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Welcome to Housing Is, a hub for generating effective programs and sharing innovative ideas.

 
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News Article
Community:
Oct 2, 2018
Students have around 60 programs at their disposal, from advanced manufacturing to emergency medical response.

Authored by: Heather Burian for CT
Topics: East Coast, Education, Food insecurity, Health, Low-income, Post-secondary, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Oct 4, 2018
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Research
Community:
Oct 3, 2018
Using administrative data from Massachusetts, this study analyzes the health care use and Medicaid expenditures of families who experienced one or more homeless episodes between 2008 and 2015 to investigate how health care use is related to emergency housing experiences.

Authored by: Urban Institute
Topics: Asthma, Child welfare, Depression, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Metrics, Pre-natal, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Oct 4, 2018

Early Detection and Intervention Could Improve Health Outcomes for Homeless Families

Research
Oct 3, 2018
Urban Institute
Using administrative data from Massachusetts, this study analyzes the health care use and Medicaid expenditures of families who experienced one or more homeless episodes between 2008 and 2015 to investigate how health care use is related to emergency housing experiences.
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Research
Community:
Oct 4, 2018
Housing providers and counselors in urban, suburban, and rural areas can help refugees and resettlement agencies navigate challenging rental markets, understand the evidence about how housing and neighborhoods matter, and prepare for long-term success as a renter or owner.

Authored by: Brianne Casey, Kimberly Burrowes, and Maya Brennan for Urban Institute
Topics: Community development, Housing, Immigrants, Research, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Oct 4, 2018

Secure Housing for Refugees Can Help Them—and US Communities—Prosper

Research
Oct 4, 2018
Brianne Casey, Kimberly Burrowes, and Maya Brennan for Urban Institute
Housing providers and counselors in urban, suburban, and rural areas can help refugees and resettlement agencies navigate challenging rental markets, understand the evidence about how housing and neighborhoods matter, and prepare for long-term success as a renter or owner.
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News Article
Community:
Sep 27, 2018
Nationally, resources for providing families with housing assistance are inadequate. DC is piloting a new approach, the DC Flexible Rent Subsidy Program (DC Flex), to test whether shallow (smaller than the average subsidy, over a defined period) and flexible subsidies can help more families maintain affordable, adequate housing.

Authored by: Mychal Cohen and Josh Leopold for Urban Institute
Topics: Cost effectiveness, East Coast, Housing, Low-income, Research, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Oct 4, 2018
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News Article
Community:
Oct 1, 2018
Some places lift children out of poverty. Others trap them there. Now cities are trying to do something about the difference.

Authored by: Emily Badger and Quoctrung Bui for The New York Times
Topics: Child welfare, CLPHA, Community development, Criminal justice, Housing, Low-income, Metrics, Mobility, Racial inequalities, Research, Stability, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Oct 1, 2018
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Community:

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Shared by Iyen Acosta on Sep 27, 2018
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Interactive
Community:
Apr 2, 2018
To help share some of the ground-breaking work happening around housing and education intersections in the Pacific Northwest, the Council of Large Public Housing Authorities’ Housing Is Initiative conducted 24 interviews with housing authorities and their partners like school district staff, principals, city council members, superintendents, and nonprofit organizations. This report uses text and video to illustrate the importance of cross-sector work, the elements of successful partnerships, and what can be achieved with regional collaboration.

Authored by: Abra Lyons-Warren for CLPHA
Topics: Pacific Northwest, Partnerships
Shared by Abra Lyons-Warren on Sep 27, 2018

Up and Down the I-5 Corridor: How Housing Authorities in the Pacific-Northwest Created a Regional Collaboration to Further Housing-Education Efforts

Interactive
Apr 2, 2018
Abra Lyons-Warren for CLPHA
To help share some of the ground-breaking work happening around housing and education intersections in the Pacific Northwest, the Council of Large Public Housing Authorities’ Housing Is Initiative conducted 24 interviews with housing authorities and their partners like school district staff, princip
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Publication
Community:
May 25, 2017
Neighborhoods are constantly changing as residents come and go, businesses open and close, and properties go up or come down. No place is the same for long. When community changes are widespread or stark, the conversation shifts from change to “gentrification,” the definition of which is often subject to debate. At its heart, gentrification happens when a low-income area that has experienced disinvestment attracts new economic investments and higher-income residents. But the benefits of these changes can be overshadowed by the perpetuation of disadvantage.

Authored by: How Housing Matters for The Urban Institute
Topics: Community development, Housing, Low-income, Mobility, Racial inequalities
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 27, 2018
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News Article
Community:
Sep 22, 2018
For the Omaha refugee families removed from an apartment complex where city inspectors found gas leaks, vermin and other code violations, there were glimmers of progress Friday amid the uncertainty.

Authored by: Erin Duffy for the Omaha World Herald
Topics: Health, Housing, Immigrants, Low-income, Midwest, Safety
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 27, 2018

500 refugees evacuated from Omaha apartments could be in new housing or hotel rooms next week

News Article
Sep 22, 2018
Erin Duffy for the Omaha World Herald
For the Omaha refugee families removed from an apartment complex where city inspectors found gas leaks, vermin and other code violations, there were glimmers of progress Friday amid the uncertainty.
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News Article
Community:
Sep 25, 2018
In 17 years, the Family Independence Initiative has enrolled 3,000 families — four people per household on average — and is operating in 14 different cities across the country. Now the initiative is making a move into 10 neighborhoods across Chicago. With a $2.6 million backing from Google.org and the City of Chicago, the organization hopes to combat poverty and improve the quality of life for 1,000 families on the South and West sides by giving money directly to them while also strengthening their social ties.

Authored by: Manny Ramos for The Chicago Sun Times
Topics: Asset building, Low-income, Midwest, Workforce development
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 27, 2018

New initiative seeks to help people help themselves to escape poverty in Chicago

News Article
Sep 25, 2018
Manny Ramos for The Chicago Sun Times
In 17 years, the Family Independence Initiative has enrolled 3,000 families — four people per household on average — and is operating in 14 different cities across the country. Now the initiative is making a move into 10 neighborhoods across Chicago.
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News Article
Community:
Jan 18, 2018
An estimated half of all college students struggle with food insecurity, even at elite flagship universities like the University of California, Berkeley, and selective private schools like Northwestern University. Former foster youth, L.G.B.T. students and students of color are at substantially increased risk. Food insecurity is strongly linked to lower graduation rates.

Authored by: Sara Goldrick-Rab
Topics: Low-income, Post-secondary, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 26, 2018
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News Article
Community:
Sep 21, 2018
A children’s hospital in Columbus, Ohio, is trying to treat a difficult patient: Its own struggling neighborhood.

Authored by: Laura Bliss for CityLab
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Child welfare, Health, Housing, Low-income, Midwest, Partnerships
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 25, 2018
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Research
Community:
Sep 19, 2018
About 20 percent of adults in sheltered homeless families have a disability, compared with 9 percent of all US adults, yet few studies have addressed the intersection of disability and housing instability. A recent study explored the relationship between disabilities and Supplemental Security Income (SSI)/Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) income that homeless families reported when they entered emergency shelters, as well as later outcomes, such as housing stability, self-sufficiency, and food insecurity. It also examined how housing interventions affect SSI/SSDI income receipt.

Authored by: Urban Institute
Topics: Disabilities, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Research, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 20, 2018
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Research
Community:
Sep 19, 2018
Many social issues stem from a history of unstable, unaffordable, and poor-quality housing. Research shows that housing is the first rung on the ladder to economic opportunity for individuals and that a person’s access to opportunity is intrinsically linked with that of the community at large. As the gap between rents and incomes widens, it is critical that professionals in fields outside housing—including health, education, and economic development, among others—understand its central importance.

Authored by: Veronica Gaitan for Urban Institute
Topics: Community development, Education, Health, Housing, Low-income, Metrics, Partnerships, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 20, 2018

How Housing Can Determine Educational, Health, and Economic Outcomes

Research
Sep 19, 2018
Veronica Gaitan for Urban Institute
Many social issues stem from a history of unstable, unaffordable, and poor-quality housing. Research shows that housing is the first rung on the ladder to economic opportunity for individuals and that a person’s access to opportunity is intrinsically linked with that of the community at large.
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Interactive
Community:
Sep 18, 2018
HOW IT WORKS Ivory Innovations, a new initiative of the Sorenson Impact Center at the University of Utah, is working with an advisory board and partners that represent many of our nation’s top leaders in housing to find nominees for this new award. The emphasis for the prize will be on projects that provide a pathway to homeownership; however, those that address reducing rents will also be considered. WHO IS ELIGIBLE? Private-sector organizations, non-profit organizations, and public-private partnerships. Organizations or individuals are eligible.

Authored by:
Topics: Funding, Housing, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 18, 2018

Ivory Prize One Pager

Funding opportunity 

Interactive
Sep 18, 2018
HOW IT WORKS Ivory Innovations, a new initiative of the Sorenson Impact Center at the University of Utah, is working with an advisory board and partners that represent many of our nation’s top leaders in housing to find nominees for this new award.
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Interactive
Community:
Sep 18, 2018
The Ivory Prize for Housing Affordability seeks to tap the best and brightest ideas to focus on the complex challenge of housing affordability. The Prize will be designed to advance projects and reward innovators for their efforts to impact adoptable solutions to tackle housing affordability.

Authored by:
Topics: Funding, Housing, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 18, 2018
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News Article
Community:
Sep 11, 2018
Harvey — and its record rains — is long gone. But life may never be the same for thousands of children who spent the past school year — and will spend the one that just began — without a home. Their schools have been rebuilt. Their lives have not.

Authored by: Kristine Phillips for The Washington Post
Topics: Child welfare, Education, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 18, 2018

‘A light waiting ahead’: Students displaced by Hurricane Harvey return to their schools, if not their homes

News Article
Sep 11, 2018
Kristine Phillips for The Washington Post
Harvey — and its record rains — is long gone. But life may never be the same for thousands of children who spent the past school year — and will spend the one that just began — without a home. Their schools have been rebuilt. Their lives have not.
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News Article
Community:
Sep 12, 2018
As the devastating effects of the opioid crisis continue, a growing body of research supports the efficacy and safety of this sort of medication-assisted treatment (also called MAT) for drug recovery, when combined with psychotherapy. But the use of any of these medicines — a list that includes methadone and naltrexone, as well as Suboxone — remains frowned upon by most operators of sober living houses.

Authored by: Nina Feldman for NPR
Topics: Health, Housing, Substance abuse
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 18, 2018
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News Article
Community:
Sep 11, 2018
San Francisco health officials working to end HIV infections and deaths in The City are zeroing in on the homeless population, where there’s been an uptick in new cases.

Authored by: Joshua Sabatini for
Topics: Health, Homelessness, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Preventative care, West Coast
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 18, 2018
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Report
Community:
Jan 1, 2015
Trauma-Informed Care (TIC) is a holistic approach to providing services, distinct from a clinical treatment model. It has its roots in the Vietnam era, and evolved through the turn of the century, with a particular focus on female survivors of physical and sexual violence.

Authored by: McSilver Institute for Poverty Policy and Research
Topics: Health, Mental health, Partnerships, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 18, 2018

Harnessing the Learning Community Model to Integrate Trauma-Informed Care Principles in Service Organizations

Report
Jan 1, 2015
McSilver Institute for Poverty Policy and Research
Trauma-Informed Care (TIC) is a holistic approach to providing services, distinct from a clinical treatment model. It has its roots in the Vietnam era, and evolved through the turn of the century, with a particular focus on female survivors of physical and sexual violence.
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Research
Community:
Jul 1, 2018
This report compares the profile of the schools accessible to HUD-assisted and LIHTC households in 2016 to the profile of those accessible to other similar households within the same state or metropolitan area. In brief, we find that families receiving all four major types of federal housing assistance lived near lower performing and higher poverty schools than other poor families with children as well as other renters with children.

Authored by: Poverty and Race Research Action Council, NYU Furman Center, and UMass Boston
Topics: Education, Housing, Low-income, Mobility, Racial inequalities, Research, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 18, 2018

Housing and Educational Opportunity: Characteristics of Local Schools Near Families with Federal Housing Assistance

Research
Jul 1, 2018
Poverty and Race Research Action Council, NYU Furman Center, and UMass Boston
This report compares the profile of the schools accessible to HUD-assisted and LIHTC households in 2016 to the profile of those accessible to other similar households within the same state or metropolitan area.
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Research
Community:
Sep 17, 2018
The study finds three out of five adults across the U.S. had at least one adverse experience in their childhood, such as divorce, a parent's death, physical or emotional abuse, or a family member's incarceration or substance abuse problem. A quarter of adults have at least three such experiences in childhood, which – according to other research — increases their risk for most common chronic diseases, from heart disease and cancer to depression and substance abuse.

Authored by: Tara Haelle for NPR
Topics: Child welfare, Depression, Early childhood, Low-income, Mental health, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 18, 2018
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Case study
Community:
Jun 25, 2018
The King County Housing Authority (KCHA), in partnership with the Highline School District and the nonprofit social service organization Neighborhood House, launched the Student and Family Stability Initiative (SFSI) pilot program in 2013 to provide housing and employment supports to homeless and unstably housed families with children enrolled in Highline elementary schools. In 2016, KCHA contracted with the Urban Institute (Urban) to conduct a process and outcome evaluation of the program’s first three pilot years. This evaluation documents how SFSI works, who it serves, and how well it helps participants achieve housing stability. This report synthesizes findings from data collection conducted over approximately 10 months that included document review, interviews with SFSI stakeholders, and analysis of program and other relevant KCHA administrative data.

Authored by: Martha M. Galvez, Amanda Gold, and Sara McTarnaghan
Topics: Attendance, Dual-generation, Education, Family engagement, Housing, Low-income, Pacific Northwest, Partnerships, Place-based, Research, Stability, Workforce development, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 18, 2018

Evaluation of the Student and Family Stability Initiative

Case study
Jun 25, 2018
Martha M. Galvez, Amanda Gold, and Sara McTarnaghan
The King County Housing Authority (KCHA), in partnership with the Highline School District and the nonprofit social service organization Neighborhood House, launched the Student and Family Stability Initiative (SFSI) pilot program in 2013 to provide housing and employment supports to homeless and un
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Interactive
Community:
Sep 18, 2018
Understanding the characteristics of infants and toddlers in our states and communities is an important first step for supporting children’s development during their most critical years. Making more detailed and comprehensive information available on the young children living in different communities can help stakeholders more strategically develop and target key services such as child care, home visiting, or other services for young children. For example, knowing how many young children live in low-income families and what share have parents working full time can help states and localities tailor child care investments and services to reach those families who most need assistance.

Authored by: Cara Lou and Gina Adams for Urban Institute
Topics: Early childhood, East Coast, Health, Legislation & Policy, Midwest, South, West Coast
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 18, 2018
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Report
Community:
Aug 13, 2018
Maternal depression is a widespread public health concern that has been linked to negative impacts on child development and health outcomes. Within home visiting programs serving low-income women, maternal depression rates have been measured as high as 61 percent. Home visitors are uniquely positioned to help address maternal depression and can play an important role in conducting screenings and providing referrals to community resources. This brief summarizes the existing research to illustrate the importance of addressing maternal depression in home visiting programs, and outlines three promising approaches.

Authored by: Rebecca Peters and Devon Genua for Urban Institute
Topics: Early childhood, Health, Homelessness, Low-income, Mental health
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 18, 2018

Addressing Maternal Depression in the Context of Home Visiting: Opportunities and Challenges

Report
Aug 13, 2018
Rebecca Peters and Devon Genua for Urban Institute
Maternal depression is a widespread public health concern that has been linked to negative impacts on child development and health outcomes. Within home visiting programs serving low-income women, maternal depression rates have been measured as high as 61 percent.