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Housing Is Working Group 2023-2024 Calendar

Join the Housing Is Working Group to discuss special topics related to cross-sector initiatives and programmatic considerations particularly focused on the intersections of housing, health, and education.

This year’s public webinars cover topics such as the mobility asthma project, trauma-informed approaches to housing, resident-focused racial equity work, out-of-school time, and how FCC grantees are supprting voucher holders.

View Calendar
 

Elements of a Successful Partnership

With generous support from the MacArthur Foundation, CLPHA developed an in-depth report on regional housing-education collaborations taking place at housing authorities across the Pacific-Northwest.

Read the Multimedia Report
 
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Publication
Community:
May 25, 2017
Neighborhoods are constantly changing as residents come and go, businesses open and close, and properties go up or come down. No place is the same for long. When community changes are widespread or stark, the conversation shifts from change to “gentrification,” the definition of which is often subject to debate. At its heart, gentrification happens when a low-income area that has experienced disinvestment attracts new economic investments and higher-income residents. But the benefits of these changes can be overshadowed by the perpetuation of disadvantage.

Authored by: How Housing Matters for The Urban Institute
Topics: Community development, Housing, Low-income, Mobility, Racial inequalities
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 27, 2018
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News Article
Community:
Sep 22, 2018
For the Omaha refugee families removed from an apartment complex where city inspectors found gas leaks, vermin and other code violations, there were glimmers of progress Friday amid the uncertainty.

Authored by: Erin Duffy for the Omaha World Herald
Topics: Health, Housing, Immigrants, Low-income, Midwest, Safety
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 27, 2018

500 refugees evacuated from Omaha apartments could be in new housing or hotel rooms next week

News Article
Sep 22, 2018
Erin Duffy for the Omaha World Herald
For the Omaha refugee families removed from an apartment complex where city inspectors found gas leaks, vermin and other code violations, there were glimmers of progress Friday amid the uncertainty.
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News Article
Community:
Sep 25, 2018
In 17 years, the Family Independence Initiative has enrolled 3,000 families — four people per household on average — and is operating in 14 different cities across the country. Now the initiative is making a move into 10 neighborhoods across Chicago. With a $2.6 million backing from Google.org and the City of Chicago, the organization hopes to combat poverty and improve the quality of life for 1,000 families on the South and West sides by giving money directly to them while also strengthening their social ties.

Authored by: Manny Ramos for The Chicago Sun Times
Topics: Asset building, Low-income, Midwest, Workforce development
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 27, 2018

New initiative seeks to help people help themselves to escape poverty in Chicago

News Article
Sep 25, 2018
Manny Ramos for The Chicago Sun Times
In 17 years, the Family Independence Initiative has enrolled 3,000 families — four people per household on average — and is operating in 14 different cities across the country. Now the initiative is making a move into 10 neighborhoods across Chicago.
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News Article
Community:
Jan 18, 2018
An estimated half of all college students struggle with food insecurity, even at elite flagship universities like the University of California, Berkeley, and selective private schools like Northwestern University. Former foster youth, L.G.B.T. students and students of color are at substantially increased risk. Food insecurity is strongly linked to lower graduation rates.

Authored by: Sara Goldrick-Rab
Topics: Low-income, Post-secondary, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 26, 2018
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News Article
Community:
Sep 21, 2018
A children’s hospital in Columbus, Ohio, is trying to treat a difficult patient: Its own struggling neighborhood.

Authored by: Laura Bliss for CityLab
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Child welfare, Health, Housing, Low-income, Midwest, Partnerships
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 25, 2018
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Research
Community:
Sep 19, 2018
About 20 percent of adults in sheltered homeless families have a disability, compared with 9 percent of all US adults, yet few studies have addressed the intersection of disability and housing instability. A recent study explored the relationship between disabilities and Supplemental Security Income (SSI)/Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) income that homeless families reported when they entered emergency shelters, as well as later outcomes, such as housing stability, self-sufficiency, and food insecurity. It also examined how housing interventions affect SSI/SSDI income receipt.

Authored by: Urban Institute
Topics: Disabilities, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Research, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 20, 2018
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Research
Community:
Sep 19, 2018
Many social issues stem from a history of unstable, unaffordable, and poor-quality housing. Research shows that housing is the first rung on the ladder to economic opportunity for individuals and that a person’s access to opportunity is intrinsically linked with that of the community at large. As the gap between rents and incomes widens, it is critical that professionals in fields outside housing—including health, education, and economic development, among others—understand its central importance.

Authored by: Veronica Gaitan for Urban Institute
Topics: Community development, Education, Health, Housing, Low-income, Metrics, Partnerships, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 20, 2018

How Housing Can Determine Educational, Health, and Economic Outcomes

Research
Sep 19, 2018
Veronica Gaitan for Urban Institute
Many social issues stem from a history of unstable, unaffordable, and poor-quality housing. Research shows that housing is the first rung on the ladder to economic opportunity for individuals and that a person’s access to opportunity is intrinsically linked with that of the community at large.
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Interactive
Community:
Sep 18, 2018
HOW IT WORKS Ivory Innovations, a new initiative of the Sorenson Impact Center at the University of Utah, is working with an advisory board and partners that represent many of our nation’s top leaders in housing to find nominees for this new award. The emphasis for the prize will be on projects that provide a pathway to homeownership; however, those that address reducing rents will also be considered. WHO IS ELIGIBLE? Private-sector organizations, non-profit organizations, and public-private partnerships. Organizations or individuals are eligible.

Authored by:
Topics: Funding, Housing, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 18, 2018

Ivory Prize One Pager

Funding opportunity 

Interactive
Sep 18, 2018
HOW IT WORKS Ivory Innovations, a new initiative of the Sorenson Impact Center at the University of Utah, is working with an advisory board and partners that represent many of our nation’s top leaders in housing to find nominees for this new award.
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Interactive
Community:
Sep 18, 2018
The Ivory Prize for Housing Affordability seeks to tap the best and brightest ideas to focus on the complex challenge of housing affordability. The Prize will be designed to advance projects and reward innovators for their efforts to impact adoptable solutions to tackle housing affordability.

Authored by:
Topics: Funding, Housing, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 18, 2018
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News Article
Community:
Sep 11, 2018
Harvey — and its record rains — is long gone. But life may never be the same for thousands of children who spent the past school year — and will spend the one that just began — without a home. Their schools have been rebuilt. Their lives have not.

Authored by: Kristine Phillips for The Washington Post
Topics: Child welfare, Education, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 18, 2018

‘A light waiting ahead’: Students displaced by Hurricane Harvey return to their schools, if not their homes

News Article
Sep 11, 2018
Kristine Phillips for The Washington Post
Harvey — and its record rains — is long gone. But life may never be the same for thousands of children who spent the past school year — and will spend the one that just began — without a home. Their schools have been rebuilt. Their lives have not.
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News Article
Community:
Sep 12, 2018
As the devastating effects of the opioid crisis continue, a growing body of research supports the efficacy and safety of this sort of medication-assisted treatment (also called MAT) for drug recovery, when combined with psychotherapy. But the use of any of these medicines — a list that includes methadone and naltrexone, as well as Suboxone — remains frowned upon by most operators of sober living houses.

Authored by: Nina Feldman for NPR
Topics: Health, Housing, Substance abuse
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 18, 2018
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News Article
Community:
Sep 11, 2018
San Francisco health officials working to end HIV infections and deaths in The City are zeroing in on the homeless population, where there’s been an uptick in new cases.

Authored by: Joshua Sabatini for
Topics: Health, Homelessness, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Preventative care, West Coast
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 18, 2018
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Report
Community:
Jan 1, 2015
Trauma-Informed Care (TIC) is a holistic approach to providing services, distinct from a clinical treatment model. It has its roots in the Vietnam era, and evolved through the turn of the century, with a particular focus on female survivors of physical and sexual violence.

Authored by: McSilver Institute for Poverty Policy and Research
Topics: Health, Mental health, Partnerships, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 18, 2018

Harnessing the Learning Community Model to Integrate Trauma-Informed Care Principles in Service Organizations

Report
Jan 1, 2015
McSilver Institute for Poverty Policy and Research
Trauma-Informed Care (TIC) is a holistic approach to providing services, distinct from a clinical treatment model. It has its roots in the Vietnam era, and evolved through the turn of the century, with a particular focus on female survivors of physical and sexual violence.
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Research
Community:
Jul 1, 2018
This report compares the profile of the schools accessible to HUD-assisted and LIHTC households in 2016 to the profile of those accessible to other similar households within the same state or metropolitan area. In brief, we find that families receiving all four major types of federal housing assistance lived near lower performing and higher poverty schools than other poor families with children as well as other renters with children.

Authored by: Poverty and Race Research Action Council, NYU Furman Center, and UMass Boston
Topics: Education, Housing, Low-income, Mobility, Racial inequalities, Research, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 18, 2018

Housing and Educational Opportunity: Characteristics of Local Schools Near Families with Federal Housing Assistance

Research
Jul 1, 2018
Poverty and Race Research Action Council, NYU Furman Center, and UMass Boston
This report compares the profile of the schools accessible to HUD-assisted and LIHTC households in 2016 to the profile of those accessible to other similar households within the same state or metropolitan area.
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Research
Community:
Sep 17, 2018
The study finds three out of five adults across the U.S. had at least one adverse experience in their childhood, such as divorce, a parent's death, physical or emotional abuse, or a family member's incarceration or substance abuse problem. A quarter of adults have at least three such experiences in childhood, which – according to other research — increases their risk for most common chronic diseases, from heart disease and cancer to depression and substance abuse.

Authored by: Tara Haelle for NPR
Topics: Child welfare, Depression, Early childhood, Low-income, Mental health, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 18, 2018
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Case study
Community:
Jun 25, 2018
The King County Housing Authority (KCHA), in partnership with the Highline School District and the nonprofit social service organization Neighborhood House, launched the Student and Family Stability Initiative (SFSI) pilot program in 2013 to provide housing and employment supports to homeless and unstably housed families with children enrolled in Highline elementary schools. In 2016, KCHA contracted with the Urban Institute (Urban) to conduct a process and outcome evaluation of the program’s first three pilot years. This evaluation documents how SFSI works, who it serves, and how well it helps participants achieve housing stability. This report synthesizes findings from data collection conducted over approximately 10 months that included document review, interviews with SFSI stakeholders, and analysis of program and other relevant KCHA administrative data.

Authored by: Martha M. Galvez, Amanda Gold, and Sara McTarnaghan
Topics: Attendance, Dual-generation, Education, Family engagement, Housing, Low-income, Pacific Northwest, Partnerships, Place-based, Research, Stability, Workforce development, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 18, 2018

Evaluation of the Student and Family Stability Initiative

Case study
Jun 25, 2018
Martha M. Galvez, Amanda Gold, and Sara McTarnaghan
The King County Housing Authority (KCHA), in partnership with the Highline School District and the nonprofit social service organization Neighborhood House, launched the Student and Family Stability Initiative (SFSI) pilot program in 2013 to provide housing and employment supports to homeless and un
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Interactive
Community:
Sep 18, 2018
Understanding the characteristics of infants and toddlers in our states and communities is an important first step for supporting children’s development during their most critical years. Making more detailed and comprehensive information available on the young children living in different communities can help stakeholders more strategically develop and target key services such as child care, home visiting, or other services for young children. For example, knowing how many young children live in low-income families and what share have parents working full time can help states and localities tailor child care investments and services to reach those families who most need assistance.

Authored by: Cara Lou and Gina Adams for Urban Institute
Topics: Early childhood, East Coast, Health, Legislation & Policy, Midwest, South, West Coast
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 18, 2018
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Report
Community:
Aug 13, 2018
Maternal depression is a widespread public health concern that has been linked to negative impacts on child development and health outcomes. Within home visiting programs serving low-income women, maternal depression rates have been measured as high as 61 percent. Home visitors are uniquely positioned to help address maternal depression and can play an important role in conducting screenings and providing referrals to community resources. This brief summarizes the existing research to illustrate the importance of addressing maternal depression in home visiting programs, and outlines three promising approaches.

Authored by: Rebecca Peters and Devon Genua for Urban Institute
Topics: Early childhood, Health, Homelessness, Low-income, Mental health
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 18, 2018

Addressing Maternal Depression in the Context of Home Visiting: Opportunities and Challenges

Report
Aug 13, 2018
Rebecca Peters and Devon Genua for Urban Institute
Maternal depression is a widespread public health concern that has been linked to negative impacts on child development and health outcomes. Within home visiting programs serving low-income women, maternal depression rates have been measured as high as 61 percent.
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Podcast
Community:
Aug 15, 2018
Evidence shows that investing in children today can decrease poverty for the next generation of adults. Host Justin Milner speaks with researchers Heather Hahn and Cary Lou about the federal government’s current spending on kids, future projections for this spending, and what that means for America’s children.

Authored by: Urban Institute
Topics: Child welfare, Early childhood, Education, Funding, Legislation & Policy, Research, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 18, 2018
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Podcast
Community:
Sep 17, 2018
About MDRC’s “Evidence First” Podcast Series: Policymakers talk about solutions, but which ones really work? Join Katie Beal, MDRC’s External Affairs Associate, as she talks with experts about the best evidence available on education and social programs that serve low-income people.

Authored by: Katie Beal with MDRC
Topics: Education, Funding, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Post-secondary, Workforce development, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 17, 2018

Career and Technical Education: Past, Present, and Future

Podcast
Sep 17, 2018
Katie Beal with MDRC
About MDRC’s “Evidence First” Podcast Series: Policymakers talk about solutions, but which ones really work? Join Katie Beal, MDRC’s External Affairs Associate, as she talks with experts about the best evidence available on education and social programs that serve low-income people.
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News Article
Community:
Aug 19, 2018
A body of evidence points to a link between living in areas of concentrated poverty and health.

Authored by: Paul Chisholm for NPR
Topics: Child welfare, Community development, Health, Housing, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Metrics, Partnerships, Racial inequalities, Safety
Shared by Housing Is on Aug 20, 2018
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Report
Community:
May 1, 2018
Our initial report—which followed participants around the country over three years—found, among other things, that Year Up increased participants’ average quarterly earnings by more than 50 percent. These are the largest gains in earnings measured to date in random assignment studies of workforce training programs for youth and adults.

Authored by: David Fein and Jill Hamadyk for Abt Associates
Topics: Asset building, Education, Low-income, Mobility, Post-secondary, Research, Workforce development, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Aug 16, 2018

Bridging the Opportunity Divide for Low-Income Youth: Implementation and Early Impacts of the Year Up Program

Report
May 1, 2018
David Fein and Jill Hamadyk for Abt Associates
Our initial report—which followed participants around the country over three years—found, among other things, that Year Up increased participants’ average quarterly earnings by more than 50 percent.
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Policy Brief
Community:
Aug 9, 2018
Partnerships between medicaid and supportive housing providers

Authored by:
Topics: Cost effectiveness, Funding, Health, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Partnerships, Supportive housing
Shared by Housing Is on Aug 9, 2018
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Publication
Community:
Aug 9, 2018
Systems for Action (S4A) is a national program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) that aims to discover and apply new evidence about ways of aligning the delivery and financing systems for medical, social, and public health services that support a Culture of Health. This program, as well as RWJF’s other three signature research programs, Evidence for Action, Policies for Action, and Health Data for Action (launching April 19, 2017), are investigating the impact of different types of programs, policies, and health-related systems on health, equity and well-being.

Authored by:
Topics: Funding, Health, Housing, Partnerships, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Aug 9, 2018

Systems for Action: Systems and Services Research to Build a Culture of Health

Publication
Aug 9, 2018
Systems for Action (S4A) is a national program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) that aims to discover and apply new evidence about ways of aligning the delivery and financing systems for medical, social, and public health services that support a Culture of Health.
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Report
Community:
Aug 9, 2018
In the fall of 2011, a request for the submission of best practices was sent to public housing agencies (PHAs) and VA Medical Centers (VAMCs) that administer the program via the HUDVASH listserv. Over 50 best practices accounts were submitted in response to the request. The practices below have been compiled based on these accounts, which were cross-referenced with monthly data on agency performance and further developed through phone interviews.

Authored by:
Topics: Health, Housing, Partnerships
Shared by Housing Is on Aug 9, 2018