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Housing Is Working Group 2023-2024 Calendar

Join the Housing Is Working Group to discuss special topics related to cross-sector initiatives and programmatic considerations particularly focused on the intersections of housing, health, and education.

This year’s public webinars cover topics such as the mobility asthma project, trauma-informed approaches to housing, resident-focused racial equity work, out-of-school time, and how FCC grantees are supprting voucher holders.

View Calendar
 

Elements of a Successful Partnership

With generous support from the MacArthur Foundation, CLPHA developed an in-depth report on regional housing-education collaborations taking place at housing authorities across the Pacific-Northwest.

Read the Multimedia Report
 
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Policy Brief
Community:
Dec 3, 2018
Some seniors and people with disabilities receiving home- and community-based services (HCBS) could lose their Medicaid eligibility and have to go into nursing homes to get needed care if Congress adjourns without extending “spousal impoverishment” protections that are set to expire on December 31.

Authored by: Judith Solomon for The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Disabilities, Legislation & Policy, Medicaid / Medicare, Seniors
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 3, 2018

Protections for Married Couples Receiving Medicaid Home- and Community-Based Services End on December 31 Without Congressional Action

Policy Brief
Dec 3, 2018
Judith Solomon for The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
Some seniors and people with disabilities receiving home- and community-based services (HCBS) could lose their Medicaid eligibility and have to go into nursing homes to get needed care if Congress adjourns without extending “spousal impoverishment” protections that are set to expire on December 31.
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Interactive
Community:
Nov 29, 2018
With political divisions on the rise and global cooperation imperiled, city officials worldwide are stepping up to lead, solving local problems while sharing solutions and innovations across borders. Making cities such as New York, Pittsburgh, and Los Angeles inclusive, safe, and sustainable is vital to the future of the United States—and the globe. Driven by the need to act locally while thinking globally, a growing number of metro areas are adapting the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) as a blueprint for progress.

Authored by: The Brookings Institution
Topics: Community development, Housing, Partnerships, Place-based, Sustainability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 3, 2018
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Research
Community:
Oct 26, 2018
Some 15% of U.S. households with school-age children do not have a high-speed internet connection at home, according to a new Pew Research Center analysis of 2015 U.S. Census Bureau data. New survey findings from the Center also show that some teens are more likely to face digital hurdles when trying to complete their homework.

Authored by: Monica Anderson and Andrew Perrin for Pew Research Center
Topics: Broadband, Education, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 3, 2018
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Report
Community:
Sep 12, 2017
Broadband, especially wireline broadband in American homes, is the essential infrastructure for unlocking the internet’s economic benefits. However, broadband infrastructure is far from ubiquitous, both in terms of where it operates and who subscribes to it, and those deficits are not shared evenly across the country. As such, policymakers must understand how the national digital divide varies depending on the place.

Authored by: Adie Tomer, Elizabeth Kneebone, and Ranjitha Shivaram for The Brookings Institution
Topics: Broadband, Education, Low-income, Mobility, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 3, 2018
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News Article
Community:
Nov 30, 2018
The city and county of Durham, GoTriangle and the Durham Housing Authority are committed to enhancing opportunities for existing low-income families as well as to increasing the production of affordable housing. The light-rail project is critical to the success of these goals, and the success of these goals is critical to the light-rail project.

Authored by: Anthony Scott and John Tallmadge for The Herald Sun
Topics: Community development, Funding, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Partnerships, South, Stability, Transportation
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 3, 2018
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News Article
Community:
Nov 30, 2018
Despite their fearsome reputation, a new study finds most low-income housing projects aren't magnets for crime. What makes some more dangerous?

Authored by: Michael Friedrich for CityLab
Topics: Housing, Low-income, Research, Safety
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 30, 2018
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Publication
Community:
Nov 30, 2018
The uninsured rate among children rose in 2017 from 4.7 percent to 5 percent, a new report from Georgetown University’s Center for Children and Families finds — the first increase since Georgetown began producing this annual report a decade ago.

Authored by: Jesse Cross-Call for Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Child welfare, Health, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 30, 2018

Children's Uninsured Rate Rises for First Time in a Decade

Publication
Nov 30, 2018
Jesse Cross-Call for Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
The uninsured rate among children rose in 2017 from 4.7 percent to 5 percent, a new report from Georgetown University’s Center for Children and Families finds — the first increase since Georgetown began producing this annual report a decade ago.
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Policy Brief
Community:
Nov 29, 2018
The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) is giving state and local housing agencies more funds to help them carry out a promising new policy to enable families with Housing Choice Vouchers to move to higher-opportunity neighborhoods. Agencies must apply by December 31 to receive the funds.

Authored by: Will Fischer for The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
Topics: Child welfare, Funding, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Mobility
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 29, 2018

New Funds Will Help Housing Agencies Expand Opportunity for Families with Vouchers

Policy Brief
Nov 29, 2018
Will Fischer for The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) is giving state and local housing agencies more funds to help them carry out a promising new policy to enable families with Housing Choice Vouchers to move to higher-opportunity neighborhoods.
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News Article
Community:
Nov 28, 2018
Rock Region Metro has agreed to partner with a coalition of homeless organizations to address what people on the street say is their most vexing barrier to getting a job and, in turn, a home -- access to transportation.

Authored by: Noel Oman for Arkansas Democrat Gazette
Topics: Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, South, Transportation, Workforce development
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 29, 2018

Transit deal to assist homeless in central Arkansas; aim is free rides to work to help get people off streets

News Article
Nov 28, 2018
Noel Oman for Arkansas Democrat Gazette
Rock Region Metro has agreed to partner with a coalition of homeless organizations to address what people on the street say is their most vexing barrier to getting a job and, in turn, a home -- access to transportation.
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Research
Community:
Nov 28, 2018
Public housing residents are more likely than urban residents not living in public housing to have high rates of obesity and smoking and low rates of physical activity. This study assesses whether adding environmental interventions at public housing developments affects residents’ health-related habits and body mass index.

Authored by: BMC Public Health
Topics: Exercise, Health, Housing, Low-income, Obesity, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 29, 2018
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Publication
Community:
Nov 28, 2018
Housing instability among families and children can be detrimental to child welfare, health, economic, and other outcomes. Policymakers and service providers in these fields should consider weaving housing into their approaches. Treating instability at its roots can relieve the trade-offs and stress that emerge when no decent housing is affordable. Evidence indicates that affordable housing can improve a range of outcomes for families and—in combination with short-term or long-term services—help providers tackle complex challenges head-on.

Authored by: Aaron Shroyer for The Urban Institute
Topics: Child welfare, Family engagement, Housing, Low-income, Stability, Supportive housing
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 29, 2018
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Research
Community:
Nov 9, 2018
The Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) was first developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in 1990 to assess the health risk behaviors of youth and adults in the United States. For the first time since the survey has been widely administered, the 2017 YRBS optional question list included two questions pertaining to homelessness. Using this YRBS data from 17 states (Alaska, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Montana, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Wisconsin), we conducted an analysis of differences in seven self-reported risk factors and health outcomes between high school students experiencing homelessness and those not experiencing homelessness. The results were striking and heartbreaking.

Authored by: SchoolHouse Connection
Topics: Health, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Metrics, Research, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 29, 2018

Risk and Resilience: Differences in Risk Factors and Health Outcomes Between Homeless and Non-Homeless Students in 2017 YRBS Data

Research
Nov 9, 2018
SchoolHouse Connection
The Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) was first developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in 1990 to assess the health risk behaviors of youth and adults in the United States.
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Policy Brief
Community:
Mar 26, 2018
This two-page fact sheet summarizes existing data on young children who are homeless and their families, including the impact of homelessness on health, development, early learning, and well-being.

Authored by: SchoolHouse Connection
Topics: Child welfare, Early childhood, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 29, 2018
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Webinar
Community:
Oct 15, 2018
Each year, the National Summer Learning Association (NSLA) recognizes the outstanding work done during the summer months on behalf of our nation’s youth. NSLA held a Summer Learning Awards Kick-off Webinar to discuss the 2019 application and answer any questions you might have about the process. We were joined by Lauren Kellner Rudolph, Managing Program Director of Breakthrough Miami, and winner of a 2018 Excellence in Summer Learning Award.

Authored by: National Summer Learning Association
Topics: Education, Low-income, Out-of-school time, Place-based, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 29, 2018
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Research
Community:
Nov 27, 2018
Most states use an education funding formula to allocate state and local dollars to school districts. Most funding formulas attempt to account for student poverty, among other factors, in distributing funds. But there are several ways to count low-income students and even more ways to tie dollars to these student counts.

Authored by: Kristin Blagg for The Urban Institute
Topics: Child welfare, Education, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Place-based, Research, Stability, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 27, 2018
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Report
Community:
Mar 14, 2018
There were 33,889 homeless schoolchildren in Florida during the 2007–08 school year, including children temporarily doubled up with others and children staying in hotels, motels, shelters, transitional housing, and unsheltered locations. By the 2015–16 school year, that number had risen to 72,601. This report suggests that the rise is because of the recession and foreclosure crisis, the state’s increasing shortage of affordable housing, and school districts training teachers, counselors, and other staff to identify students with no permanent housing.

Authored by: The Shimberg Center for Housing Studies and Miami Homes for All
Topics: Data sharing, Education, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Research, South, Stability, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 21, 2018

How Does Homelessness Affect Educational Outcomes of Children in Florida?

Report
Mar 14, 2018
The Shimberg Center for Housing Studies and Miami Homes for All
There were 33,889 homeless schoolchildren in Florida during the 2007–08 school year, including children temporarily doubled up with others and children staying in hotels, motels, shelters, transitional housing, and unsheltered locations. By the 2015–16 school year, that number had risen to 72,601.
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Research
Community:
May 16, 2018
Treating opioid use disorder among homeless families can reduce hepatitis C transmission, infant drug withdrawal, and overdose, which is the leading cause of death among people experiencing homelessness. Although office-based treatment is effective for homeless patients, homelessness (especially among families) creates barriers to office-based opioid treatment, such as stigma, child care needs, or distance from an office site. To reduce barriers to treatment, the Family Team at the Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program added a shelter-based opioid treatment program to its outreach clinic at a family homeless shelter and motel. The Family Team consists of a physician, a nurse, two case managers, and a behavioral health clinician.

Authored by: American Public Health Association
Topics: Health, Homelessness, Housing, Place-based, Preventative care, Safety, Stability, Substance abuse
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 21, 2018
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Report
Community:
Oct 3, 2018
More than a third of homeless people are part of a family, most of which are headed by women with at least one child. Homeless families are different from single homeless people, and their needs differ. But limited research focuses on these families. This study aims to fill the gap by exploring longitudinal health service use and expenditures for homeless family members before and after entering an emergency shelter.

Authored by: Robin Clark, Linda Weinreb, Julie Flahive, and Robert Seifert for the American Journal of Public Health
Topics: Family engagement, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Preventative care, Research, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 21, 2018

Early Detection and Intervention Could Improve Health Outcomes for Homeless Families

Report
Oct 3, 2018
Robin Clark, Linda Weinreb, Julie Flahive, and Robert Seifert for the American Journal of Public Health
More than a third of homeless people are part of a family, most of which are headed by women with at least one child. Homeless families are different from single homeless people, and their needs differ. But limited research focuses on these families.
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Publication
Community:
Nov 20, 2018
People with mental health disabilities are vastly overrepresented in the population of people who experience homelessness. Of the more than 550,000 people in America who experienced homelessness on a given night in 2017, 1 in 5 had a mental illness. The proportion of people experiencing chronic homelessness with mental health disabilities was even higher—nearly 1 in 3. Despite this fact, the reality is that most people with mental illness fortunately do not experience homelessness: While about 20 percent of all adults in the United States have a mental illness, less than two-tenths of 1 percent of people in the country experienced homelessness on a given night in 2017.

Authored by: Heidi Schultheis for Center for American Progress
Topics: Depression, Disabilities, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Mental health, Partnerships, Preventative care, Stability, Substance abuse, Supportive housing
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 20, 2018

Lack of Housing and Mental Health Disabilities Exacerbate One Another

Publication
Nov 20, 2018
Heidi Schultheis for Center for American Progress
People with mental health disabilities are vastly overrepresented in the population of people who experience homelessness. Of the more than 550,000 people in America who experienced homelessness on a given night in 2017, 1 in 5 had a mental illness.
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Podcast
Community:
How should policymakers address the long-standing youth unemployment problem in Puerto Rico, which only worsened in the wake of Hurricanes Irma and Maria? After natural disasters, the government tends to focus its recovery efforts on infrastructure repairs and mental health services. But employment and economic security are equally important. With support from the W. T. Grant Foundation, MDRC partnered with Instituto del Desarrollo de la Juventud, or the Youth Development Institute, to develop recommendations that can create pathways into the workforce for young people and that are supported by evidence-based and promising practices relevant to the current situation in Puerto Rico. Join Katie Beal as she talks to John Martinez, Director of Program Development at MDRC, about the recommendations we made to facilitate and support training and employment opportunities for young people in Puerto Rico, and the challenges of implementing those recommendations.

Authored by: MDRC
Topics: Low-income, Research, Workforce development, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 19, 2018
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Report
Community:
May 1, 2018
The Enhanced Transitional Jobs Demonstration (ETJD), funded by the Employment and Training Administration of the U.S. Department of Labor, tested seven transitional jobs programs that targeted people recently released from prison or low-income parents who had fallen behind in child support payments.

Authored by: MDRC, OPRE, and Employment and Training Demonstration
Topics: Asset building, Cost effectiveness, Criminal justice, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Research, Stability, Workforce development, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 19, 2018
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Interactive
Community:
Resources for integrating resiliency, hope, and wellness in schools

Authored by: Treatment and Services Adaptation Center
Topics: Child welfare, Low-income, Partnerships, Place-based, Research, Safety
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 19, 2018
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Interactive
Community:
Nov 13, 2018
The California Homeless Youth Project and SchoolHouse Connection are proud to announce a series of five practical guides to support homeless and low-income college students in California. These series provide concise overviews of the five greatest needs of students experiencing homelessness.

Authored by: SchoolHouse Connection
Topics: Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Post-secondary, West Coast, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 19, 2018

5 Practical Guides to Support Homeless and Low-Income College Students in California

Interactive
Nov 13, 2018
SchoolHouse Connection
The California Homeless Youth Project and SchoolHouse Connection are proud to announce a series of five practical guides to support homeless and low-income college students in California. These series provide concise overviews of the five greatest needs of students experiencing homelessness.
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Research
Community:
Nov 19, 2018
For decades, free and reduced-price lunch (FRPL) status has been used as a proxy measure for student poverty. Families filled out paper lunch forms, and these were the basis for allocating resources to schools, defining accountability goals, and conducting research. But recent changes to the National School Lunch Program mean that FRPL status is in decline as a measure of student need, and states are turning to alternatives.

Authored by: Erica Greenberg for The Urban Institute
Topics: Child welfare, Education, Food insecurity, Health, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Metrics, Research, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 19, 2018

New measures of student poverty solve some challenges - and create others

Research
Nov 19, 2018
Erica Greenberg for The Urban Institute
For decades, free and reduced-price lunch (FRPL) status has been used as a proxy measure for student poverty. Families filled out paper lunch forms, and these were the basis for allocating resources to schools, defining accountability goals, and conducting research.
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Interactive
Community:
Nov 14, 2018
After decades of sprawl and suburban dominance, U.S. cities are experiencing rebounding populations, growing employment, and new public and private sector investments in places that are walkable, transit-oriented, and support diverse people and amenities. But we know that the benefits of these trends are not equally distributed, presenting an urgent opportunity for local and regional leaders to advance place-led development that produces better economic outcomes for more people in more places. To help deliver on that imperative, the Metropolitan Policy Program at Brookings launched the Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Center for Transformative Placemaking (“Bass Center”) with an event on Wednesday, November 14. In collaboration with Project for Public Spaces (PPS) and the National Main Street Center (NMSC), the Bass Center will inspire public, private, and civic sector leaders to make transformative place investments that generate widespread social and economic benefits. Brookings President John Allen, Bass Center Director and Senior Fellow Jennifer Vey, special guest speaker Carol Coletta, and a distinguished panel of experts discussed how market and demographic trends are driving new demands for placemaking that benefit more people and places.

Authored by: The Brookings Institution
Topics: Community development, Housing, Partnerships, Place-based, Safety, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 19, 2018

Transformative placemaking: Expanding opportunities for people and places

Interactive
Nov 14, 2018
The Brookings Institution
After decades of sprawl and suburban dominance, U.S. cities are experiencing rebounding populations, growing employment, and new public and private sector investments in places that are walkable, transit-oriented, and support diverse people and amenities.