Welcome to Housing Is, a hub for generating effective programs and sharing innovative ideas.

Sign Up or Sign In
 

Elements of a Successful Partnership

With generous support from the MacArthur Foundation, CLPHA developed an in-depth report on regional housing-education collaborations taking place at housing authorities across the Pacific-Northwest.

Read the Multimedia Report
 

National Snapshot of PHA-Health Partnerships

The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) provides new data about public housing authorities’ partnerships with the health sector and offers recommendations to encourage collaboration between these affordable housing providers and their health system partners.

Read the Report
 
0
0
0
0
Podcast
Community:
Jun 16, 2021
The social determinants of health are interactive and multi-faceted, but often the experts who address them are siloed—as are their data. How do we share the data that can tell us the full story about the people who rely on—and receive—support? Chris Tappan and Lori Hunter discuss data systems, collaboration between agencies, and the vital importance of equitable services in this latest episode of The Intersect.

Authored by: Eric Tischler, Chris Tappan, and Lori Hunter with ABT Associates
Topics: Child welfare, COVID-19, Data sharing, Health
Shared by Camille Anoll on Jun 25, 2021

Reaching Equity: Data, Collaboration, and the Social Determinants of Health

Podcast
Jun 16, 2021
Eric Tischler, Chris Tappan, and Lori Hunter with ABT Associates
The social determinants of health are interactive and multi-faceted, but often the experts who address them are siloed—as are their data. How do we share the data that can tell us the full story about the people who rely on—and receive—support?
0
0
0
0
Video
Community:
May 20, 2021
Based off of data that Ohio has high rates of infant mortality, housing authorities there are working to address this concern, which disproportionately affects people of color. Under different initiatives, the Akron and Columbus Metropolitan Housing Authorities collaborate with cross-sector partners like mayor’s offices and public health officials to improve outcomes. Panelists will describe their efforts, tactics to reach at-risk families, and ways to fund the work.

Authored by: CLPHA
Topics: Advocacy, Child welfare, Community development, Health, Healthy homes, Legislation & Policy, Pre-natal, Racial inequalities
Shared by Housing Is on May 20, 2021
0
0
0
0
Video
Community:
May 18, 2021
After over a year of remote learning, everything is out-of-school time at this point. With unknowns about vaccinations for children, communities should prepare for uneven plans across communities for summer and fall 2021. This discussion session focuses on capacity: how to support virtual and hybrid learning, how to counter learning loss, supporting parent engagement, supporting staff to support parents, providing adult socio-emotional learning, and providing connection to services. Panelists will share examples from on the ground, toolkits, and other resources, while also allowing time for small group discussion to share challenges and troubleshoot solutions.

Authored by: CLPHA
Topics: Attendance, Child welfare, Community development, Early childhood, Education, Grade-level proficiency, Out-of-school time, School-readiness, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on May 18, 2021
0
0
0
0
Video
Community:
May 18, 2021
Keynote: Michael Bennet (D-Co), Congressional Video Message. Plenary: Reducing Childhood Poverty. Following Housing Is' 2019 Summit discussion of reducing childhood poverty and the idea of a university child allowance, this panel will explore the renewed discussion of legislation around a child tax credit and the idea of a universal basic income.

Authored by: CLPHA
Topics: Child welfare, Community development, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on May 18, 2021
0
0
0
0
Policy Brief
Community: Postsecondary
Nov 1, 2020
Colleges support students with advising, counseling, or coaching in academics and other skills they need to succeed in school. Some colleges enhance those services through reduced adviser caseloads and more comprehensive, frequent guidance, which can improve students’ semester-to-semester retention and average credits earned. This overview describes important lessons on designing and implementing those services. College leaders and administrators committed to designing, building, managing, and continually supporting enhanced advising services can consult this checklist of recommendations as they redesign or enhance these services — as stand-alone services or as part of multifaceted interventions.

Authored by: Andrea Vasquez & Susan Scrivener for MDRC
Topics: Attendance, Child welfare, Community development, Education, Grade-level proficiency, Post-secondary, Workforce development
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 4, 2021
0
0
0
0
Report
Community: Youth
Dec 1, 2020
420,000. Based on the new report, "Lost in the Masked Shuffle & Virtual Void: Children and Youth Experiencing Homelessness Amidst the Pandemic" from SchoolHouse Connection and Poverty Solutions at the University of Michigan, that’s how many fewer children and youth experiencing homelessness have been identified and enrolled by schools so far this school year. According to our data and insights - gathered from educators and homeless liaisons across 49 states - the number of children, youth, and families experiencing homelessness has likely increased due to the economic crisis. Yet, because of COVID-19 challenges in identifying children and youth experiencing homelessness, hundreds of thousands may not be getting the education and support they need - from internet access, to housing, to food, to child care. What’s more, only 18% of respondents indicated that federal coronavirus relief education funding provided by the CARES Act is being used to meet the needs of students experiencing homelessness. To break generational cycles of homelessness, we must take swift action to support the increasing number of children, youth, and families in need. Check out our report to learn more and take action. We have included recommendations for Congressional leaders, state and local educational agencies, homeless, housing, food, and other relief agencies, and philanthropic organizations.

Authored by: Poverty Solutions at THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN & SCHOOLHOUSE CONNECTION
Topics: Attendance, Child welfare, Early childhood, Education, Funding, Health, Homelessness, Low-income, Stability, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Dec 1, 2020
0
0
0
0
News Article
Community: Youth
Feb 1, 2018
Chicago’s troubling homicide rate could be significantly reduced through a massive increase in state spending for Chicago schools. That's just one of the proposals floated Monday by a prominent University of Chicago economist Jens Ludwig. With a substantial commitment, he says homicides could be reduced by nearly 60 percent. Illinois is dead last when it comes to the percentage of education dollars provided by the state to its cities. Ludwig believes adding $1.7 billion dollars would not only bring Illinois up to the national average, but could substantially reduce gun violence as well. Given the social science evidence on the link between high school graduation and gun violence, that would be about a 30 percent decrease in the homicide rates in the city of Chicago for something that has absolutely nothing to do with the city of Chicago policies.

Authored by: FOX 32 CHICAGO
Topics: Child welfare, Community development, Education, Funding, Legislation & Policy, Preventative care, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Oct 15, 2020
0
0
0
0
News Article
Community: Youth
Jun 29, 2017
One Summer Chicago Plus is a jobs program designed to reduce violence and prepare youth living in some of the city’s highest-violence neighborhoods for the labor market. This study was carried out over the summer of 2013 in partnership with the Chicago Department of Family and Support Services. It found that the program, which provided a six-week, minimum-wage job for 25 hours a week, reduced the number of violent-crime arrests for participants by 33 percent over the subsequent year. The One Summer Chicago Plus 2013 study—accompanied by a long-term follow-up of the 2012 program—closely examines the two to three years following the six-week program and finds that the reduction in violent-crime arrests is not driven simply by keeping participants off the streets during the summer. In fact, the decline in violence remains significant when the summer is ignored entirely. Researchers did find, however, that the program had no significant impacts on schooling outcomes or engagement, nor did it have a positive impact on formal labor sector employment for all of the participants after the fact. The authors do note that it is possible that significant labor market effects will develop past the three-year window examined in the study.

Authored by: UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO URBAN LABS
Topics: Child welfare, Community development, Criminal justice, Out-of-school time, Partnerships, Preventative care, Safety, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Oct 15, 2020

Chicago jobs program reduces youth violence, Urban Labs study shows

News Article
Jun 29, 2017
UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO URBAN LABS
One Summer Chicago Plus is a jobs program designed to reduce violence and prepare youth living in some of the city’s highest-violence neighborhoods for the labor market. This study was carried out over the summer of 2013 in partnership with the Chicago Department of Family and Support Services.
0
0
0
0
Report
Community:
Nov 7, 2019
How Housing Programs Can Support the Educational Needs of Children Living in Publicly Supported Homes

Authored by: Public and Affordable Housing Research Corporation
Topics: Attendance, Broadband, Child welfare, Early childhood, Health, Housing, Literacy, Low-income, Out-of-school time, Partnerships, Place-based, Research, School-readiness
Shared by Kelly McElwain on Nov 7, 2019
0
0
0
0
News Article
Community:
Jun 12, 2019
About half of the student body at one Ohio elementary school has witnessed drug use at home. Educators spend time every day teaching the children how to cope.

Authored by: Dan Levin for The New York Times
Topics: Child welfare, Early childhood, Education, Health, Substance abuse, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Jun 13, 2019
0
0
0
0
Publication
Community:
Jun 11, 2019
The Trump Administration is publicly weighing plans to gradually lower the official poverty line by applying a smaller cost-of-living adjustment each year. Doing so would be unjustified for several reasons.

Authored by: Arloc Sherman and Paul Van de Water for The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
Topics: Child welfare, Food insecurity, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Nutrition, Stability
Shared by Housing Is on Jun 11, 2019

Reducing Cost-of-Living Adjustment Would Make Poverty Line a Less Accurate Measure of Basic Needs

Publication
Jun 11, 2019
Arloc Sherman and Paul Van de Water for The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
The Trump Administration is publicly weighing plans to gradually lower the official poverty line by applying a smaller cost-of-living adjustment each year. Doing so would be unjustified for several reasons.
0
0
0
0
News Article
Community:
Jun 5, 2019
In the United States, more than 2.7 million grandparents report that they’re primarily responsible for their grandchildren under 18. The problem is many are struggling with food insecurity because of federal rules and regulations.

Authored by: Marie C. Gualtieri for Next Avenue
Topics: Child welfare, Food insecurity, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Nutrition
Shared by Housing Is on Jun 11, 2019
0
0
0
0
Report
Community:
May 1, 2019
Community eligibility allows high-poverty schools and school districts to offer free meals to all students, and it eliminates the need for household school meal applications. A key piece of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010, community eligibility was phased in a few states at a time before it was made available to schools nationwide in the 2014–2015 school year.

Authored by: Food Research & Action Center (FRAC)
Topics: Child welfare, Education, Food insecurity, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Nutrition, Out-of-school time, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Jun 3, 2019
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
May 30, 2019
Children experiencing homelessness or living in inadequate and unstable housing are exposed to many risks, including a heightened threat of involvement with the child welfare system. Can child welfare agencies play a role in addressing the lack of affordable housing? What if providing housing, plus other supportive services, could prevent out-of-home placements to foster care? What if, for those children already in foster care, it could help them reunify with their parents?

Authored by: Mary K. Cunningham, Mike Pergamit, and Sarah Gillespie for The Urban Institute
Topics: Child welfare, Research, Stability, Supportive housing
Shared by Housing Is on May 30, 2019

Supportive Housing Can Help Keep Families Together

Research
May 30, 2019
Mary K. Cunningham, Mike Pergamit, and Sarah Gillespie for The Urban Institute
Children experiencing homelessness or living in inadequate and unstable housing are exposed to many risks, including a heightened threat of involvement with the child welfare system. Can child welfare agencies play a role in addressing the lack of affordable housing?
0
0
0
0
Report
Community:
Apr 25, 2019
Access to affordable child care can be a major barrier for low-income parents who want to participate in education and training activities to gain skills or obtain employment. Child care assistance from the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF), the federal block grant that funds states to provide child care assistance to low-income families, can help alleviate this barrier and make it easier for low-income parents to participate in activities that improve their skills and lead to stable employment with adequate pay. However, the CCDF eligibility requirements and priorities for service are set at the state level, and states make different decisions about how to allocate scarce CCDF resources, so access to and use of CCDF subsidies for parents seeking education and training varies across states.

Authored by: Semhar Gebrekristos and Gina Adams for The Urban Institute
Topics: Child welfare, Early childhood, Education, Legislation & Policy, Post-secondary, Research, Workforce development
Shared by Housing Is on May 30, 2019
0
0
0
0
News Article
Community:
Mar 18, 2019
It’s a prescription guaranteed to develop healthy brains, refine motor skills and prepare kids for school, doctors say. But few parents expect a physician to hand their children a book at their first wellness checkup at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus.

Authored by: Alissa Widman Neese for The Columbus Dispatch
Topics: Child welfare, Early childhood, Education, Health, Literacy, Low-income, Partnerships
Shared by Housing Is on May 30, 2019

Children's books handed out in medical offices to introduce kids to reading

News Article
Mar 18, 2019
Alissa Widman Neese for The Columbus Dispatch
It’s a prescription guaranteed to develop healthy brains, refine motor skills and prepare kids for school, doctors say. But few parents expect a physician to hand their children a book at their first wellness checkup at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus.
0
0
0
0
Report
Community:
May 1, 2019
Child poverty is an urgent and preventable crisis. Solutions to child poverty already exist if we just expand and invest in them. Benefits like nutrition assistance, housing vouchers and tax credits helped lift nearly 7 million children out of poverty in 2017, but millions of children were left behind due to inadequate funding, eligibility restrictions and low wages. We can and must fix these problems to help more children escape poverty now.

Authored by: Children's Defense Fund
Topics: Child welfare, Dual-generation, Early childhood, Food insecurity, Funding, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Research, Workforce development
Shared by Housing Is on May 28, 2019
0
0
0
0
Video
Community:
May 24, 2019
A landmark National Academies of Sciences report commissioned by Congress concludes that childhood poverty in the U.S. could be cut in half within a decade with appropriate action. The report culls through the existing evidence-base to identify the most impactful existing policies including the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and housing assistance. This panel will also discuss promising new policies that if enacted could help reduce poverty such as the child allowance.

Authored by: Housing Is, CLPHA
Topics: Child welfare, CLPHA, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Partnerships, Research
Shared by Housing Is on May 24, 2019
0
0
0
0
Video
Community:
May 24, 2019
Congresswoman Barbara Lee, long-serving progressive leader and member of the Budget and Appropriations Committee, and Co-Chair of the Democratic Policy and Steering Committee, will give remarks on congressional efforts to reduce child poverty.

Authored by: Housing Is, CLPHA
Topics: Child welfare, CLPHA, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Partnerships
Shared by Housing Is on May 24, 2019
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Early childhood education programs can impact life outcomes in ways that span generations, according to new research from Nobel laureate James Heckman. In a pair of companion papers released this week, the pioneering University of Chicago economist found that the children of those who participated in a landmark 1960s study still saw improvements in education, health and employment. The children saw such benefits without participating in the same preschool program as their parents—suggesting that early education can contribute to lasting upward mobility and help break cycles of poverty

Authored by: Professor James Heckman and Ganesh Karapakula
Topics: Child welfare, Dual-generation, Early childhood, Family engagement, Research
Shared by Housing Is on May 21, 2019
0
0
0
0
Webinar
Community:
Explains the provisions in the Family First Prevention Services Act related to reducing reliance on congregate care and explores approaches to achieve this goal. This webinar includes a summary of the provisions and examples from agencies that have successfully reduced the number of children in group care. Presenters from child welfare agencies in Connecticut and Oklahoma share strategies used to increase the number of children who safely remain with their families or in the least restrictive, most family-like setting.

Authored by: Child Welfare Capacity Building Collaborative (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families)
Topics: Child welfare, Foster care, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on May 21, 2019
0
0
0
0
Report
Community:
Dec 11, 2018
This report highlights the development and implementation of a mentoring program for college students in foster care in New York City through a strategic partnership that was forged among New York City’s Administration for Children’s Services, Goldman Sachs and Casey Family Programs. The program is designed to expose youth to professional and experiential opportunities through a series of one-on-one meetings and group workshops. Students have the opportunity to become familiar with the Goldman Sachs corporate environment, understand various business sectors and explore the roles and responsibilities of different jobs, as well as receive hands-on support with job applications and interviewing.

Authored by: Casey Family Programs
Topics: Child welfare, Foster care, Partnerships, Research, Workforce development, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on May 21, 2019

A public-private mentoring partnership to build a better tomorrow for youth in foster care

Report
Dec 11, 2018
Casey Family Programs
This report highlights the development and implementation of a mentoring program for college students in foster care in New York City through a strategic partnership that was forged among New York City’s Administration for Children’s Services, Goldman Sachs and Casey Family Programs.
0
0
0
0
Publication
Community:
May 14, 2019
For many students experiencing homelessness, school is the only place of stability in their lives. Teachers play a crucial role in creating a classroom environment that is safe and supportive for all students, especially those who are highly mobile and have experienced the trauma that often accompanies homelessness. Here, we provide information and strategies that teachers and support staff can use to support the educational success of students experiencing homelessness.

Authored by: SchoolHouse Connection
Topics: Child welfare, Education, Homelessness, Housing
Shared by Housing Is on May 15, 2019
0
0
0
0
Policy Brief
Community:
May 9, 2019
On May 9, the House Appropriations Committee passed its FY2020 appropriations bill for Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education. The House bill includes $100 million in FY2020 funding for the McKinney-Vento Act’s Education for Homeless Children and Youth (EHCY) program. This represents a 7% increase over the FY2019 level; if enacted, it would represent a 30% increase in EHCY funding since FY2017.

Authored by: SchoolHouse Connection
Topics: Child welfare, Funding, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy
Shared by Housing Is on May 15, 2019

House Committee Approves Funding Increase for Homeless Children and Youth

Policy Brief
May 9, 2019
SchoolHouse Connection
On May 9, the House Appropriations Committee passed its FY2020 appropriations bill for Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education. The House bill includes $100 million in FY2020 funding for the McKinney-Vento Act’s Education for Homeless Children and Youth (EHCY) program.
0
0
0
0
Publication
Community:
May 14, 2019
Low- and moderate-income families in Puerto Rico would get a significant income boost from the Working Families Tax Relief Act, which would substantially expand the Child Tax Credit (CTC) in Puerto Rico as well as nationally and also help the Commonwealth expand its own, recently implemented Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC). The bill, which Senators Sherrod Brown, Michael Bennet, Richard Durbin, and Ron Wyden introduced recently, would reduce poverty and increase economic security for millions of working families in the United States, including Puerto Rico.

Authored by: Javier Balmaceda for The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
Topics: Child welfare, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, U.S. Territories
Shared by Housing Is on May 15, 2019

Working Families Tax Relief Act Would Help Puerto Rico Families

Publication
May 14, 2019
Javier Balmaceda for The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
Low- and moderate-income families in Puerto Rico would get a significant income boost from the Working Families Tax Relief Act, which would substantially expand the Child Tax Credit (CTC) in Puerto Rico as well as nationally and also help the Commonwealth expand its own, recently implemented Earned