colleges have exploited millions of low-income and minority students, leaving them with worthless degrees and drowning in student loan debt. With echoes of the subprime mortgage crisis, director Alexander Shebanow traces the rise of the for-profit college industry in American higher education and uncovers a story that the Los Angeles Times calls “truly eye-opening and crucial.” The film premiered to sold-out shows at DOC NYC, SXSW EDU, Cleveland International, and debuted on STARZ in December 2018. Director Alexander Shebanow and Executive Producer Dan Rather were awarded the 2019 William Randolph Hearst Award for Outstanding Professional Media Service for their work on FAIL STATE.

Authored by: CLPHA
Topics: Advocacy, CLPHA, Education, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Post-secondary
Shared by Abra Lyons-Warren on Feb 12, 2020

CLPHA Education Working Group: Predatory PostSecondary Institutions Webinar

Webinar
Feb 12, 2020
CLPHA
A discussion with attorney Alex Elson from the National Student Legal Defense Network and director of FAIL STATE, Alex Shebanow, to talk about predatory for-profit institutions and how that affects low income residents. About the film: Over five years in the making, FAIL STATE investigates the fo
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Policy Brief
Community:
Dec 4, 2019
In California, more than 3.7 million students were eligible for free or reduced priced school meals in the 2017-2018 school year. For many of those students, school meals are the primary source of regular access to healthy food. When the bell rings at 3:00 or lets out for summer break, many of those students go home to nutritional uncertainty or high-calorie, low-nutrient foods. For many low-income families, the out-of-school-time food access gap increases family stress: limited budgets are stretched further to cover food, rent, utilities, transportation, medications, and chidcare costs. For very young children, food insecurity can negatively impact brain and physical development. For children of all ages, disrupted access to healthy food can impact behavior, increase risk of obesity, make it harder to concentrate, or exacerbate existing healthy conditions like type 2 diabetes. The impact is not limited to summer, and can lead to a rocky start to the school year, negatively impacting school attendance and students’ ability to effectively participate in school. Read the full brief to learn how public and affordable housing communities can address food insecurity for children and youth with the help of out-of-school-time USDA child nutrition programs.

Authored by:
Topics: Advocacy, Early childhood, Food insecurity, Health, Healthy homes, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Nutrition, Out-of-school time, West Coast, Youth
Shared by Linda Lu on Dec 4, 2019

Keeping Kids Healthy and Engaged When School is Out Through Public and Affordable Housing Communities

Policy Brief
Dec 4, 2019
In California, more than 3.7 million students were eligible for free or reduced priced school meals in the 2017-2018 school year. For many of those students, school meals are the primary source of regular access to healthy food.
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Report
Community:
Jun 6, 2019
Trends in Housing Assistance and Who it Serves

Authored by: PAHRC
Topics: Community development, Disabilities, Education, Funding, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Partnerships, Research, Seniors, Workforce development, Youth
Shared by Keely Stater on Sep 10, 2019
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Research
Community:
Aug 5, 2019
CLPHA developed a general data sharing template that public housing authorities (PHAs) and their health partners can customize to suit their data sharing and collaboration needs. Please feel free to comment to share any uses/modifications your organization made to implement into a partnership.

Authored by:
Topics: Affordable Care Act, CLPHA, Community development, Cost effectiveness, Data sharing, Dental, Depression, Dual-eligibles, Funding, Health, Healthy homes, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Mental health, Metrics, MTW, Nutrition, Obesity, Partnerships, Place-based, Preventative care, Racial inequalities, Research, SAMHSA, Smoke-free, Stability, Substance abuse, Supportive housing, Sustainability, TA
Shared by Steve Lucas on Aug 5, 2019

CLPHA Data Sharing Template for PHAs and Health Organizations

 

Disclaimer: This template is provided for informational purposes only and not for the purpose of providing legal advice. You should contact your attorney to obtain advice with respect to any particular issue or question. Use of this template, including its exhibits and attachments, does not create a relationship or any responsibilities between CLPHA and the user.

Research
Aug 5, 2019
CLPHA developed a general data sharing template that public housing authorities (PHAs) and their health partners can customize to suit their data sharing and collaboration needs. Please feel free to comment to share any uses/modifications your organization made to implement into a partnership.
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Policy Brief
Community:
Jun 4, 2019
The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has announced its intention to roll back protections for transgender people experiencing homelessness. The newly proposed rule, which is in the early stages of the rulemaking process and has not yet been publicly posted to the Federal Register, would allow homeless shelters to discriminate based on gender identity, putting transgender people in danger of violence and further housing instability. This is part of a long string of attacks the Trump administration has directed toward the transgender community, such as implementing the infamous military ban, contributing to a pattern that legally perpetuates discrimination against transgender people in this country.

Authored by: Aastha Uprety for Equal Rights Center
Topics: Health, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Racial inequalities
Shared by Housing Is on Jun 13, 2019
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Video
Community:
Jun 12, 2019
Zoning is a way for communities to separate land by use or form. But from the start, zoning has separated more than just land uses. It has also separated people. As a result, we pay the cost in public health, racial and economic injustices, higher housing costs, and more.

Authored by: How Housing Matters for The Urban Institute
Topics: Housing, Legislation & Policy, Racial inequalities
Shared by Housing Is on Jun 13, 2019
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Publication
Community:
Jun 12, 2019
Zoning rules dictate more than just how we can use and build on land. They also shape our communities and our lives. Land use laws determine where we can find housing, schools, and parks—and who has access to them.

Authored by: Maya Brennan, Emily Peiffer, and Kimberly Burrowes for How Housing Matters, The Urban Institute
Topics: Health, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Racial inequalities
Shared by Housing Is on Jun 13, 2019

How Zoning Shapes our Lives

Publication
Jun 12, 2019
Maya Brennan, Emily Peiffer, and Kimberly Burrowes for How Housing Matters, The Urban Institute
Zoning rules dictate more than just how we can use and build on land. They also shape our communities and our lives. Land use laws determine where we can find housing, schools, and parks—and who has access to them.
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News Article
Community:
Jun 10, 2019
More than a half million renters have been evicted in Los Angeles County over the past eight years, according to a new report by Public Counsel and the UCLA School of Law that calls on county supervisors to adopt permanent rent control measures.

Authored by: Jenna Chandler for Curbed Los Angeles
Topics: Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Research, West Coast
Shared by Housing Is on Jun 13, 2019

New report underscores link between 'shocking' number of evictions, homelessness

News Article
Jun 10, 2019
Jenna Chandler for Curbed Los Angeles
More than a half million renters have been evicted in Los Angeles County over the past eight years, according to a new report by Public Counsel and the UCLA School of Law that calls on county supervisors to adopt permanent rent control measures.
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Publication
Community:
Jun 11, 2019
The Trump Administration is publicly weighing plans to gradually lower the official poverty line by applying a smaller cost-of-living adjustment each year. Doing so would be unjustified for several reasons.

Authored by: Arloc Sherman and Paul Van de Water for The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
Topics: Child welfare, Food insecurity, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Nutrition, Stability
Shared by Housing Is on Jun 11, 2019

Reducing Cost-of-Living Adjustment Would Make Poverty Line a Less Accurate Measure of Basic Needs

Publication
Jun 11, 2019
Arloc Sherman and Paul Van de Water for The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
The Trump Administration is publicly weighing plans to gradually lower the official poverty line by applying a smaller cost-of-living adjustment each year. Doing so would be unjustified for several reasons.
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Publication
Community:
This paper analyzes why SNAP benefits are inadequate, reviews the body of research showing positive effects from more adequate SNAP benefits, and offers key policy solutions to improve benefit adequacy.

Authored by: Food Research & Action Center (FRAC)
Topics: Food insecurity, Health, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Nutrition, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Jun 11, 2019

Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program: Initiatives to Make SNAP Benefits More Adequate Significantly Improve Food Security, Nutrition, and Health

Publication
Food Research & Action Center (FRAC)
This paper analyzes why SNAP benefits are inadequate, reviews the body of research showing positive effects from more adequate SNAP benefits, and offers key policy solutions to improve benefit adequacy.
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News Article
Community:
Jun 5, 2019
In the United States, more than 2.7 million grandparents report that they’re primarily responsible for their grandchildren under 18. The problem is many are struggling with food insecurity because of federal rules and regulations.

Authored by: Marie C. Gualtieri for Next Avenue
Topics: Child welfare, Food insecurity, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Nutrition
Shared by Housing Is on Jun 11, 2019
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Communications
Community:
Consider using the following tweets and images during the Thursday, May 16, 3:00 pm ET tweetstorm. Continue to periodically share these posts on social media until the July 9, 2019 comment deadline.

Authored by: National Low Income Housing Coalition
Topics: Homelessness, Housing, Immigrants, Legislation & Policy
Shared by Housing Is on Jun 7, 2019
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Policy Brief
Community:
May 10, 2019
Policies such as those outlined in the draft proposed rule are having, and will continue to have a significant detrimental impact on survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault by deterring immigrant families, including those with U.S. citizen and Lawful Permanent Resident children, from accessing critical help when they need it. Housing assistance is a vital resource for survivors, giving them the security they need to leave abuse without having to fear that doing so will result in homelessness, as well as providing a safe environment to begin their recovery.

Authored by: Grace Huang for the Asian Pacific Institute on Gender-Based Violence
Topics: Domestic violence, Homelessness, Housing, Immigrants, Legislation & Policy
Shared by Housing Is on Jun 7, 2019

Advisory: How Do Recent HUD Proposed Rules About Verification of Immigration Status Impact Survivors of Domestic Violence & Sexual Assault?

Policy Brief
May 10, 2019
Grace Huang for the Asian Pacific Institute on Gender-Based Violence
Policies such as those outlined in the draft proposed rule are having, and will continue to have a significant detrimental impact on survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault by deterring immigrant families, including those with U.S.