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5th Annual Housing Is Summit on May 16-17

Join us for our 5th annual Housing Is Summit on May 16-17, 2019, in Washington, D.C. This unique two-day conference brings together diverse housing, health, and education stakeholders to explore innovative system alignment efforts and develop cross-sector solutions to complex challenges all three sectors face.

Learn More & Register
 

Elements of a Successful Partnership

With generous support from the MacArthur Foundation, CLPHA developed an in-depth report on regional housing-education collaborations taking place at housing authorities across the Pacific-Northwest.

Read the Multimedia Report
 

National Snapshot of PHA-Health Partnerships

The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) provides new data about public housing authorities’ partnerships with the health sector and offers recommendations to encourage collaboration between these affordable housing providers and their health system partners.

Read the Report
 

Register Now: 2019 Housing Is Summit

CLPHA is pleased to announce that renowned physician, epidemiologist, researcher, and activist Dr. Camara Jones will be a keynote speaker at our fifth annual Housing Is Summit in Washington, D.C., May 16-17. Dr. Jones will present on the need to address social determinants of health to reduce health disparities as well as the interdisciplinary nature of a strong safety net.

Register Today
 
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News Article
Community:
Apr 17, 2019
The Trump administration proposed a rule on Wednesday night intended to prevent undocumented immigrants from receiving federal housing assistance, the latest step in its efforts to ramp up enforcement of the nation’s immigration laws.

Authored by: Annie Karni and Michael D. Shear for The New York Times
Topics: Housing, Immigrants, Legislation & Policy
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 18, 2019

HUD Moves to Limit Public Housing Aid for Undocumented Immigrants

News Article
Apr 17, 2019
Annie Karni and Michael D. Shear for The New York Times
The Trump administration proposed a rule on Wednesday night intended to prevent undocumented immigrants from receiving federal housing assistance, the latest step in its efforts to ramp up enforcement of the nation’s immigration laws.
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Publication
Community:
Housing and land use policies have a significant effect on schools, and since these policies are usually decided at the state and local level, educators and education advocates have the opportunity to play a significant role. Housing and land use policies can affect enrollment trends, concentrations of poverty and school diversity, school funding, stability of enrollment vs. “churning” of students, and ability of students to complete their homework and focus during the school day.

Authored by: National Education Association and the Poverty and Race Research Action Council
Topics: Child welfare, Education, Housing, Legislation & Policy
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 18, 2019

Housing and Schools: The Importance of Engagement for Educators and Education Advocates

Publication
National Education Association and the Poverty and Race Research Action Council
Housing and land use policies have a significant effect on schools, and since these policies are usually decided at the state and local level, educators and education advocates have the opportunity to play a significant role.
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Interactive
Community:
Displacement tracts are those showing strong economic expansion and a net decline in low-income population. Concentration tracts are those showing strong economic decline and a net increase in low-income population.

Authored by: Institute on Metropolitan Opportunity at the University of Minnesota Law School
Topics: Community development, Low-income, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 18, 2019

Low Income Displacement and Concentration in U.S. Census Tracts, 2000-2016

Interactive
Institute on Metropolitan Opportunity at the University of Minnesota Law School
Displacement tracts are those showing strong economic expansion and a net decline in low-income population. Concentration tracts are those showing strong economic decline and a net increase in low-income population.
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Report
Community:
Apr 1, 2019
The goal of this report is to reveal those 21st century patterns of metropolitan change and development. Broadly speaking, this report analyzes neighborhood change, at a census-tract and metropolitan level, between 2000 and 2016. Its analysis includes the entire United States but focuses on the 50 largest metropolitan areas.

Authored by: Institute on Metropolitan Opportunity at the University of Minnesota Law School
Topics: Community development, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 18, 2019
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Research
Community:
Nov 27, 2018
A growing body of research suggests that housing eviction is more common than previously recognized and may play an important role in the reproduction of poverty. The proportion of children affected by housing eviction, however, remains largely unknown. We estimate that one in seven children born in large U.S. cities in 1998–2000 experienced at least one eviction for nonpayment of rent or mortgage between birth and age 15. Rates of eviction were substantial across all cities and demographic groups studied, but children from disadvantaged backgrounds were most likely to experience eviction. Among those born into deep poverty, we estimate that approximately one in four were evicted by age 15. Given prior evidence that forced moves have negative consequences for children, we conclude that the high prevalence and social stratification of housing eviction are sufficient to play an important role in the reproduction of poverty and warrant greater policy attention.

Authored by: Ian Lundberg and Louis Donnelly
Topics: Early childhood, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 18, 2019

A Research Note on the Prevalance of Housing Eviction Among Children Born in U.S. Cities

Research
Nov 27, 2018
Ian Lundberg and Louis Donnelly
A growing body of research suggests that housing eviction is more common than previously recognized and may play an important role in the reproduction of poverty. The proportion of children affected by housing eviction, however, remains largely unknown.
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News Article
Community:
Apr 15, 2019
Rapid re-housing was designed for people experiencing homelessness who have a good chance of paying for their own housing after a one-time boost. The Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority, which manages Measure H spending, is using the program to house a much wider segment of the homeless population.

Authored by: Madeleine Brand for KCRW
Topics: Funding, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, West Coast
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 18, 2019
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Publication
Community:
Apr 8, 2019
In 2015, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) prevented 8.4 million people from living in poverty. This essential and effective safety net program helps people with low incomes purchase food for themselves and their families—an estimated 40.8 million Americans were living in poverty in 2015; absent SNAP benefits, that number would have been 49.1 million. Despite its success, SNAP is facing rule changes that would cause people to lose benefits—harming those who need it most and weakening the poverty-fighting power of the program.

Authored by: Anthony Barrows for Ideas 42
Topics: Food insecurity, Health, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Nutrition
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 18, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Apr 11, 2019
A New Hampshire-based college with a large online enrollment plans to open a new operations center in downtown Tucson in early 2020 that will eventually employ up to 350 people.

Authored by: David Wichner for Arizona Daily Star
Topics: Asset building, Post-secondary, Workforce development
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 18, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Apr 4, 2019
Education Design Lab taps four large community colleges in an ambitious effort to raise single-mother completion rate 30 percent at each institution by 2024.

Authored by: Education Design Lab for Ciston PR Newswire
Topics: Dual-generation, Early childhood, Family engagement, Low-income, Metrics, Post-secondary
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 18, 2019
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Publication
Community:
Founded in 1995 as Project Women, Family Scholar House (FSH) provides comprehensive, holistic services for disadvantaged single parents, their children, and foster alumni. The nonprofit seeks to end the cycle of poverty and transform communities by empowering families and youth to succeed in education and life-long self-sufficiency. FSH provides supportive housing, educational programming, and participant advocacy to help families gain independence.

Authored by: American Planning Association
Topics: Dual-generation, Early childhood, Education, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Partnerships, Place-based, Post-secondary, South, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 18, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Mar 13, 2019
Lawmakers are currently considering legislation meant to put some extra cash in the pockets of families like Franson’s. House Bill 1527 and its companion, Senate Bill 5810, would create the Working Families Tax Credit, which supporters say would make Washington’s tax code less regressive while helping households with the rising cost of living. The federal government and other states have similar programs and use rely on income tax returns to distribute credits. Washington has no income tax. If the bill passes, people would apply through the state Employment Security Department, which would determine eligibility and calculate and write checks to those eligible.

Authored by: Jake Thomas for The Columbian
Topics: Asset building, Funding, Legislation & Policy, Low-income
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 18, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Mar 19, 2019
For 17 years, physicians, nurse practitioners and pediatric residents at our hospital, and presently, at more than 80 locations throughout the region, have been participating in Reach Out and Read of Greater Philadelphia (www.reachoutandreadphilly.org), a simple yet profound way to harness the power of a book to potentially alter a child’s health trajectory.

Authored by: Daniel Taylor for The Inquirer
Topics: Early childhood, East Coast, Education, Grade-level proficiency, Health, Literacy, Low-income
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 18, 2019

This Philly pediatrician always prescribes reading to patients and parents. Here's why.

News Article
Mar 19, 2019
Daniel Taylor for The Inquirer
For 17 years, physicians, nurse practitioners and pediatric residents at our hospital, and presently, at more than 80 locations throughout the region, have been participating in Reach Out and Read of Greater Philadelphia (www.reachoutandreadphilly.org), a simple yet profound way to harness the power
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Research
Community:
To what extent is there a mix of incomes within the LIHTC complexes? Is it realistic to expect properties without an explicit mixed-income focus to create and sustain mixed-income communities?

Authored by: Raphael Bostic, Andrew Jakabovics, Richard Voith, and Sean Zielenback
Topics: Housing, Low-income, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 17, 2019

Mixed-Income LIHTC Developments in Chicago: A First Look at Their Income Characteristics and Spillover Impacts

Research
Raphael Bostic, Andrew Jakabovics, Richard Voith, and Sean Zielenback
To what extent is there a mix of incomes within the LIHTC complexes? Is it realistic to expect properties without an explicit mixed-income focus to create and sustain mixed-income communities?
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Publication
Community:
The role of public and nonprofit hospitals and hospital systems in supportive housing is not an obvious one at first glance. Traditionally, the role of nonprofit and public hospitals has been to provide primary healthcare and additional health services to the public, often to select “catchment” areas or neighborhoods. The extent of these institutions’ role in housing was limited to either providing a) short-term inpatient beds for medical or treatment services, or b) residences for nurses or other hospital staff. Why then are more and more nonprofit and public hospitals becoming involved in not only creating, but also providing and managing supportive housing?

Authored by: Richard Cho for CSH
Topics: Health, Homelessness, Housing, Partnerships, Research, Supportive housing
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 17, 2019
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Publication
Community:
April is National Child Abuse Prevention Month, an opportunity to recognize the importance and raise awareness of our roles —families, communities, service providers, researchers, policy makers and others— in working together to prevent child abuse and neglect and to promote the overall social, physical, and emotional well-being of children and their families.

Authored by: Jasmine Hayes for CSH
Topics: Child welfare, Family engagement, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Safety
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 17, 2019

National Child Abuse Prevention Month: Strong and Thriving Families

Publication
Jasmine Hayes for CSH
April is National Child Abuse Prevention Month, an opportunity to recognize the importance and raise awareness of our roles —families, communities, service providers, researchers, policy makers and others— in working together to prevent child abuse and neglect and to promote the overall social, phys
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News Article
Community:
Apr 16, 2019
Grand Rapids, Michigan, is one of the fastest-growing US cities with economic opportunities for businesses. We jumped to the top of polls for the best cities to start a business in 2015 and have maintained top rankings ever since. We also top national lists for best places to call home and raise a family. This does not tell the whole story, though. Communities of color struggle to thrive here. We rank among the worst large US cities for African Americans economically. Almost 40 percent of African Americans in our city live in poverty. They are three times as likely to be unemployed as whites. More than 40 percent of Hispanics and Latinx live in poverty, and they are more than twice as likely to be unemployed.

Authored by: Rosalynn Bliss for Health Affairs
Topics: Asset building, Broadband, Data sharing, Health, Partnerships, Racial inequalities
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 16, 2019

How Grand Rapids, Michigan, Is Using Data To Advance Health Equity and Economic Opportunity

News Article
Apr 16, 2019
Rosalynn Bliss for Health Affairs
Grand Rapids, Michigan, is one of the fastest-growing US cities with economic opportunities for businesses. We jumped to the top of polls for the best cities to start a business in 2015 and have maintained top rankings ever since.
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Video
Community:
Apr 9, 2019
Examine the forgotten history of how our federal, state and local governments unconstitutionally segregated every major metropolitan area in America through law and policy.

Authored by: Mark Lopez and Richard Rothstein for Silkworm Design
Topics: Education, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Racial inequalities
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 16, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Apr 14, 2019
In 2014 Caselli started Haven Connect, which is now based in Austin, to make it easier for property managers to communicate with affordable housing applicants, including those who are and aren’t homeless, and for applicants to update their information online.

Authored by: Anne Field for Forbes
Topics: Broadband, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Partnerships, South
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 16, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Apr 7, 2019
Puerto Rico was in financial distress and had crumbling infrastructure before Hurricane Maria, and many residents complain of government malfeasance that exacerbated the storm’s impact, echoing criticism from Washington. But Puerto Rican leaders say the delay to the Vieques hospital and thousands of other stalled projects is a reflection of unequal treatment from the White House and Congress, which last week failed to pass disaster relief legislation because of a dispute over how much money to send the island.

Authored by: Patricia Mazzei for The New York Times
Topics: Community development, Food insecurity, Funding, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Nutrition, U.S. Territories
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 15, 2019
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Video
Community:
Apr 9, 2019
Recording of U.S. House Financial Services Committee (Subcommittee on Consumer Protection and Financial Institutions) hearing

Authored by: U.S. House Committee on Financial Services
Topics: Housing, Legislation & Policy, Racial inequalities
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 15, 2019
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Report
Community:
Jan 31, 2019
The EMPOWERED study, conducted on behalf of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, examines the use of performance measures, work requirements and child support cooperation requirements across human services programs. This issue brief is based on three case studies and provides local perspectives on the challenges and opportunities for aligning performance indicators across a variety of federal programs promoting self-sufficiency.

Authored by: Elizabeth Brown, Kara Conroy, and Gretchen Kirby for Mathematica
Topics: Legislation & Policy, Metrics, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 15, 2019

Aligning Federal Performance Indicators Across Programs Promoting Self-Sufficiency: Local Perspectives

Report
Jan 31, 2019
Elizabeth Brown, Kara Conroy, and Gretchen Kirby for Mathematica
The EMPOWERED study, conducted on behalf of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, examines the use of performance measures, work requirements and child support cooperation requirements across human services programs.
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Publication
Community:
Apr 12, 2019
In Richmond, Virginia, an interprofessional group of health care students and faculty members is helping seniors solve problems early.

Authored by: T.R. Goldman for Health Affairs
Topics: Dental, Health, Low-income, Mental health, Partnerships, Seniors
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 12, 2019
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Publication
Community:
To better align families’ child welfare and supportive housing needs, child welfare leaders must clearly present their vision for the role of supportive housing as a part of positive child welfare outcomes. State administrators and leaders must consider critical aspects of housing within the Family First IV-E Prevention Program Five-Year State Plan (State Plan) and introduce necessary state policy, legislative, and budgetary changes to ensure that stable, supportive housing is central to long-term family stability and well-being

Authored by: CSH
Topics: Child welfare, Family engagement, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Supportive housing
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 12, 2019
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Publication
Community:
Apr 11, 2019
High-need, high-cost (HNHC) individuals are defined as people of all ages living with clinically complex needs and functional limitations who also incur high health care costs or are likely to do so in the near future. Despite frequent contact with the health care system and substantial medical spending, the physical, social, and behavioral health needs of these individuals often remain unmet due to uncoordinated and fragmented care. Studies suggest that HNHC individuals could benefit from a more holistic approach that coordinates the care they receive and addresses their unmet social needs. Doing so could improve quality of care and quality of life while reducing health care service use

Authored by: Janet Niles, Teresa Litton, and Robert Mechanic for Health Affairs
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Disabilities, Health, Research, Seniors
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 11, 2019

An Initial Assessment of Initiatives to Improve Care for High-Need, High-Cost Individuals in Accountable Care Organizations

Publication
Apr 11, 2019
Janet Niles, Teresa Litton, and Robert Mechanic for Health Affairs
High-need, high-cost (HNHC) individuals are defined as people of all ages living with clinically complex needs and functional limitations who also incur high health care costs or are likely to do so in the near future.
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Report
Community:
Jan 1, 2019
This report focuses on the homelessness and health care use of older homeless adults in New York City, specifically those 55 years of age or older. Recent evidence suggests a unique cohort effect of postWorld War II “baby boomers” born between 1955 and 1965 who have shown a disproportionately high risk of homelessness over the last two decades.

Authored by: Dennis Culhane, Dan Treglia, Randall Kuhn, Kelly Doran, Eileen Johns, and Maryanne Schretzman for Actionable Intelligence for Social Policy
Topics: Cost effectiveness, East Coast, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Research, Seniors
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 11, 2019

A Data-Driven Re-Design of Housing Supports and Services for Aging Adults Who Experience Homelessness in New York City

Report
Jan 1, 2019
Dennis Culhane, Dan Treglia, Randall Kuhn, Kelly Doran, Eileen Johns, and Maryanne Schretzman for Actionable Intelligence for Social Policy
This report focuses on the homelessness and health care use of older homeless adults in New York City, specifically those 55 years of age or older.