Resources

 

Welcome to Resources! Explore research, policy, news, and other resources related to housing, education, and health, as well as share your own content. Use the commenting feature to interact and collaborate with other users.

 
Found 77 resources.
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Publication Oct 3, 2019
A majority of property managers report that a smoke-free policy is largely well followed and self enforced by residents and staff. However, it is not uncommon for a small minority of residents to struggle or refuse to comply by continuing to smoke or allowing their guests to smoke on the property. These resources and tools can assist management in promoting compliance and enforcing the policy when necessary. If you would like to consult on solutions specific to your situation, reach out to info@smokefreepublichousingproject.org.

Authored by: Clean Air for All
Topics: Health, Healthy homes, Smoke-free
Shared by Jackie Siewert on Oct 3, 2019
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Publication May 30, 2019
A more regional approach to care is needed – one that involves coordinated, person-centered healthcare with robust connections to social services and community resources. An innovative infrastructure to do just that is underway in four communities across New Jersey: Trenton, Camden, Newark, and Paterson. Efforts begun in 2011 under New Jersey’s Medicaid Accountable Care Organization (ACO) Demonstration Project have evolved into four regional collaboratives that integrate, coordinate, and align all the disconnected programs aimed at making communities healthier.

Authored by: Kathleen Noonan and Jon Tew for Camden Coaliton of Healthcare Providers
Topics: Data sharing, East Coast, Health, Partnerships
Shared by Housing Is on Jun 13, 2019
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Publication Jun 12, 2019
Zoning rules dictate more than just how we can use and build on land. They also shape our communities and our lives. Land use laws determine where we can find housing, schools, and parks—and who has access to them.

Authored by: Maya Brennan, Emily Peiffer, and Kimberly Burrowes for How Housing Matters, The Urban Institute
Topics: Health, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Racial inequalities
Shared by Housing Is on Jun 13, 2019
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This paper analyzes why SNAP benefits are inadequate, reviews the body of research showing positive effects from more adequate SNAP benefits, and offers key policy solutions to improve benefit adequacy.

Authored by: Food Research & Action Center (FRAC)
Topics: Food insecurity, Health, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Nutrition, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Jun 11, 2019
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Publication May 20, 2019
African-Americans are three times more likely to die from asthma as whites. In Philadelphia and elsewhere, how can outcomes improve with changes to housing quality and pollution control?

Authored by: Sophia Newman for Next City
Topics: Asthma, Health, Housing, Low-income, Racial inequalities
Shared by Housing Is on May 23, 2019
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Publication May 22, 2019
In May 2018, Kaiser Permanente, the largest private integrated care system in the US, announced that it would invest $200 million through its Thriving Communities Fund to address the affordable housing crisis in California’s Bay Area. Then in 2019, Kaiser announced that it used the fund to purchase an apartment building in a diverse but quickly gentrifying neighborhood in Oakland with the express purpose of making repairs and upgrades to improve health in the building and to ensure affordability to current residents. If Kaiser wanted to improve health, why wouldn’t it focus solely on housing...

Authored by: Martha Fedorowicz for How Housing Matters, The Urban Institute
Topics: Health, Housing, Low-income
Shared by Housing Is on May 23, 2019
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Publication Apr 25, 2019
Research shows that clinical care is only one factor that impacts population health and that a collection of other factors – including the natural and built environment where people live, education economic stability, food, and community and social context – grouped under the term social determinants of health (SDOH), have significantly more influence on care utilization, outcomes, and population health. Together, these factors account for 60% of preventable mortality.

Authored by: Daniel Young for The Network for Public Health Law
Topics: Child welfare, Early childhood, Health, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare
Shared by Housing Is on May 2, 2019
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Publication May 1, 2019
Focusing on traditional neighborhood measures such as disadvantage and segregation rarely reveals how specific policies, powerful decisionmakers, and institutions built on racial hierarchy generate and maintain racial health disparities. To help researchers, policymakers, and practitioners consider how best to recognize and incorporate structural racism in the study of place-based health disparities, this literature review highlights four lessons researchers can use to more directly study the connection between structural racism and health.

Authored by: How Housing Matters for The Urban Institute
Topics: Health, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Housing Is on May 2, 2019
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Moving Health Care Upstream (MHCU) is based on the belief that health systems can address persistent and costly health inequities by moving “upstream”—beyond the walls of hospitals and clinics and into the communities, collaborating with community-based organizations to address the root causes of disease. The various areas of work within MHCU share a common focus-supporting hospitals and community stakeholders in testing and spreading strategies to move upstream, and sharing “what works” to inform the field and accelerate the upstream movement in the field as a whole. Policy Learning Labs are...

Authored by: Nemours, Moving Health Care Upstream, and Change Lab Solutions
Topics: Child welfare, Early childhood, Food insecurity, Green, Health, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Nutrition, Partnerships, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on May 1, 2019
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Publication Apr 24, 2019
Are you a Pennsylvanian without a high school diploma? Then sign up with AmeriHealth Caritas for Medicaid and the plan will help you get your GED. Having trouble getting a job in Ohio? If you are enrolled in CareSource, the Life Services JobConnect in CareSource’s managed care organization (MCO) will arrange job coaching and other employment services at no cost. These are not examples of corporate philanthropy. Rather, they reflect a growing recognition in the health care sector, especially among managed care organizations, that good health—and achieving lower medical costs—requires a focus...

Authored by: Stuart Butler for news@Jama
Topics: Education, Food insecurity, Health, Housing, Low-income, Nutrition, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 25, 2019
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Publication Apr 25, 2019
Adequate, safe, and affordable housing is one of our most basic needs. But in the US, access to housing is not guaranteed. Demand for affordable housing is growing, especially as housing costs increase beyond wage growth in many communities. Hospitals and health systems are stepping in to help fill this gap. Because of their mission orientation, the importance of stable housing on health outcomes, and policy changes initiated by the Affordable Care Act, hospitals and health systems are increasingly investing in and supporting the creation of affordable housing in their communities.

Authored by: Martha Fedorowicz and Kathryn Reynolds for How Housing Matters, The Urban Institute
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Community development, Health, Housing, Low-income
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 25, 2019
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Publication Apr 24, 2019
The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and states spend over $300 billion per year on the care of dually eligible individuals, yet still do not achieve acceptable health outcomes. In a 2016 study of social risk factors in the Medicare value-based purchasing programs, dual enrollment status was the most powerful predictor of poor outcomes. For example, relative to Medicare-only beneficiaries, dually eligible individuals had 10-31 percent higher risk-adjusted odds of hospital readmission across conditions measured in the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program, and scores were...

Authored by: Seema Verma for Health Affairs
Topics: Dual-eligibles, Funding, Health, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Research, Seniors
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 24, 2019
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Publication Apr 8, 2019
In 2015, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) prevented 8.4 million people from living in poverty. This essential and effective safety net program helps people with low incomes purchase food for themselves and their families—an estimated 40.8 million Americans were living in poverty in 2015; absent SNAP benefits, that number would have been 49.1 million. Despite its success, SNAP is facing rule changes that would cause people to lose benefits—harming those who need it most and weakening the poverty-fighting power of the program.

Authored by: Anthony Barrows for Ideas 42
Topics: Food insecurity, Health, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Nutrition
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 18, 2019
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The role of public and nonprofit hospitals and hospital systems in supportive housing is not an obvious one at first glance. Traditionally, the role of nonprofit and public hospitals has been to provide primary healthcare and additional health services to the public, often to select “catchment” areas or neighborhoods. The extent of these institutions’ role in housing was limited to either providing a) short-term inpatient beds for medical or treatment services, or b) residences for nurses or other hospital staff. Why then are more and more nonprofit and public hospitals becoming involved in...

Authored by: Richard Cho for CSH
Topics: Health, Homelessness, Housing, Partnerships, Research, Supportive housing
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 17, 2019
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April is National Child Abuse Prevention Month, an opportunity to recognize the importance and raise awareness of our roles —families, communities, service providers, researchers, policy makers and others— in working together to prevent child abuse and neglect and to promote the overall social, physical, and emotional well-being of children and their families.

Authored by: Jasmine Hayes for CSH
Topics: Child welfare, Family engagement, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Safety
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 17, 2019
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Publication Apr 12, 2019
In Richmond, Virginia, an interprofessional group of health care students and faculty members is helping seniors solve problems early.

Authored by: T.R. Goldman for Health Affairs
Topics: Dental, Health, Low-income, Mental health, Partnerships, Seniors
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 12, 2019
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Publication Apr 11, 2019
High-need, high-cost (HNHC) individuals are defined as people of all ages living with clinically complex needs and functional limitations who also incur high health care costs or are likely to do so in the near future. Despite frequent contact with the health care system and substantial medical spending, the physical, social, and behavioral health needs of these individuals often remain unmet due to uncoordinated and fragmented care. Studies suggest that HNHC individuals could benefit from a more holistic approach that coordinates the care they receive and addresses their unmet social needs....

Authored by: Janet Niles, Teresa Litton, and Robert Mechanic for Health Affairs
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Disabilities, Health, Research, Seniors
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 11, 2019
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Could Housing Solutions be Funded by Avoidance of Excess Shelter, Hospital, and Nursing Home Costs?

Authored by: Actionable Intelligence for Social Policy
Topics: Cost effectiveness, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Research, Seniors
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 11, 2019
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Publication Apr 10, 2019
A key challenge for states in ensuring access to care for the 85.3 million Medicaid beneficiaries is having a sufficient number of providers. The Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission (MACPAC) recently found that higher Medicaid fees are associated with higher rates of physicians accepting new Medicaid patients. Even so, acceptance of new Medicaid patients differs across specialties.

Authored by: Kayla Holgash and Martha Heberlein for Health Affairs
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Health, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 11, 2019
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Houston children continue to be poisoned by lead even though childhood lead poisoning is considered the most preventable environmental disease among young children. In the past three years, almost 1,200 Houston children between 0 and 72 months old were found to have lead in their blood above the reference value of concern set by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Houston Health Department (HHD) has hosted the Lead-Based Paint Hazard Control Program (LBPHCP) for over 25 years, with the goal of providing a lead-safe home environment through home investigations and home lead...

Authored by: Komal Sheth for All In: Data for Community Health
Topics: Early childhood, Health, Housing, Lead, Partnerships, Safety
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 8, 2019
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Publication Mar 26, 2019
As Wilmington’s Riverside community embarks on an extraordinary revitalization effort, Christiana Care Health System is making an impact on health with a $1 million gift to REACH Riverside Development Corporation that will support community health and youth development programs.

Authored by: Christiana Care News
Topics: Community development, Health, Housing, Low-income, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 4, 2019
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Publication Apr 4, 2019
The nation has large, pressing infrastructure needs, which are often felt most acutely in low-income communities due to decades of policy choices and lack of public and private investment. As federal lawmakers consider investing in infrastructure, a core priority should be to direct substantial resources across a range of areas to low-income communities, which could expand their access to safe living conditions and economic opportunity.

Authored by: Chye-Ching Huang and Roderick Taylor for the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
Topics: Education, Funding, Health, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Safety, Transportation
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 4, 2019
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Publication Apr 1, 2019
The Housing and Medicaid Services Pilot Program in Indianapolis, also known as the Blue Triangle Housing Program, is a collaboration that includes Anthem, the City of Indianapolis, a non-profit housing organization, and a community mental health center (CMHC).

Authored by: CSH
Topics: Health, Housing, Medicaid / Medicare, Midwest, Partnerships, Supportive housing
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 4, 2019
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Publication Mar 27, 2019
Housing is at the epicenter of all opportunities and outcomes. It is the first rung on the ladder to economic opportunity, and a person’s access to opportunity is linked with that of their community. From health, to economic mobility, to educational opportunity, to racial equity, and beyond, housing shapes families and communities.

Authored by: Maya Brennan and Veronica Gaitan for How Housing Matters, The Urban Institute
Topics: Asset building, Education, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Mobility, Racial inequalities
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 28, 2019
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Publication Feb 26, 2019
With different drivers but a shared set of goals, public health, health care, social services, and other sectors can come together to work upstream and develop creative solutions to solve the complex problems facing communities today. To that end, with funding from the Robert Wood Johnson, the Public Health National Center for Innovations and the Center for Sharing Public Health Services partnered to launch the Cross-sector Innovation Initiative (CSII). The goal of the CSII is to support, promote and disseminate learning about the role of governmental public health departments in aligning...

Authored by: Jessica Solomon Fisher for JPHMP Direct
Topics: Data sharing, Health, Partnerships, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 19, 2019