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6th Annual Housing Is Summit April 30 & May 1

Register now to join practitioners, policymakers, executives, and researchers gathered in Washington, D.C., for CLPHA’s sixth annual Housing Is Summit, an event highlighting collaboration among the housing, education, and health sectors.

Get more info and register now!
 

Elements of a Successful Partnership

With generous support from the MacArthur Foundation, CLPHA developed an in-depth report on regional housing-education collaborations taking place at housing authorities across the Pacific-Northwest.

Read the Multimedia Report
 

National Snapshot of PHA-Health Partnerships

The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) provides new data about public housing authorities’ partnerships with the health sector and offers recommendations to encourage collaboration between these affordable housing providers and their health system partners.

Read the Report
 

Housing Is Summit 2019: Keynote Recap

Day Two of this year's Housing Is Summit began with an electrifying keynote by Dr. Camara Jones, a renowned epidemiologist and public health leader, who talked about the role of "social determinants of inequity" as they relate to health disparities and disparities in other key outcomes. 

View summary and video recording of Dr. Jones' keynote.
 
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Report
Community:
May 1, 2019
Child poverty is an urgent and preventable crisis. Solutions to child poverty already exist if we just expand and invest in them. Benefits like nutrition assistance, housing vouchers and tax credits helped lift nearly 7 million children out of poverty in 2017, but millions of children were left behind due to inadequate funding, eligibility restrictions and low wages. We can and must fix these problems to help more children escape poverty now.

Authored by: Children's Defense Fund
Topics: Child welfare, Dual-generation, Early childhood, Food insecurity, Funding, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Research, Workforce development
Shared by Housing Is on May 28, 2019
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Research
Community:
Early childhood education programs can impact life outcomes in ways that span generations, according to new research from Nobel laureate James Heckman. In a pair of companion papers released this week, the pioneering University of Chicago economist found that the children of those who participated in a landmark 1960s study still saw improvements in education, health and employment. The children saw such benefits without participating in the same preschool program as their parents—suggesting that early education can contribute to lasting upward mobility and help break cycles of poverty

Authored by: Professor James Heckman and Ganesh Karapakula
Topics: Child welfare, Dual-generation, Early childhood, Family engagement, Research
Shared by Housing Is on May 21, 2019
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Research
Community:
Apr 29, 2019
When following the mother–child pair from pregnancy through five years postpartum, the estimated cost is $14.2 billion for births in 2017, or an average of $32,000 for every mother–child pair affected but not treated.

Authored by: Mathematica
Topics: Dual-generation, Early childhood, Mental health, Pre-natal, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 30, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Apr 4, 2019
Education Design Lab taps four large community colleges in an ambitious effort to raise single-mother completion rate 30 percent at each institution by 2024.

Authored by: Education Design Lab for Ciston PR Newswire
Topics: Dual-generation, Early childhood, Family engagement, Low-income, Metrics, Post-secondary
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 18, 2019
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Publication
Community:
Founded in 1995 as Project Women, Family Scholar House (FSH) provides comprehensive, holistic services for disadvantaged single parents, their children, and foster alumni. The nonprofit seeks to end the cycle of poverty and transform communities by empowering families and youth to succeed in education and life-long self-sufficiency. FSH provides supportive housing, educational programming, and participant advocacy to help families gain independence.

Authored by: American Planning Association
Topics: Dual-generation, Early childhood, Education, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Partnerships, Place-based, Post-secondary, South, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 18, 2019
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Report
Community:
Apr 1, 2019
With 22 percent of the undergraduate student population comprised of parents, policymakers and institutions must explore the unique needs of this population and address the challenges that may prevent parents from attaining their degree. This includes determining what systems, services, and approaches best support their mental health needs. This brief examines opportunities for policymakers and academic institutions to adapt existing mental health services in order to meet the unique needs of students who are parents and help them complete their degree.

Authored by: Ascend: The Aspen Institute
Topics: Dual-generation, Early childhood, Mental health, Post-secondary
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 11, 2019

Accelerating Postsecondary Success for Parents: Identifying and Addressing Mental Health Needs

Report
Apr 1, 2019
Ascend: The Aspen Institute
With 22 percent of the undergraduate student population comprised of parents, policymakers and institutions must explore the unique needs of this population and address the challenges that may prevent parents from attaining their degree.
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Report
Community:
Apr 1, 2019
Investments in the postsecondary success of parents with young children can increase attainment of credentials leading to good jobs, bring children the benefits of high-quality learning environments, promote later college-going among children, and improve family economic security across generations. This factsheet provides figures on the student parent population based on the latest National Postsecondary Student Aid Study data.

Authored by: Ascend: The Aspen Institute
Topics: Dual-generation, Early childhood, Post-secondary, Research, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 11, 2019
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Publication
Community:
Managing director of Ascend at the Aspen Institute discusses the role of women in public health policy-making

Authored by: Ascend: The Aspen Institute
Topics: Dual-generation, Early childhood, Family engagement, Mental health, Pre-natal, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 2, 2019
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Interactive
Community:
Resources from Ascend at The Aspen Institute

Authored by: Ascend: The Aspen Institute
Topics: Asset building, Child welfare, Dual-generation, Early childhood, Family engagement, Research, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 2, 2019
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Research
Community:
Mar 28, 2019
Federal safety net programs are intended to protect the most vulnerable Americans—such as the elderly, people with severe disabilities and young children. Housing assistance plays a critical role in the safety net, providing decent, safe, and affordable housing for millions of extremely low-income and vulnerable families—though, because it is not an entitlement like other federal safety net programs, the assistance available falls far short of the need. Housing subsidies free families to spend on other essentials like healthy food, education, and health care.

Authored by: Susan J. Popkin for Journal of Housing & Community Development
Topics: Asset building, Dual-generation, Education, Housing, Mental health, Mobility, Partnerships, Research, Workforce development
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 2, 2019
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Publication
Community:
Mar 1, 2019
Released bi-monthly, each issue of the ZERO TO THREE Journal focuses on a critical topic within the early childhood development field. Journal articles are carefully composed to present current knowledge, latest research, and practical advice to help early childhood professionals do their best work in support of infants and toddlers.

Authored by: Zero To Three
Topics: Child welfare, Dual-generation, Early childhood, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Research, Safety
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Mar 26, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Mar 7, 2019
Democrats this week announced new legislation that would slash child poverty by paying low-income parents the kind of monthly allowance that is standard in other developed countries. But the lawmakers who introduced the bill, called the American Family Act, didn’t use the terms “child benefit” or “child allowance” at their Capitol Hill press conference Wednesday. Instead, they all called it a tax credit or a tax cut.

Authored by: Arthur Delaney for HuffPost
Topics: Child welfare, Dual-generation, Early childhood, Funding, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 12, 2019
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Report
Community:
The strengths and abilities children develop from infancy through adolescence are crucial for their physical, emotional, and cognitive growth, which in turn help them to achieve success in school and to become responsible, economically self-sufficient, and healthy adults. Capable, responsible, and healthy adults are clearly the foundation of a well-functioning and prosperous society, yet America’s future is not as secure as it could be because millions of American children live in families with incomes below the poverty line. A wealth of evidence suggests that a lack of adequate economic resources for families with children compromises these children’s ability to grow and achieve adult success, hurting them and the broader society.

Authored by: National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine
Topics: Child welfare, Dual-generation, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 1, 2019
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Report
Community:
Feb 1, 2019
In the summer of 2018, Ascend gathered more than two dozen state and national policy experts and other leaders in the fields of health and early learning at its Aspen Meadows Campus in Aspen, Colorado, to discuss the growing opportunity to leverage the 2Gen approach at the state level and determine how best to take promising new innovations to scale. This report offers a snapshot of specific things federal, state, and local leaders can keep doing, start doing, or stop doing to remove barriers and accelerate success.

Authored by: Ascend: The Aspen Institute
Topics: Dual-generation, Early childhood, Family engagement, Legislation & Policy, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Feb 15, 2019

Aligning and Streamlining Systems to Secure Better Outcomes for Families

Report
Feb 1, 2019
Ascend: The Aspen Institute
In the summer of 2018, Ascend gathered more than two dozen state and national policy experts and other leaders in the fields of health and early learning at its Aspen Meadows Campus in Aspen, Colorado, to discuss the growing opportunity to leverage the 2Gen approach at the state level and determine
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Webinar
Community:
Feb 12, 2019
During CLPHA’s Education Working Group Webinar on addressing school attendance at PHAs, representatives from the King County Housing Authority and the national nonprofit Attendance Works presented on tools for addressing chronic absenteeism, as well as strategies for fostering a culture of attendance among residents.

Authored by: CLPHA, Housing Is
Topics: Attendance, CLPHA, Dual-generation, Education, Housing, Low-income, Metrics, Partnerships, Place-based
Shared by Housing Is on Feb 12, 2019
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Report
Community:
Jan 31, 2019
For a very young child, the relationship with a primary caregiver, most often though not exclusively a mother, lays an important psychological foundation for later flourishing. Successful attachment and bonding in the first two years of life predicts healthy later development on a range of fronts, from mental health to educational skills. When bonding and attachment prove difficult, child development is affected. Recent advances in brain science allow this impact to be shown more clearly and more definitively.

Authored by: Richard V. Reeves for Brookings Institution
Topics: Child welfare, Depression, Dual-generation, Early childhood, Health, Low-income, Mental health, Mobility
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Feb 5, 2019
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Publication
Community:
Jan 7, 2019
Times are changing rapidly for families—our households, work and the workforce do not look like they did just a decade ago. Challenges and barriers for parents continue to grow – skyrocketing costs of health care and child care, lack of flexibility at the workplace, and less time at home. Working parents have to balance their budget and time across an ever-changing landscape of needs: from caring for themselves, their children, and older family members, to affording quality child care and paying household bills. Removing barriers so families can care for their loved ones requires us to rethink and update the supports in place for working parents to keep up with the realities of a changing workforce.

Authored by: Lindsay Broyhill for Ascend: The Aspen Institute
Topics: Child welfare, Dual-generation, Early childhood, Family engagement, Health, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Preventative care
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 31, 2019

Family Prosperity: Value All Care, Value Every Family

Publication
Jan 7, 2019
Lindsay Broyhill for Ascend: The Aspen Institute
Times are changing rapidly for families—our households, work and the workforce do not look like they did just a decade ago. Challenges and barriers for parents continue to grow – skyrocketing costs of health care and child care, lack of flexibility at the workplace, and less time at home.
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Publication
Community:
Jan 1, 2019
A healthy birth and positive experiences in early childhood can promote health and development. One approach that has improved outcomes for children and their parents is home visiting, which provides individually tailored support, resources, and information to expectant parents and families with young children. This brief summarizes recently published reports from two national studies of evidence-based early childhood home visiting: the Mother and Infant Home Visiting Program Evaluation (MIHOPE) and MIHOPE-Strong Start.

Authored by: MDRC
Topics: Child welfare, Dual-generation, Early childhood, Home visiting, Metrics, Partnerships, Place-based, Preventative care, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 31, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Jan 29, 2019
Housing complex would integrate residents with special needs into the larger community

Authored by: Tara Bahrampour for The Washington Post
Topics: Disabilities, Dual-generation, Housing, Mental health, Place-based, Safety
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 31, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Jan 22, 2019
A D.C. housing development serves as a refuge for grandparents raising young children. Is it a model for the rest of the country?

Authored by: Andrew L. Yarrow for The Washington Post
Topics: Child welfare, Dual-generation, East Coast, Family engagement, Low-income, Place-based, Seniors, Stability, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 22, 2019
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Interactive
Community:
Sep 20, 2018
This SchoolHouse Connection series is focused on helping youth experiencing homelessness succeed in college. We highlight best practices for supporting these students from institutions across the country. These are living documents that will be updated regularly to provide new and innovative practices.

Authored by: SchoolHouse Connection
Topics: Dual-generation, Education, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Post-secondary, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 16, 2019
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Publication
Community:
Jan 1, 2019
According to the Institute for Women’s Policy Research, 26% of undergraduate students--about 4.8 million students--are raising dependent children. Students of color are more likely to be parents; additionally, about 70% of parenting students are women. These students are balancing many competing demands: attending classes, keeping up with schoolwork, and caring for children. College and child care are costly, with the average cost of child care ranging between $8,000-$35,000 each year. As a result, parenting students are more likely to experience food and housing insecurity than students who do not have children.

Authored by: SchoolHouse Connection
Topics: Dual-generation, Early childhood, Education, Housing, Partnerships, Post-secondary, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 16, 2019

Helping Homeless Youth Succeed in College: Strategies for Parenting Students

Publication
Jan 1, 2019
SchoolHouse Connection
According to the Institute for Women’s Policy Research, 26% of undergraduate students--about 4.8 million students--are raising dependent children. Students of color are more likely to be parents; additionally, about 70% of parenting students are women.
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Report
Community:
Jan 15, 2019
The Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and Child Tax Credit (CTC) together boosted the incomes of 29.1 million Americans in 2017, lifting 8.9 million above the poverty line and making 20.2 million others less poor, our analysis of new Census data shows.

Authored by: Jennifer Beltran for Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
Topics: Asset building, Dual-generation, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 16, 2019

Working-Family Tax Credits Lifted 8.9 Million People out of Poverty in 2017

Report
Jan 15, 2019
Jennifer Beltran for Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
The Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and Child Tax Credit (CTC) together boosted the incomes of 29.1 million Americans in 2017, lifting 8.9 million above the poverty line and making 20.2 million others less poor, our analysis of new Census data shows.
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News Article
Community:
Jan 10, 2019
Island School is one of 247 “community schools” in New York. These are regular public schools, with a twist. They have longer days and longer school years: Island stays open 12 hours a day, six days a week, including spring and winter breaks as well as the summer. A psychologist makes weekly rounds. A dentist comes by regularly. So does an optometrist, and students who need glasses get them free.

Authored by: David L. Kirk for The New York Times
Topics: Community development, Dual-generation, East Coast, Education, Family engagement, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Mental health, Metrics, Partnerships, Stability, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 10, 2019
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Publication
Community:
Dec 17, 2018
Stricter work requirement policies for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) at the federal level were left out of the recently passed farm bill, but state policymakers are still considering whether to expand or establish their own work requirements for SNAP and Medicaid, with the goal of incentivizing employment. There’s no question that good jobs help spur upward mobility. But if we are serious about helping people work, we have to get serious about helping people improve their skills.

Authored by: Gina Adams and Shayne Spaulding for The Urban Institute
Topics: Child welfare, Cost effectiveness, Dual-generation, Early childhood, Food insecurity, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Research, Stability, Workforce development
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 17, 2018

Work requirement policies must consider parents' need for child care

Publication
Dec 17, 2018
Gina Adams and Shayne Spaulding for The Urban Institute
Stricter work requirement policies for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) at the federal level were left out of the recently passed farm bill, but state policymakers are still considering whether to expand or establish their own work requirements for SNAP and Medicaid, with the goa