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Elements of a Successful Partnership

With generous support from the MacArthur Foundation, CLPHA developed an in-depth report on regional housing-education collaborations taking place at housing authorities across the Pacific-Northwest.

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National Snapshot of PHA-Health Partnerships

The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) provides new data about public housing authorities’ partnerships with the health sector and offers recommendations to encourage collaboration between these affordable housing providers and their health system partners.

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Policy Brief
Community: Postsecondary
Nov 1, 2020
Colleges support students with advising, counseling, or coaching in academics and other skills they need to succeed in school. Some colleges enhance those services through reduced adviser caseloads and more comprehensive, frequent guidance, which can improve students’ semester-to-semester retention and average credits earned. This overview describes important lessons on designing and implementing those services. College leaders and administrators committed to designing, building, managing, and continually supporting enhanced advising services can consult this checklist of recommendations as they redesign or enhance these services — as stand-alone services or as part of multifaceted interventions.

Authored by: Andrea Vasquez & Susan Scrivener for MDRC
Topics: Attendance, Child welfare, Community development, Education, Grade-level proficiency, Post-secondary, Workforce development
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 4, 2021
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Report
Community: Youth
Dec 1, 2020
420,000. Based on the new report, "Lost in the Masked Shuffle & Virtual Void: Children and Youth Experiencing Homelessness Amidst the Pandemic" from SchoolHouse Connection and Poverty Solutions at the University of Michigan, that’s how many fewer children and youth experiencing homelessness have been identified and enrolled by schools so far this school year. According to our data and insights - gathered from educators and homeless liaisons across 49 states - the number of children, youth, and families experiencing homelessness has likely increased due to the economic crisis. Yet, because of COVID-19 challenges in identifying children and youth experiencing homelessness, hundreds of thousands may not be getting the education and support they need - from internet access, to housing, to food, to child care. What’s more, only 18% of respondents indicated that federal coronavirus relief education funding provided by the CARES Act is being used to meet the needs of students experiencing homelessness. To break generational cycles of homelessness, we must take swift action to support the increasing number of children, youth, and families in need. Check out our report to learn more and take action. We have included recommendations for Congressional leaders, state and local educational agencies, homeless, housing, food, and other relief agencies, and philanthropic organizations.

Authored by: Poverty Solutions at THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN & SCHOOLHOUSE CONNECTION
Topics: Attendance, Child welfare, Early childhood, Education, Funding, Health, Homelessness, Low-income, Stability, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Dec 1, 2020
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Report
Community: Youth
Nov 4, 2019
The ninth in a series of Research-to-Impact briefs by Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago on understanding and addressing youth homelessness. For the 4.2 million adolescents and young adults who experience some form of homelessness, opportunities to develop and realize their educational aspirations are often disrupted. Missed Opportunities: Education Among Youth and Young Adults Experiencing Homelessness in America highlights research on the intersection between youth homelessness and educational disruption. We learned that young people experiencing family instability and trauma are at increased risk for unstable living situations and interrupted educational experiences. Youth who leave school before graduation were considerably more likely to experience homelessness. Likewise, youth and young adults who experience homelessness were less likely to enroll in college. If we strengthen our educational supports and youth homelessness systems, we can do more than stop missing opportunities; we can ensure that our youth thrive and meet their full potential.

Authored by: CHAPIN HALL AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO
Topics: Attendance, Education, Homelessness, Post-secondary, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Oct 15, 2020

Missed Opportunities: Education Among Youth Experiencing Homelessness in America

Report
Nov 4, 2019
CHAPIN HALL AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO
The ninth in a series of Research-to-Impact briefs by Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago on understanding and addressing youth homelessness. For the 4.2 million adolescents and young adults who experience some form of homelessness, opportunities to develop and realize their educational aspira
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Report
Community: Postsecondary
Jan 28, 2020
The nation’s community colleges play a central role in producing a more educated workforce and promoting social mobility. They serve about 40 percent of all college students and, not surprisingly, they serve a disproportionate number of low-income and underrepresented students. But most students who enter these colleges do not graduate — only about a third of entering students earn a degree or certificate within six years. Among the many programs that have attempted to increase graduation rates, one program stands out. Developed by the City University of New York (CUNY), the Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP) is a comprehensive program that provides students with up to three years of financial and academic support and other support services. Along with those services and other forms of support comes an obligation to attend full time and participate in essential program services. An experimental evaluation of CUNY ASAP found that the program nearly doubled graduation rates after three years. This report presents findings through three years from a replication of the ASAP model at three community colleges in Ohio.

Authored by: Cynthia Miller for MDRC
Topics: Attendance, Education, Post-secondary, School-readiness, Workforce development
Shared by Housing Is on Oct 6, 2020

Increasing Community College Graduation Rates with a Proven Model: Three-Year Results from the Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP) Ohio Demonstration

Report
Jan 28, 2020
Cynthia Miller for MDRC
The nation’s community colleges play a central role in producing a more educated workforce and promoting social mobility. They serve about 40 percent of all college students and, not surprisingly, they serve a disproportionate number of low-income and underrepresented students.
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Podcast
Community: Postsecondary
May 28, 2020
Community colleges graduation rates remain low. Some studies have shown that students who enroll in summer courses are more likely to stay on track and graduate, yet despite these benefits most college students do not attend during the summer. So why don’t students attend, and how can colleges encourage more of them to enroll in the summer? To answer these questions MDRC launched the Encouraging Additional Summer Enrollment — or EASE — project in partnership with the Ohio Association of Community Colleges and 10 community colleges in Ohio. MDRC designed, implemented, and tested two interventions to encourage summer enrollment, using insights from behavioral science, a study of how people make decisions. Both interventions worked to increase enrollment, and both could be operated at a relatively low cost

Authored by: Leigh Parise for MDRC
Topics: Attendance, Education, Post-secondary, School-readiness, Workforce development
Shared by Housing Is on Oct 6, 2020
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Report
Community:
Nov 7, 2019
How Housing Programs Can Support the Educational Needs of Children Living in Publicly Supported Homes

Authored by: Public and Affordable Housing Research Corporation
Topics: Attendance, Broadband, Child welfare, Early childhood, Health, Housing, Literacy, Low-income, Out-of-school time, Partnerships, Place-based, Research, School-readiness
Shared by Kelly McElwain on Nov 7, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Oct 1, 2018
When children get sick from poor living conditions inside their rundown apartments, they miss school. And when 95 percent of students of one school live in the same apartment complex—where evictions are routine and black mold is rampant—classrooms are often left empty.

Authored by: Jamie Hwang for the American Bar Association Journal
Topics: Attendance, Child welfare, Education, Health, Housing, Low-income, Partnerships, Place-based, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 11, 2019

Atlanta pro bono proram expands to resolve elementary school students' housing issues

News Article
Oct 1, 2018
Jamie Hwang for the American Bar Association Journal
When children get sick from poor living conditions inside their rundown apartments, they miss school. And when 95 percent of students of one school live in the same apartment complex—where evictions are routine and black mold is rampant—classrooms are often left empty.
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Webinar
Community:
Feb 12, 2019
During CLPHA’s Education Working Group Webinar on addressing school attendance at PHAs, representatives from the King County Housing Authority and the national nonprofit Attendance Works presented on tools for addressing chronic absenteeism, as well as strategies for fostering a culture of attendance among residents.

Authored by: CLPHA, Housing Is
Topics: Attendance, CLPHA, Dual-generation, Education, Housing, Low-income, Metrics, Partnerships, Place-based
Shared by Housing Is on Feb 12, 2019
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Publication
Community:
Jan 9, 2019
In this post, we hope to inspire others working in PreK-12 educational settings to examine rates of chronic absenteeism among the students they serve. We define chronic absenteeism and share three graphic displays of chronic absence data from our school district, the Washoe County School District located in Reno, NV.

Authored by: Tori Vohland and Jennifer Harris for Schoolhouse Connection
Topics: Attendance, Child welfare, Education, Homelessness, Housing, Partnerships, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 24, 2019
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Interactive
Community:
Aug 31, 2018
Over the past decade, chronic absence has gone from being a virtually unknown concept to a national education metric that provides every school in the nation with critical data on how many students are missing so many days of school it jeopardizes their academic success. The Hamilton Project at the Brookings Institution has created this interactive map using national data reported by school districts to the U.S. Department of Education Office for Civil Rights from the 2015-16 school year to allow anyone to explore rates of chronic absence at the school, district, state, and national levels by student and school characteristics. This interactive map accompanies an Attendance Works report, Data Matters: Using Chronic Absence to Accelerate Action for Student Success by Hedy Chang, Lauren Bauer, and Vaughan Byrnes.

Authored by: The Hamilton Project and The Brookings Institution
Topics: Attendance, Education, Metrics, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 16, 2018

Chronic Absence across the United States, 2015-16 School Year

Interactive
Aug 31, 2018
The Hamilton Project and The Brookings Institution
Over the past decade, chronic absence has gone from being a virtually unknown concept to a national education metric that provides every school in the nation with critical data on how many students are missing so many days of school it jeopardizes their academic success.
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Case study
Community:
Jun 25, 2018
The King County Housing Authority (KCHA), in partnership with the Highline School District and the nonprofit social service organization Neighborhood House, launched the Student and Family Stability Initiative (SFSI) pilot program in 2013 to provide housing and employment supports to homeless and unstably housed families with children enrolled in Highline elementary schools. In 2016, KCHA contracted with the Urban Institute (Urban) to conduct a process and outcome evaluation of the program’s first three pilot years. This evaluation documents how SFSI works, who it serves, and how well it helps participants achieve housing stability. This report synthesizes findings from data collection conducted over approximately 10 months that included document review, interviews with SFSI stakeholders, and analysis of program and other relevant KCHA administrative data.

Authored by: Martha M. Galvez, Amanda Gold, and Sara McTarnaghan
Topics: Attendance, Dual-generation, Education, Family engagement, Housing, Low-income, Pacific Northwest, Partnerships, Place-based, Research, Stability, Workforce development, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 18, 2018

Evaluation of the Student and Family Stability Initiative

Case study
Jun 25, 2018
Martha M. Galvez, Amanda Gold, and Sara McTarnaghan
The King County Housing Authority (KCHA), in partnership with the Highline School District and the nonprofit social service organization Neighborhood House, launched the Student and Family Stability Initiative (SFSI) pilot program in 2013 to provide housing and employment supports to homeless and un
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Infographics
Community:
Jul 19, 2018
School readiness, school attendance, and summer learning

Authored by:
Topics: Attendance, Dual-generation, Early childhood, Education, Family engagement, Grade-level proficiency, Literacy, Out-of-school time, School-readiness
Shared by Housing Is on Jul 19, 2018
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Report
Community:
Jul 11, 2018
To help inform policymakers and move policy forward, this paper discusses the current state of housing in the United States, provides a conceptual framework for housing as a platform to improve educational outcomes for children, reviews the existing evidence that supports conceptual models, and identifies the major gaps in research. Finally, it proposes a list of projects that make up a research agenda for understanding the issue and guiding investments in new research.

Authored by:
Topics: Attendance, Child welfare, Early childhood, Education, Housing, Literacy, Low-income, Mental health, Post-secondary, Preventative care, Racial inequalities, Research, Safety, Stability, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Jul 11, 2018

Housing as a Platform for Improving Education Outcomes among Low-Income Children

Report
Jul 11, 2018
To help inform policymakers and move policy forward, this paper discusses the current state of housing in the United States, provides a conceptual framework for housing as a platform to improve educational outcomes for children, reviews the existing evidence that supports conceptual models, and iden
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Report
Community:
Jul 10, 2018
HUD Administrative Data Linked with the National Health Interview Survey

Authored by:
Topics: Attendance, Child welfare, Data sharing, Dental, Health, Housing, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Mental health, Metrics, Racial inequalities, Vision
Shared by Housing Is on Jul 10, 2018
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News Article
Community:
Jul 5, 2018
"There's no silver bullet" to end chronic absenteeism, but a simple "nudge" letter has shown real success in reducing truancy. It's working in Tacoma, and it's caught the interest of the Seattle Housing Authority, which houses 10 percent of Seattle's public-school students.

Authored by: Neal Morton for The Seattle Times
Topics: Attendance, Dual-generation, East Coast, Education, Family engagement, Low-income, Research, West Coast, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Jul 9, 2018
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News Article
Community:
Dec 11, 2017

Authored by: Elizabeth A. Harris for The New York Times
Topics: Attendance, Child welfare, East Coast, Education, Grade-level proficiency, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Metrics, Out-of-school time, Racial inequalities, Research, School-readiness, Stability, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Jul 5, 2018
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News Article
Community:
Jul 3, 2018
Researchers have shown — and teachers know — that schoolchildren exposed to neighborhood violence can have a tougher time learning, experiencing more stress and depression than their peers growing up in safe neighborhoods. But a Johns Hopkins University sociologist discovered that the consequences of neighborhood violence reach further than previously known, even spilling over to students who come from safe neighborhoods. Using crime and student data from Chicago, Julia Burdick-Will linked exposure to neighborhood violence to a drop in test scores, an effect that extended to students coming from communities that experienced little or no violence.

Authored by: Moriah Balingit for The Washington Post
Topics: Attendance, Child welfare, Community development, Depression, Education, Health, Low-income, Mental health, Midwest, Out-of-school time, Post-secondary, Racial inequalities, Research, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jul 3, 2018

What happens when schoolchildren live in violent neighborhoods? The effects are broader than previously known, a study finds.

News Article
Jul 3, 2018
Moriah Balingit for The Washington Post
Researchers have shown — and teachers know — that schoolchildren exposed to neighborhood violence can have a tougher time learning, experiencing more stress and depression than their peers growing up in safe neighborhoods.
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News Article
Community:
Jul 2, 2018
Poor children don't struggle in school because of their parents. They struggle because of poverty.

Authored by: Mical Raz for The Washington Post
Topics: Attendance, Child welfare, Dual-generation, Early childhood, Education, Family engagement, Food insecurity, Grade-level proficiency, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Literacy, Low-income, Out-of-school time, Post-secondary, Racial inequalities, Research, School-readiness, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jul 3, 2018
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Video
Community:
May 23, 2018
The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) hosted The Housing Is Summit in Washington, D.C., on May 3-4, 2018 with 300 partners across the housing, education, and healthcare sectors. Access video recordings of the Summit's keynote speakers (HUD Secretary Ben Carson, John Bridgeland, Matthew Morton), plenary panels (on topics that cut across sectors like anchor institutions, data collaboration, stability, and foundation investments), and select breakout sessions focused on the intersections of housing, education, and health.

Authored by: Council of Large Public Housing Authorities
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Attendance, Child welfare, CLPHA, Community development, Data sharing, Dual-eligibles, Dual-generation, Early childhood, Education, Funding, Grade-level proficiency, Health, Healthy homes, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Mental health, Metrics, MTW, Out-of-school time, Partnerships, Place-based, Preventative care, Racial inequalities, Research, School-readiness, Seniors, Stability, Substance abuse, Supportive housing, Sustainability, TA, Workforce development, Youth
Shared by Steve Lucas on May 23, 2018

2018 CLPHA Housing Is Summit - Video Recordings

The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) hosted The Housing Is Summit in Washington, D.C., on May 3-4, 2018 with 200 partners across the housing, education, and healthcare sectors. The Summit highlighted the ways that we can transform systems to better serve low-income people with two days of plenary speakers/panels, breakout sessions, and caucus discussions geared toward intersectional thinking and ways to take action. 

Video
May 23, 2018
Council of Large Public Housing Authorities
The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) hosted The Housing Is Summit in Washington, D.C., on May 3-4, 2018 with 300 partners across the housing, education, and healthcare sectors.