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Elements of a Successful Partnership

With generous support from the MacArthur Foundation, CLPHA developed an in-depth report on regional housing-education collaborations taking place at housing authorities across the Pacific-Northwest.

Read the Multimedia Report
 

National Snapshot of PHA-Health Partnerships

The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) provides new data about public housing authorities’ partnerships with the health sector and offers recommendations to encourage collaboration between these affordable housing providers and their health system partners.

Read the Report
 
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Report
Community: Seniors
Dec 3, 2020
During the COVID-19 pandemic, service coordinators played a pivotal role in the support of older adult residents of publicly funded housing properties. Some independent housing operators employ service coordinators to increase residents’ self-sufficiency, physical security, social connections, and the delivery of long-term community-based supportive services. This report presents results from a survey conducted between June 23 and July 17, 2020 to explore the experiences of these service coordinators during the early months of COVID-19. At the time of the survey, about one-third of respondents were aware of at least one resident on the property who had tested positive for COVID-19. The survey revealed the pandemic’s impact on the lives of older residents of publicly funded housing. Professional support systems that typically provided personal assistance and medical care were interrupted, threatening residents’ physical and mental health. Transportation and resource acquisition systems were also unsettled, creating barriers to activities of independent living such as shopping to acquire food and medication. Social challenges were particularly acute during the early months of the pandemic. Residents demonstrated signs of anxiety and loneliness as their typical experiences of community life were muted. And, while health guidelines and novel benefit programs emerged at a steady clip, communication systems had to be modified from largely in-person formats to accommodate a population of older adults without consistent access to technological platforms.

Authored by: Samara Scheckler for THE JOINT CENTER FOR HOUSING STUDIES OF HARVARD UNIVERSITY
Topics: Community development, Housing, Mental health, Seniors
Shared by Housing Is on Dec 3, 2020

For Older Adults in Publicly Funded Housing During the Pandemic, Service Coordinators Help Build Resilience

Report
Dec 3, 2020
Samara Scheckler for THE JOINT CENTER FOR HOUSING STUDIES OF HARVARD UNIVERSITY
During the COVID-19 pandemic, service coordinators played a pivotal role in the support of older adult residents of publicly funded housing properties.
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Research
Community:
Aug 5, 2019
CLPHA developed a general data sharing template that public housing authorities (PHAs) and their health partners can customize to suit their data sharing and collaboration needs. Please feel free to comment to share any uses/modifications your organization made to implement into a partnership.

Authored by:
Topics: Affordable Care Act, CLPHA, Community development, Cost effectiveness, Data sharing, Dental, Depression, Dual-eligibles, Funding, Health, Healthy homes, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Mental health, Metrics, MTW, Nutrition, Obesity, Partnerships, Place-based, Preventative care, Racial inequalities, Research, SAMHSA, Smoke-free, Stability, Substance abuse, Supportive housing, Sustainability, TA
Shared by Steve Lucas on Aug 5, 2019

CLPHA Data Sharing Template for PHAs and Health Organizations

 

Disclaimer: This template is provided for informational purposes only and not for the purpose of providing legal advice. You should contact your attorney to obtain advice with respect to any particular issue or question. Use of this template, including its exhibits and attachments, does not create a relationship or any responsibilities between CLPHA and the user.

Research
Aug 5, 2019
CLPHA developed a general data sharing template that public housing authorities (PHAs) and their health partners can customize to suit their data sharing and collaboration needs. Please feel free to comment to share any uses/modifications your organization made to implement into a partnership.
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Research
Community:
Jul 21, 2018
A new study measured the mental health of Philadelphia residents before and after blighted lots had been converted into green spaces.

Authored by: Melissa Breyer for treehugger
Topics: Community development, Health, Mental health, Place-based, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 11, 2019
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Research
Community:
Feb 6, 2019
Research suggests that living in concentrated poverty is harmful to health, well-being, and economic mobility. Inclusionary zoning can break up poverty density by imposing legal requirements to create affordable housing across neighborhoods. In Montgomery County, Maryland, inclusionary zoning laws require developers to set aside 12 to 15 percent of new homes at below-market rates and allow the public housing authority to purchase a portion of these units. As a result, two-thirds of public housing residents in Montgomery County live in economically diverse, low-poverty neighborhoods. To assess the effects of these unique conditions, researchers explored how public housing residents’ social networks, neighborhood perceptions, and health outcomes differ based on their placement in mixed-income communities or traditionally clustered public housing.

Authored by: Heather Schwartz, Susan Burkhauser, Beth Ann Griffin, David Kennedy, Harold Green Jr., Alene Kennedy-Hendricks, and Craig Pollack for Housing Policy Debate, How Housing Matters
Topics: Community development, Housing, Mental health, Place-based, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Feb 7, 2019

Inclusionary Zoning Can Improve Outcomes for Public Housing Residents

Research
Feb 6, 2019
Heather Schwartz, Susan Burkhauser, Beth Ann Griffin, David Kennedy, Harold Green Jr., Alene Kennedy-Hendricks, and Craig Pollack for Housing Policy Debate, How Housing Matters
Research suggests that living in concentrated poverty is harmful to health, well-being, and economic mobility. Inclusionary zoning can break up poverty density by imposing legal requirements to create affordable housing across neighborhoods.
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News Article
Community:
Jan 10, 2019
Island School is one of 247 “community schools” in New York. These are regular public schools, with a twist. They have longer days and longer school years: Island stays open 12 hours a day, six days a week, including spring and winter breaks as well as the summer. A psychologist makes weekly rounds. A dentist comes by regularly. So does an optometrist, and students who need glasses get them free.

Authored by: David L. Kirk for The New York Times
Topics: Community development, Dual-generation, East Coast, Education, Family engagement, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Mental health, Metrics, Partnerships, Stability, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 10, 2019
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Research
Community:
Dec 5, 2018
How does the quality of where we live affect our children’s development? The impact of housing and neighborhood quality on physical health has long been studied in the public health field, but studies that aim to assess those same impacts on mental health are less common. This study examined the relationship between the physical quality of housing and neighborhoods and their interactive effect on the mental health and motivation of children from elementary school through young adulthood.

Authored by: Journal of Environmental Psychology
Topics: Child welfare, Community development, Housing, Low-income, Mental health, Racial inequalities, Research, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 6, 2018

How Housing and Neighborhood Quality Affect Children's Mental Health

Research
Dec 5, 2018
Journal of Environmental Psychology
How does the quality of where we live affect our children’s development? The impact of housing and neighborhood quality on physical health has long been studied in the public health field, but studies that aim to assess those same impacts on mental health are less common.
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Report
Community:
Oct 24, 2018
CLPHA’s Housing Is Initiative is engaged in a number of cross-sector activities focused on developing partnerships, facilitating a community of practice, resource development, promoting best practices, online collaboration, policy and advocacy, and training and education. Read about recent activities in this Fall Update.

Authored by:
Topics: Child welfare, CLPHA, Community development, Cost effectiveness, Data sharing, Early childhood, Education, Family engagement, Funding, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Mental health, Partnerships, Place-based, Post-secondary, Research, Stability, Substance abuse, Workforce development, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Oct 24, 2018
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Publication
Community:
Aug 9, 2018
Trauma is a set of normal human responses to stressful and threatening experiences (National Center for PTSD, 2007). Low-income and public housing residents may experience cumulative trauma resulting from daily stressors of violence and concentrated poverty, as well as historic and structural conditions of racism and disenfranchisement. We present a model of Trauma Informed Community Building (TICB) that addresses the challenges trauma poses to traditional community building strategies. TICB strategies de-escalate chaos and stress, build social cohesion and foster community resiliency over time.

Authored by:
Topics: Community development, Housing, Low-income, Mental health, Racial inequalities
Shared by Housing Is on Aug 9, 2018
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Research
Community:
Aug 1, 2018
We examined the impact of long-term (6 months or more) vacant housing and various durations of vacancy on a variety of health outcomes at the neighborhood level across three types of U.S. metropolitan areas (metros): (1) those that have experienced consistently strong growth, (2) those that have undergone weak growth, and (3) those hit hardest by the foreclosure crisis

Authored by:
Topics: Asset building, Asthma, Community development, Health, Housing, Low-income, Mental health, Metrics, Research, Safety, Transportation
Shared by Housing Is on Aug 1, 2018
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Policy Brief
Community:
Jul 17, 2018
The Denver Social Impact Bond program is an initiative aimed at measurably improving the lives of people most in need by driving resources towards better, more effective programs. Social Impact Bonds are a unique type of performance-based contract where private and/or philanthropic lenders loan funds to accomplish a specific objective and are repaid based on whether the program achieves its goals. Denver’s Social Impact Bond program will use funds from lenders to provide housing and supportive case management services to at least 250 homeless individuals who frequently use the city’s emergency services, including police, jail, the courts and emergency rooms.

Authored by:
Topics: Community development, Cost effectiveness, Criminal justice, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Mental health, Partnerships, Stability, Substance abuse, West Coast
Shared by Housing Is on Jul 17, 2018
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Case study
Community:
Jul 17, 2018
The South Lincoln Health Impact Assessment (HIA) focuses on the redevelopment master plan for the Denver Housing Authority’s South Lincoln Homes community in downtown Denver. The rapid HIA and masterplan was a four-month process that began in April 2009. The HIA identifies potential health impacts and recommends changes to optimize positive and minimize negative health consequences for the South Lincoln neighborhood. This assessment includes community demographic and socioeconomic information, identified potential health issues, interviews available surveys, and limited body measurement data along with supportive evidence-based research and recommendations that informed the HIA and masterplan design.

Authored by:
Topics: Child welfare, Community development, Disabilities, Dual-generation, Health, Housing, Low-income, Mental health, Metrics, Nutrition, Preventative care, Research, Safety
Shared by Housing Is on Jul 17, 2018
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Case study
Community:
Jul 12, 2018
The Trauma Informed Community Building (TICB) model is based on BRIDGE Housing Corporation’s experience doing community building work over the past five years in the Potrero Terrace and Annex public housing sites in San Francisco, CA.

Authored by:
Topics: Child welfare, Community development, Dual-generation, Family engagement, Low-income, Mental health, Partnerships, Place-based, Preventative care, Research, Safety
Shared by Housing Is on Jul 12, 2018

Best and Promising Practices: Trauma Informed Community Building - A model for Strengthening Communities in Trauma Affected Neighborhoods

Case study
Jul 12, 2018
The Trauma Informed Community Building (TICB) model is based on BRIDGE Housing Corporation’s experience doing community building work over the past five years in the Potrero Terrace and Annex public housing sites in San Francisco, CA.
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News Article
Community:
Jul 3, 2018
Researchers have shown — and teachers know — that schoolchildren exposed to neighborhood violence can have a tougher time learning, experiencing more stress and depression than their peers growing up in safe neighborhoods. But a Johns Hopkins University sociologist discovered that the consequences of neighborhood violence reach further than previously known, even spilling over to students who come from safe neighborhoods. Using crime and student data from Chicago, Julia Burdick-Will linked exposure to neighborhood violence to a drop in test scores, an effect that extended to students coming from communities that experienced little or no violence.

Authored by: Moriah Balingit for The Washington Post
Topics: Attendance, Child welfare, Community development, Depression, Education, Health, Low-income, Mental health, Midwest, Out-of-school time, Post-secondary, Racial inequalities, Research, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jul 3, 2018

What happens when schoolchildren live in violent neighborhoods? The effects are broader than previously known, a study finds.

News Article
Jul 3, 2018
Moriah Balingit for The Washington Post
Researchers have shown — and teachers know — that schoolchildren exposed to neighborhood violence can have a tougher time learning, experiencing more stress and depression than their peers growing up in safe neighborhoods.
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Video
Community:
May 23, 2018
The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) hosted The Housing Is Summit in Washington, D.C., on May 3-4, 2018 with 300 partners across the housing, education, and healthcare sectors. Access video recordings of the Summit's keynote speakers (HUD Secretary Ben Carson, John Bridgeland, Matthew Morton), plenary panels (on topics that cut across sectors like anchor institutions, data collaboration, stability, and foundation investments), and select breakout sessions focused on the intersections of housing, education, and health.

Authored by: Council of Large Public Housing Authorities
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Attendance, Child welfare, CLPHA, Community development, Data sharing, Dual-eligibles, Dual-generation, Early childhood, Education, Funding, Grade-level proficiency, Health, Healthy homes, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Mental health, Metrics, MTW, Out-of-school time, Partnerships, Place-based, Preventative care, Racial inequalities, Research, School-readiness, Seniors, Stability, Substance abuse, Supportive housing, Sustainability, TA, Workforce development, Youth
Shared by Steve Lucas on May 23, 2018

2018 CLPHA Housing Is Summit - Video Recordings

The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) hosted The Housing Is Summit in Washington, D.C., on May 3-4, 2018 with 200 partners across the housing, education, and healthcare sectors. The Summit highlighted the ways that we can transform systems to better serve low-income people with two days of plenary speakers/panels, breakout sessions, and caucus discussions geared toward intersectional thinking and ways to take action. 

Video
May 23, 2018
Council of Large Public Housing Authorities
The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) hosted The Housing Is Summit in Washington, D.C., on May 3-4, 2018 with 300 partners across the housing, education, and healthcare sectors.
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Webinar
Community:
Feb 21, 2018
Presentation from CLPHA's February 2018 Health Strategic Planning Workshop, co-facilitated with Health Impact Project and Grantmakers in Health

Authored by: CLPHA, Health Impact Project (Pew/RWJF), and Grantmakers in Health
Topics: Affordable Care Act, CLPHA, Community development, Data sharing, Health, Healthy homes, Homelessness, Housing, Medicaid / Medicare, Mental health, Obesity, Partnerships, Place-based, Research, Supportive housing, TA
Shared by Steve Lucas on Feb 27, 2018

CLPHA Health Strategic Planning Workshop Presentation

The 2018 CLPHA Health Strategic Planning Workshop, co-facilitated with Health Impact Project (a collaboration of Pew Charitable Trusts and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation) and Grantmakers in Health, convened over 35 communities across the country. Participating teams included internal PHA staff at member agencies who work on health-related initiatives as well as external partners that provide services, education, and other health resources for residents.

Webinar
Feb 21, 2018
CLPHA, Health Impact Project (Pew/RWJF), and Grantmakers in Health
Presentation from CLPHA's February 2018 Health Strategic Planning Workshop, co-facilitated with Health Impact Project and Grantmakers in Health