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Elements of a Successful Partnership

With generous support from the MacArthur Foundation, CLPHA developed an in-depth report on regional housing-education collaborations taking place at housing authorities across the Pacific-Northwest.

Read the Multimedia Report
 

National Snapshot of PHA-Health Partnerships

The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) provides new data about public housing authorities’ partnerships with the health sector and offers recommendations to encourage collaboration between these affordable housing providers and their health system partners.

Read the Report
 
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Report
Community:
Aug 18, 2021
The just-released America After 3PM special report, “STEM Learning in Afterschool on the Rise, But Barriers and Inequities Exist,” finds that afterschool programs are offering more STEM learning opportunities, but inequities exist and too many young people are missing out.

Authored by: America After 3PM
Topics: Education, Youth
Shared by Jordan Jackson on Aug 19, 2021
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Publication
Community:
Jun 17, 2021

Authored by: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Choice Neighborhoods
Topics: Attendance, COVID-19, Early childhood, Education, Family engagement, Housing, Low-income, Out-of-school time, Youth
Shared by Kirsten Greenwell on Jun 17, 2021
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Video
Community:
May 18, 2021
After over a year of remote learning, everything is out-of-school time at this point. With unknowns about vaccinations for children, communities should prepare for uneven plans across communities for summer and fall 2021. This discussion session focuses on capacity: how to support virtual and hybrid learning, how to counter learning loss, supporting parent engagement, supporting staff to support parents, providing adult socio-emotional learning, and providing connection to services. Panelists will share examples from on the ground, toolkits, and other resources, while also allowing time for small group discussion to share challenges and troubleshoot solutions.

Authored by: CLPHA
Topics: Attendance, Child welfare, Community development, Early childhood, Education, Grade-level proficiency, Out-of-school time, School-readiness, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on May 18, 2021
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Video
Community:
May 18, 2021
Keynote: Michael Bennet (D-Co), Congressional Video Message. Plenary: Reducing Childhood Poverty. Following Housing Is' 2019 Summit discussion of reducing childhood poverty and the idea of a university child allowance, this panel will explore the renewed discussion of legislation around a child tax credit and the idea of a universal basic income.

Authored by: CLPHA
Topics: Child welfare, Community development, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on May 18, 2021
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Podcast
Community:
Nov 23, 2020
“Bending the Arc” explores the everyday work of creating inclusive, equitable and racially just communities. This podcast spotlights bold thinking and action by creative, passionate, experienced thinkers and actors from cities and communities around the US and Canada. In this new episode we talk with Dr. Clinton Boyd, Jr., a Postdoctoral Associate at the Samuel Dubois Cook Center on Social Equity at Duke University. In our conversation we touch on a wide range of topics including our personal journeys as Black fathers, the undervaluing of Black men in general versus the idolizing of Black male athletes and entertainers, and what Clinton has learned from his research, including the Dads2Kids home visiting project. Clinton and Dr. Deirdre Oakley of Georgia State University co-authored an essay for the What Works volume on the role of Black fathers in mixed-income communities.

Authored by: National Initiative on Mixed-Income Communities for CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY
Topics: Advocacy, Community development, Racial inequalities, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 12, 2021

Bending the Arc Podcast: The Connection Between Black Fatherhood and Mixed-Income Communities

Podcast
Nov 23, 2020
National Initiative on Mixed-Income Communities for CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY
“Bending the Arc” explores the everyday work of creating inclusive, equitable and racially just communities. This podcast spotlights bold thinking and action by creative, passionate, experienced thinkers and actors from cities and communities around the US and Canada.
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Report
Community: Youth
Dec 1, 2020
420,000. Based on the new report, "Lost in the Masked Shuffle & Virtual Void: Children and Youth Experiencing Homelessness Amidst the Pandemic" from SchoolHouse Connection and Poverty Solutions at the University of Michigan, that’s how many fewer children and youth experiencing homelessness have been identified and enrolled by schools so far this school year. According to our data and insights - gathered from educators and homeless liaisons across 49 states - the number of children, youth, and families experiencing homelessness has likely increased due to the economic crisis. Yet, because of COVID-19 challenges in identifying children and youth experiencing homelessness, hundreds of thousands may not be getting the education and support they need - from internet access, to housing, to food, to child care. What’s more, only 18% of respondents indicated that federal coronavirus relief education funding provided by the CARES Act is being used to meet the needs of students experiencing homelessness. To break generational cycles of homelessness, we must take swift action to support the increasing number of children, youth, and families in need. Check out our report to learn more and take action. We have included recommendations for Congressional leaders, state and local educational agencies, homeless, housing, food, and other relief agencies, and philanthropic organizations.

Authored by: Poverty Solutions at THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN & SCHOOLHOUSE CONNECTION
Topics: Attendance, Child welfare, Early childhood, Education, Funding, Health, Homelessness, Low-income, Stability, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Dec 1, 2020
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Report
Community: Youth
Nov 3, 2020
As housing costs have escalated and inequities persist across the country, many young people need flexible, empowerment-based investments to get stably housed and onto a path to thriving. To this end, direct financial assistance (“cash transfers”) with other supports offer a promising solution grounded in a robust global evidence base. The circumstances of COVID-19 amplify the importance of developing and evaluating youth-informed approaches to doing things differently. This report shares results and implications of a year-long research and stakeholder engagement process that Chapin Hall conducted in collaboration with Point Source Youth to inform the development of a Direct Cash Transfer Program (DCTP) for youth experiencing homelessness. We look forward to piloting and rigorously evaluating a program based on these findings, starting in NYC.

Authored by: Matthew Morton for CHAPIN HALL AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO
Topics: Community development, Funding, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Nov 3, 2020
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News Article
Community: Youth
Feb 1, 2018
Chicago’s troubling homicide rate could be significantly reduced through a massive increase in state spending for Chicago schools. That's just one of the proposals floated Monday by a prominent University of Chicago economist Jens Ludwig. With a substantial commitment, he says homicides could be reduced by nearly 60 percent. Illinois is dead last when it comes to the percentage of education dollars provided by the state to its cities. Ludwig believes adding $1.7 billion dollars would not only bring Illinois up to the national average, but could substantially reduce gun violence as well. Given the social science evidence on the link between high school graduation and gun violence, that would be about a 30 percent decrease in the homicide rates in the city of Chicago for something that has absolutely nothing to do with the city of Chicago policies.

Authored by: FOX 32 CHICAGO
Topics: Child welfare, Community development, Education, Funding, Legislation & Policy, Preventative care, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Oct 15, 2020
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News Article
Community: Youth
Jun 29, 2017
One Summer Chicago Plus is a jobs program designed to reduce violence and prepare youth living in some of the city’s highest-violence neighborhoods for the labor market. This study was carried out over the summer of 2013 in partnership with the Chicago Department of Family and Support Services. It found that the program, which provided a six-week, minimum-wage job for 25 hours a week, reduced the number of violent-crime arrests for participants by 33 percent over the subsequent year. The One Summer Chicago Plus 2013 study—accompanied by a long-term follow-up of the 2012 program—closely examines the two to three years following the six-week program and finds that the reduction in violent-crime arrests is not driven simply by keeping participants off the streets during the summer. In fact, the decline in violence remains significant when the summer is ignored entirely. Researchers did find, however, that the program had no significant impacts on schooling outcomes or engagement, nor did it have a positive impact on formal labor sector employment for all of the participants after the fact. The authors do note that it is possible that significant labor market effects will develop past the three-year window examined in the study.

Authored by: UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO URBAN LABS
Topics: Child welfare, Community development, Criminal justice, Out-of-school time, Partnerships, Preventative care, Safety, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Oct 15, 2020

Chicago jobs program reduces youth violence, Urban Labs study shows

News Article
Jun 29, 2017
UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO URBAN LABS
One Summer Chicago Plus is a jobs program designed to reduce violence and prepare youth living in some of the city’s highest-violence neighborhoods for the labor market. This study was carried out over the summer of 2013 in partnership with the Chicago Department of Family and Support Services.
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Report
Community: Youth
Nov 4, 2019
The ninth in a series of Research-to-Impact briefs by Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago on understanding and addressing youth homelessness. For the 4.2 million adolescents and young adults who experience some form of homelessness, opportunities to develop and realize their educational aspirations are often disrupted. Missed Opportunities: Education Among Youth and Young Adults Experiencing Homelessness in America highlights research on the intersection between youth homelessness and educational disruption. We learned that young people experiencing family instability and trauma are at increased risk for unstable living situations and interrupted educational experiences. Youth who leave school before graduation were considerably more likely to experience homelessness. Likewise, youth and young adults who experience homelessness were less likely to enroll in college. If we strengthen our educational supports and youth homelessness systems, we can do more than stop missing opportunities; we can ensure that our youth thrive and meet their full potential.

Authored by: CHAPIN HALL AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO
Topics: Attendance, Education, Homelessness, Post-secondary, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Oct 15, 2020

Missed Opportunities: Education Among Youth Experiencing Homelessness in America

Report
Nov 4, 2019
CHAPIN HALL AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO
The ninth in a series of Research-to-Impact briefs by Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago on understanding and addressing youth homelessness. For the 4.2 million adolescents and young adults who experience some form of homelessness, opportunities to develop and realize their educational aspira
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Policy Brief
Community:
Dec 4, 2019
In California, more than 3.7 million students were eligible for free or reduced priced school meals in the 2017-2018 school year. For many of those students, school meals are the primary source of regular access to healthy food. When the bell rings at 3:00 or lets out for summer break, many of those students go home to nutritional uncertainty or high-calorie, low-nutrient foods. For many low-income families, the out-of-school-time food access gap increases family stress: limited budgets are stretched further to cover food, rent, utilities, transportation, medications, and chidcare costs. For very young children, food insecurity can negatively impact brain and physical development. For children of all ages, disrupted access to healthy food can impact behavior, increase risk of obesity, make it harder to concentrate, or exacerbate existing healthy conditions like type 2 diabetes. The impact is not limited to summer, and can lead to a rocky start to the school year, negatively impacting school attendance and students’ ability to effectively participate in school. Read the full brief to learn how public and affordable housing communities can address food insecurity for children and youth with the help of out-of-school-time USDA child nutrition programs.

Authored by:
Topics: Advocacy, Early childhood, Food insecurity, Health, Healthy homes, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Nutrition, Out-of-school time, West Coast, Youth
Shared by Linda Lu on Dec 4, 2019

Keeping Kids Healthy and Engaged When School is Out Through Public and Affordable Housing Communities

Policy Brief
Dec 4, 2019
In California, more than 3.7 million students were eligible for free or reduced priced school meals in the 2017-2018 school year. For many of those students, school meals are the primary source of regular access to healthy food.
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Report
Community:
Jun 6, 2019
Trends in Housing Assistance and Who it Serves

Authored by: PAHRC
Topics: Community development, Disabilities, Education, Funding, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Partnerships, Research, Seniors, Workforce development, Youth
Shared by Keely Stater on Sep 10, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Jun 12, 2019
About half of the student body at one Ohio elementary school has witnessed drug use at home. Educators spend time every day teaching the children how to cope.

Authored by: Dan Levin for The New York Times
Topics: Child welfare, Early childhood, Education, Health, Substance abuse, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Jun 13, 2019
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Webinar
Community:
Jun 11, 2019
CLPHA’s Education Working Group convened on Tuesday, June 11 to learn about one of the Housing Authority of Kansas City’s (HAKC) newest housing communities: Pemberton Park, a subsidized apartment building that serves grandparents caring for grandchildren. Representatives from HAKC and their partners discussed the process of establishing the grand-family complex, as well as challenges and successes they experienced along the way.

Authored by: CLPHA, Housing Is
Topics: Education, Family engagement, Housing, Low-income, Partnerships, Seniors, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Jun 11, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Recognizing that the aging of its population will reshape housing needs, the city of Washington, DC, has fostered numerous options for older residents, including some that are intentionally multigenerational.

Authored by: PD&R Edge Online Magazine
Topics: Early childhood, Family engagement, Housing, Low-income, Seniors, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Jun 11, 2019
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Publication
Community:
Jun 11, 2019
Authored by Civic and the Everyone Graduates Center at the Johns Hopkins University School of Education, and released annually in partnership with the Alliance for Excellent Education and America’s Promise Alliance, the Building a Grad Nation report examines both progress and challenges toward reaching the GradNation campaign goal of a national on-time graduation rate of 90 percent.

Authored by: Civic and the Everyone Graduates Center at Johns Hopkins University School of Education
Topics: Education, Low-income, Research, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Jun 11, 2019

2019 Building A Grad Nation: Progress and Challenge in Raising High School Graduation Rates

Publication
Jun 11, 2019
Civic and the Everyone Graduates Center at Johns Hopkins University School of Education
Authored by Civic and the Everyone Graduates Center at the Johns Hopkins University School of Education, and released annually in partnership with the Alliance for Excellent Education and America’s Promise Alliance, the Building a Grad Nation report examines both progress and challenges toward reach
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Publication
Community:
May 1, 2019
Navigating college as a first-generation college student can feel like making your way through a maze with no map, filled with “learn as you go” lessons, and “wow, I wish I knew this then.” When you combine it with being low-income, homeless, and/or food insecure, it can feel like you’re navigating the same maze blindfolded, on a tightrope, balancing multiple responsibilities. It should not be like this.

Authored by: Miguel Arellano Sanchez for SchoolHouse Connection
Topics: Low-income, Post-secondary, Stability, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on May 29, 2019

Tricks of the Trade: Advice from a Higher Education Basic Needs Navigator

Publication
May 1, 2019
Miguel Arellano Sanchez for SchoolHouse Connection
Navigating college as a first-generation college student can feel like making your way through a maze with no map, filled with “learn as you go” lessons, and “wow, I wish I knew this then.” When you combine it with being low-income, homeless, and/or food insecure, it can feel like you’re navigating
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Research
Community:
May 21, 2019
The Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) was first developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in 1990 to assess the health risk behaviors of youth and adults in the United States. For the first time since the survey has been widely administered, the 2017 YRBS optional question list included two questions pertaining to homelessness. SchoolHouse Connection analyzed demographic and risk factor data from the YRBS in 17 states[1], comparing high school students experiencing homelessness and those not experiencing homelessness. This series shares the striking and heartbreaking results of that analysis, with tangible action steps schools can take to promote safety and health for students experiencing homelessness.

Authored by: SchoolHouse Connection
Topics: Education, Homelessness, Low-income, Research, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on May 21, 2019
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Webinar
Community:
Mar 1, 2017
This webinar explored strategies for leveraging data to support college and career readiness and success (CCRS) goals for all students, with special emphasis on students in foster care. With access to quality data, education and child welfare agencies can work together to improve educational outcomes and promote CCRS for students in foster care. Presenters discussed a set of emerging practices that serve as examples of how states can use and link data to support CCRS. As states work to fulfill the requirements of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), this webinar also aims to provide concrete strategies to leverage the data collection and reporting requirements related to students in foster care to achieve CCRS goals.

Authored by: American Youth Policy Forum
Topics: Asset building, Foster care, Post-secondary, Workforce development, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on May 21, 2019
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Webinar
Community:
Explains the provisions in the Family First Prevention Services Act related to reducing reliance on congregate care and explores approaches to achieve this goal. This webinar includes a summary of the provisions and examples from agencies that have successfully reduced the number of children in group care. Presenters from child welfare agencies in Connecticut and Oklahoma share strategies used to increase the number of children who safely remain with their families or in the least restrictive, most family-like setting.

Authored by: Child Welfare Capacity Building Collaborative (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families)
Topics: Child welfare, Foster care, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on May 21, 2019
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Report
Community:
Dec 11, 2018
This report highlights the development and implementation of a mentoring program for college students in foster care in New York City through a strategic partnership that was forged among New York City’s Administration for Children’s Services, Goldman Sachs and Casey Family Programs. The program is designed to expose youth to professional and experiential opportunities through a series of one-on-one meetings and group workshops. Students have the opportunity to become familiar with the Goldman Sachs corporate environment, understand various business sectors and explore the roles and responsibilities of different jobs, as well as receive hands-on support with job applications and interviewing.

Authored by: Casey Family Programs
Topics: Child welfare, Foster care, Partnerships, Research, Workforce development, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on May 21, 2019

A public-private mentoring partnership to build a better tomorrow for youth in foster care

Report
Dec 11, 2018
Casey Family Programs
This report highlights the development and implementation of a mentoring program for college students in foster care in New York City through a strategic partnership that was forged among New York City’s Administration for Children’s Services, Goldman Sachs and Casey Family Programs.
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Research
Community:
Mar 14, 2019
Despite abundant evidence about the effect of children’s socioeconomic circumstances on their transition to adulthood, we know much less about the effect of social policy programs aimed at poor families with children in facilitating how and when children become adults. This issue is particularly important for the U.S. federal subsidized housing program given its long history of placing subsidized units in some of the poorest and most racially segregated neighborhoods. Using counterfactual causal methods that adjust for the length of receipt of subsidized housing, I estimate the effect of subsidized housing on teenage parenthood, household formation, and educational attainment. I find that the subsidized housing program has either null or positive effects on the transition to adulthood and that these effects vary by both race and gender. These results underscore the importance of considering whether social programs have differential effects on the life chances of individuals based on both race and gender.

Authored by: Yana Kucheva for Demography
Topics: Homelessness, Housing, Racial inequalities, Research, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on May 20, 2019
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News Article
Community:
May 15, 2019
Other cities have combined books and subsidized housing, but the outgoing mayor, Rahm Emanuel, has embraced the concept with three striking new projects.

Authored by: Michael Kimmelman for The New York Times
Topics: Housing, Literacy, Low-income, Midwest, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on May 15, 2019
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Video
Community:
May 9, 2019
On May 9, the Brookings Institution hosted an event to discuss the subsequent report, “A Roadmap to Reducing Child Poverty.” The event featured comments from Greg Duncan, who served as Chair of the Committee on Building an Agenda to Reduce the Number of Children in Poverty by Half in 10 Years, as well as a panel discussion on the report, its recommendations, and barriers to implementation. A second panel highlighted national and state policy perspectives of the consensus study report.

Authored by: The Brookings Institution
Topics: Early childhood, Funding, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Research, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on May 13, 2019
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News Article
Community:
May 3, 2019
That’s according to the fourth and largest survey of college students’ ability to afford food and housing

Authored by: Jillian Berman for Market Watch
Topics: Food insecurity, Low-income, Nutrition, Post-secondary, Research, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on May 6, 2019