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6th Annual Housing Is Summit April 30 & May 1

Register now to join practitioners, policymakers, executives, and researchers gathered in Washington, D.C., for CLPHA’s sixth annual Housing Is Summit, an event highlighting collaboration among the housing, education, and health sectors.

Get more info and register now!
 

Elements of a Successful Partnership

With generous support from the MacArthur Foundation, CLPHA developed an in-depth report on regional housing-education collaborations taking place at housing authorities across the Pacific-Northwest.

Read the Multimedia Report
 

National Snapshot of PHA-Health Partnerships

The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) provides new data about public housing authorities’ partnerships with the health sector and offers recommendations to encourage collaboration between these affordable housing providers and their health system partners.

Read the Report
 

Housing Is Summit 2019: Keynote Recap

Day Two of this year's Housing Is Summit began with an electrifying keynote by Dr. Camara Jones, a renowned epidemiologist and public health leader, who talked about the role of "social determinants of inequity" as they relate to health disparities and disparities in other key outcomes. 

View summary and video recording of Dr. Jones' keynote.
 
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News Article
Community:
May 21, 2019
Food is necessary to live, remain healthy, and work. The Improving Access to Nutrition Act, introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives by Rep. Barbara Lee (D-Calif.) May 16, would keep food on the tables of people struggling to find quality employment—instead of leaving them to find a job on an empty stomach.

Authored by: Elizabeth Lower-Basch and Parker Gilkesson for The Hill
Topics: Asset building, Food insecurity, Nutrition, Stability
Shared by Housing Is on May 28, 2019
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Video
Community:
May 21, 2019
On May 21, 2019, the Center for Universal Education and the Future of the Middle Class Initiative at Brookings co-hosted a symposium titled “Building the workforce of the future: Resilient people and places.” Policymakers, practitioners, researchers, and thought leaders from the government, corporate, and nonprofit sectors convened to discuss education and economic development strategies that can provide locally relevant solutions to enhance economic and social mobility.

Authored by: The Brookings Institution
Topics: Asset building, Low-income, Workforce development
Shared by Housing Is on May 28, 2019

Building the workforce of the future: Resilient people and places

Video
May 21, 2019
The Brookings Institution
On May 21, 2019, the Center for Universal Education and the Future of the Middle Class Initiative at Brookings co-hosted a symposium titled “Building the workforce of the future: Resilient people and places.” Policymakers, practitioners, researchers, and thought leaders from the government, corporat
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Report
Community:
May 21, 2019
Although today’s U.S. labor market is strong and unemployment is low, many working-age American remain marginalized. As communities across the country grapple with the challenges of an ever-evolving labor market, this report provides a framework for local leaders to grow good jobs through industrial development strategies that are based on their regions’ unique capabilities.

Authored by: Marcela Escobari, Ian Seyal, Jose Morales-Arilla, and Chad Shearer for The Brookings Institution
Topics: Asset building, Community development, Legislation & Policy, Workforce development
Shared by Housing Is on May 24, 2019
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Webinar
Community:
Mar 1, 2017
This webinar explored strategies for leveraging data to support college and career readiness and success (CCRS) goals for all students, with special emphasis on students in foster care. With access to quality data, education and child welfare agencies can work together to improve educational outcomes and promote CCRS for students in foster care. Presenters discussed a set of emerging practices that serve as examples of how states can use and link data to support CCRS. As states work to fulfill the requirements of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), this webinar also aims to provide concrete strategies to leverage the data collection and reporting requirements related to students in foster care to achieve CCRS goals.

Authored by: American Youth Policy Forum
Topics: Asset building, Foster care, Post-secondary, Workforce development, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on May 21, 2019
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Webinar
Community:
May 16, 2019
Puerto Rico faces enormous challenges due to its history as a colony, the state of its finances, and the devastation caused by Hurricane Maria and the US response to it. This has created a will to rebuild the island’s economy in line with a more community-owned vision. In this webinar, we hear from a number of people involved in and leading that effort.

Authored by: Steve Dubb for NPQ
Topics: Asset building, Community development, U.S. Territories
Shared by Housing Is on May 20, 2019
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Policy Brief
Community:
May 2, 2019
Spring is in full bloom in Washington, D.C., and so are key pieces of legislation that FRAC is monitoring and weighing in on. Below is an overview of legislative proposals in the 116th Congress to look out for that would impact critical anti-hunger and anti-poverty programs.

Authored by: Lauren Badger for Food Research & Action Center
Topics: Asset building, Food insecurity, Legislation & Policy, Nutrition, Seniors
Shared by Housing Is on May 6, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Apr 26, 2019
Raising the minimum wage helps low-paid workers without damaging the broader economy, the authors of two new research papers find.

Authored by: Richard Florida for City Lab
Topics: Asset building, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Research
Shared by Housing Is on May 6, 2019
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Research
Community:
Apr 16, 2019
This report presents a case study of the Chicago Housing Authority’s (CHA’s) work requirement policy, one of a small number of work requirements implemented by housing authorities. The report describes the CHA work requirement, the policy’s implementation and how it has changed, and perceptions of implementation and outcomes from key CHA and service provider staff and residents. The CHA work requirement has been in place for nearly 10 years, allowing us to analyze implementation over time and outcomes.

Authored by: Diane K. Levy, Leiha Edmonds, Samantha Batko, and Marcus Gaddy for The Urban Institute
Topics: Asset building, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Midwest, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 23, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Apr 11, 2019
A New Hampshire-based college with a large online enrollment plans to open a new operations center in downtown Tucson in early 2020 that will eventually employ up to 350 people.

Authored by: David Wichner for Arizona Daily Star
Topics: Asset building, Post-secondary, Workforce development
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 18, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Mar 13, 2019
Lawmakers are currently considering legislation meant to put some extra cash in the pockets of families like Franson’s. House Bill 1527 and its companion, Senate Bill 5810, would create the Working Families Tax Credit, which supporters say would make Washington’s tax code less regressive while helping households with the rising cost of living. The federal government and other states have similar programs and use rely on income tax returns to distribute credits. Washington has no income tax. If the bill passes, people would apply through the state Employment Security Department, which would determine eligibility and calculate and write checks to those eligible.

Authored by: Jake Thomas for The Columbian
Topics: Asset building, Funding, Legislation & Policy, Low-income
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 18, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Apr 16, 2019
Grand Rapids, Michigan, is one of the fastest-growing US cities with economic opportunities for businesses. We jumped to the top of polls for the best cities to start a business in 2015 and have maintained top rankings ever since. We also top national lists for best places to call home and raise a family. This does not tell the whole story, though. Communities of color struggle to thrive here. We rank among the worst large US cities for African Americans economically. Almost 40 percent of African Americans in our city live in poverty. They are three times as likely to be unemployed as whites. More than 40 percent of Hispanics and Latinx live in poverty, and they are more than twice as likely to be unemployed.

Authored by: Rosalynn Bliss for Health Affairs
Topics: Asset building, Broadband, Data sharing, Health, Partnerships, Racial inequalities
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 16, 2019

How Grand Rapids, Michigan, Is Using Data To Advance Health Equity and Economic Opportunity

News Article
Apr 16, 2019
Rosalynn Bliss for Health Affairs
Grand Rapids, Michigan, is one of the fastest-growing US cities with economic opportunities for businesses. We jumped to the top of polls for the best cities to start a business in 2015 and have maintained top rankings ever since.
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News Article
Community:
Apr 3, 2019
The Department of Housing and Urban Development issued a proposed rule Wednesday to improve its Section 3 Program, which requires funding recipients to employ low-income people and business.

Authored by: Jessica Guerin for Housing Wire
Topics: Asset building, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Metrics, Place-based, Workforce development
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 8, 2019
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News Article
Community:
A living wage is an antidepressant. It is a sleep aid. A diet. A stress reliever. It is a contraceptive, preventing teenage pregnancy It prevents premature death. It shields children from neglect.

Authored by: Matthew Desmond for The New York Times Magazine
Topics: Asset building, Legislation & Policy, Low-income
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 4, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Feb 5, 2019
Building more affordable housing units in the metros that are centers of innovation will increase demand for the wares that fill houses, and increase productivity.

Authored by: Richard Floriday for City Lab
Topics: Asset building, Community development, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 4, 2019
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Policy Brief
Community:
Mar 1, 2019
A brief to help state and local agencies identify opportunities to align and leverage policies, programs, and funding across the three laws to support the education-to-workforce pipeline; a workbook to facilitate cross-agency conversations to identify and plan for alignment opportunities across ESSA, Perkins V, IDEA and WIOA; and an interactive tool that identifies specific language in the laws that address college and readiness topics and help state education agencies and local education agencies find new or greater alignment opportunities in their plans.

Authored by: College & Career Readiness & Success Center
Topics: Asset building, Education, Legislation & Policy, Post-secondary, Workforce development, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 2, 2019

Developing a College- and Career-Ready Workforce: An Analysis of ESSA, Perkins V, IDEA, and WIOA

Policy Brief
Mar 1, 2019
College & Career Readiness & Success Center
A brief to help state and local agencies identify opportunities to align and leverage policies, programs, and funding across the three laws to support the education-to-workforce pipeline; a workbook to facilitate cross-agency conversations to identify and plan for alignment opportunities across ESSA
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Interactive
Community:
Resources from Ascend at The Aspen Institute

Authored by: Ascend: The Aspen Institute
Topics: Asset building, Child welfare, Dual-generation, Early childhood, Family engagement, Research, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 2, 2019
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Research
Community:
Mar 28, 2019
Federal safety net programs are intended to protect the most vulnerable Americans—such as the elderly, people with severe disabilities and young children. Housing assistance plays a critical role in the safety net, providing decent, safe, and affordable housing for millions of extremely low-income and vulnerable families—though, because it is not an entitlement like other federal safety net programs, the assistance available falls far short of the need. Housing subsidies free families to spend on other essentials like healthy food, education, and health care.

Authored by: Susan J. Popkin for Journal of Housing & Community Development
Topics: Asset building, Dual-generation, Education, Housing, Mental health, Mobility, Partnerships, Research, Workforce development
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 2, 2019
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Publication
Community:
Mar 27, 2019
Housing is at the epicenter of all opportunities and outcomes. It is the first rung on the ladder to economic opportunity, and a person’s access to opportunity is linked with that of their community. From health, to economic mobility, to educational opportunity, to racial equity, and beyond, housing shapes families and communities.

Authored by: Maya Brennan and Veronica Gaitan for How Housing Matters, The Urban Institute
Topics: Asset building, Education, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Mobility, Racial inequalities
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 28, 2019

To Improve Lives and Expand Opportunities, Recognize the Power of Housing

Publication
Mar 27, 2019
Maya Brennan and Veronica Gaitan for How Housing Matters, The Urban Institute
Housing is at the epicenter of all opportunities and outcomes. It is the first rung on the ladder to economic opportunity, and a person’s access to opportunity is linked with that of their community.
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Podcast
Community:
Asset-based community development (ABCD) is a large and growing movement that considers local assets as the primary building blocks of community development, social capital, and health and well-being. Ron Dwyer-Voss, MA, the Owner of Pacific Community Solutions, who also happens to be a long-time friend of podcast host Peter Eckart, joined the show to discuss how ABCD draws on existing strengths of local residents, associations, and institutions to build stronger, healthier, and more sustainable communities. He shared strategies, tools, and examples of how ABCD can be used to engage community residents and support them in understanding and applying their power to improve their neighborhoods.

Authored by: All In: Data for Community Health
Topics: Asset building, Community development, Health, Partnerships
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 19, 2019
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Research
Community:
Jan 31, 2019
Because mental health conditions can negatively affect employment, people with these conditions make up a large share of federal disability program participants. Federal agencies have tested supported employment (SE) interventions designed to help those with mental health conditions keep or obtain employment and reduce their dependence on public programs. This brief describes the characteristics of adults with mental health conditions who participate in the federal disability programs and reports evidence from three recent studies of longer-term impacts of SE on the employment of people with mental health conditions. The findings indicate that, although a large share of disability program participants with mental health conditions report that they want to work, many face barriers, including being discouraged by failed past work attempts.

Authored by: Mathematica Policy Research
Topics: Asset building, Disabilities, Mental health, Research, Workforce development
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 18, 2019
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Research
Community:
Jan 25, 2019
The employment social enterprise (ESE) model can provide an opportunity to create a financially viable business that helps individuals with employment barriers become integrated into the labor force. This research studied eight ESEs. Findings suggest that by applying private‐sector business principles to a workforce development programs, social enterprises can provide participants with meaningful and valuable work experience, while offsetting program costs. Analysis identified four promising practices that social entrepreneurs should adopt when setting up a new enterprise. Enterprises should (a) provide soft‐skill training and social services to participants; (b) operate at a size that allows for economies of scale in production and the provision of support services; (c) have few occupational skill requirements; and (d) hire supervisors with both industry knowledge and the capacity to support individuals with employment barriers.

Authored by: Mathematica Policy Research
Topics: Asset building, Low-income, Research, Workforce development
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 18, 2019

Doing Good While Doing Business Using Financial Viability to Enhance Employability for the Disadvantaged

Research
Jan 25, 2019
Mathematica Policy Research
The employment social enterprise (ESE) model can provide an opportunity to create a financially viable business that helps individuals with employment barriers become integrated into the labor force. This research studied eight ESEs.
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News Article
Community:
Mar 15, 2019
The venture is a small yet innovative player in a growing number of nonprofits developing new models for work force training. Their overarching goal is upward mobility for low-income Americans and the two-thirds of workers without four-year college degrees.

Authored by: Steve Lohr for The New York Times
Topics: Asset building, Broadband, Low-income, Workforce development
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 15, 2019

Income Before: $18,000. After: $85,000. Does Tiny Nonprofit Hold a Key to the Middle Class?

News Article
Mar 15, 2019
Steve Lohr for The New York Times
The venture is a small yet innovative player in a growing number of nonprofits developing new models for work force training. Their overarching goal is upward mobility for low-income Americans and the two-thirds of workers without four-year college degrees.
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News Article
Community:
Feb 5, 2019
We beef up law enforcement to attack crime, devote more funding to try and improve inadequate schools and tackle health disparities by getting more people to the doctor. But what if Baltimore could solve all of its persistent social problems by getting rid of poverty?

Authored by: Baltimore Sun Editorial Board for The Baltimore Sun
Topics: Asset building, Criminal justice, Funding, Health, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Mental health
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 11, 2019

What if we just focused on poverty to solve the city's issues?

News Article
Feb 5, 2019
Baltimore Sun Editorial Board for The Baltimore Sun
We beef up law enforcement to attack crime, devote more funding to try and improve inadequate schools and tackle health disparities by getting more people to the doctor. But what if Baltimore could solve all of its persistent social problems by getting rid of poverty?
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Publication
Community:
Jan 25, 2019
As a result of decades of legalized discrimination in the housing industry, huge racial disparities in homeownership still exist today. This is not acceptable in a country founded on equal opportunity. Nationally, 72 percent of white households own a home, compared to only 42 percent of black households and 46 percent of Hispanic households. Homes typically make up the largest portion of a family’s overall wealth, so these disparities in homeownership are the most significant factor in the racial wealth gap.

Authored by: Kevin Campbell for Habitat for Humanity of Wake County
Topics: Asset building, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Racial inequalities
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 11, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Jan 22, 2019
In 2016, the health system teamed with Spartanburg Community College and the National Center for Construction Education and Research, a nonprofit that provides global training and certification. Together, the three entities began offering construction skills training to area residents.

Authored by: Alan Jenkins and Melinda Young for Discover Health
Topics: Asset building, Health, Low-income, Partnerships, Workforce development
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 11, 2019

Building a Community

News Article
Jan 22, 2019
Alan Jenkins and Melinda Young for Discover Health
In 2016, the health system teamed with Spartanburg Community College and the National Center for Construction Education and Research, a nonprofit that provides global training and certification. Together, the three entities began offering construction skills training to area residents.