Resources

 

Welcome to Resources! Explore research, policy, news, and other resources related to housing, education, and health, as well as share your own content. Use the commenting feature to interact and collaborate with other users.

 
Found 39 resources.
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News Article Jun 29, 2017
One Summer Chicago Plus is a jobs program designed to reduce violence and prepare youth living in some of the city’s highest-violence neighborhoods for the labor market. This study was carried out over the summer of 2013 in partnership with the Chicago Department of Family and Support Services. It found that the program, which provided a six-week, minimum-wage job for 25 hours a week, reduced the number of violent-crime arrests for participants by 33 percent over the subsequent year. The One Summer Chicago Plus 2013 study—accompanied by a long-term follow-up of the 2012 program—closely...

Authored by: UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO URBAN LABS
Topics: Child welfare, Community development, Criminal justice, Out-of-school time, Partnerships, Preventative care, Safety, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Oct 15, 2020
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News Article May 6, 2019
Policymakers, academics and criminal-justice reformers all agree that access to education is both a front-end and back-end tool that decreases crime, increases social and economic mobility and supports informed, engaged citizenship. Not only is high-quality education effective, it is a lot less expensive than the cost of mass incarceration.

Authored by: Vivian Nixon for The Hill
Topics: Criminal justice, Education, Legislation & Policy
Shared by Housing Is on May 30, 2019
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News Article Apr 25, 2019
The Cook County Board on Thursday passed limits on the practice of asking potential tenants about their criminal histories, despite pleas to hold off until landlords and property owners had a chance to air their concerns.

Authored by: Rachel Hinton for Chicago Sun Times
Topics: Criminal justice, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Racial inequalities
Shared by Housing Is on May 2, 2019
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News Article Apr 21, 2019
The county’s preliminary results look promising: more than 78% of Vital clients were booked into jail less often once enrolled in the program for at least six months. On average, Vital participants went to jail about a third less often per year compared to the three years before their enrollment. A typical client had at least two fewer bookings into a King County Jail compared to the three years before entering the program.

Authored by: Vianna Davila for The Seattle Times
Topics: Criminal justice, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Mental health, Partnerships, Substance abuse
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 25, 2019
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News Article Apr 5, 2019
An Idaho lawsuit concerning how cities across the West enforce laws about sleeping in public—potentially changing how they treat their homeless populations—is now established as precedent. Barring a decision by the Supreme Court to address the case of Martin v. City of Boise, cities will not be able to arrest or punish people for sleeping on public property unless they provide adequate and relatively accessible indoor accommodations.

Authored by: Patrick Sisson for Curbed
Topics: Criminal justice, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 11, 2019
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Interactive
The Legal Bibliography is collection of 100+ papers, toolkits and other materials focused on privacy, consent and policy documentation. Co-developed by the Network for Public Health Law and Data Across Sectors for Health (DASH), the Bibliography is a growing resource for lawyers and community data practitioners, intended to support local collaboratives in their efforts to share data across sectors.

Authored by: Data Across Sectors for Health (DASH) and Network for Public Health Law (NPHL)
Topics: Criminal justice, Data sharing, Education, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Mental health, Partnerships, Safety
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 8, 2019
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News Article Apr 2, 2019
The dormitory-style transitional housing program, run by Portland-headquartered nonprofit Bridges to Change, is designed to repair some of the harm the criminal justice system historically has inflicted on communities of color.

Authored by: Zoe Sullivan for Next City
Topics: Criminal justice, Housing, Mental health, Metrics, Pacific Northwest, Racial inequalities, Substance abuse, Workforce development
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 4, 2019
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Publication Mar 1, 2019
CSH selected the Center for Data Science and Public Policy (DSaPP) at the University of Chicago to develop a web-based data integration tool, which was completed in 2018. The tool connects county jail administrative data from the justice system to homeless system data, through communities’ Homeless Management Information Systems (HMIS).

Authored by: CSH
Topics: Criminal justice, Data sharing, Homelessness, Housing, Midwest, Partnerships, Supportive housing
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 4, 2019
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News Article Mar 25, 2019
Many former offenders are denied housing — not because of the lack of funds or the failure to meet objective criteria, but because of their criminal history. Case in point: Matthew Charles, one of the first prisoners released under the First Step Act and one of President Trump’s guests at the State of Union address in February, has had difficulty securing an apartment, even with help from Kim Kardashian West.

Authored by: Karen Freeman-Wilson for The Washington Post
Topics: Criminal justice, Homelessness, Housing
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Mar 26, 2019
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Research Mar 20, 2019
Launched in 2016, the Denver Supportive Housing SIB aims to support residents struggling with homelessness, substance use, and mental health problems by increasing the number of people getting and staying housed and reducing the number of days they spend in jail. The permanent supportive housing model combines a permanent housing subsidy with wraparound services, such as mental health counseling, to help people improve their stability. In Denver, MHCD and the Colorado Coalition for the Homeless (CCH) were selected to offer these services as part of the SIB.

Authored by: The Urban Institute
Topics: Cost effectiveness, Criminal justice, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Pacific Northwest, Partnerships, Research, Substance abuse
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Mar 26, 2019
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News Article Feb 28, 2019
Child poverty in the U.S. could be cut in half over the next 10 years with a few simple steps, according to a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine. The cost would be high — at least $90 billion a year. But the National Academies report warns that the price of not doing anything would be far greater.

Authored by: Pam Fessler for NPR
Topics: Child welfare, Criminal justice, Early childhood, Education, Food insecurity, Funding, Health, Immigrants, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Nutrition, Racial inequalities
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 12, 2019
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News Article Feb 5, 2019
We beef up law enforcement to attack crime, devote more funding to try and improve inadequate schools and tackle health disparities by getting more people to the doctor. But what if Baltimore could solve all of its persistent social problems by getting rid of poverty?

Authored by: Baltimore Sun Editorial Board for The Baltimore Sun
Topics: Asset building, Criminal justice, Funding, Health, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Mental health
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 11, 2019
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Webinar Feb 28, 2019
Join us for an examination of how cross-sector data sharing initiatives are being used to tackle tough public health problems. The webinar will provide an in-depth look at a cross-sector collaboration in Illinois between public health, law enforcement, emergency medical services, a fire department and a jail aimed at addressing the needs of high utilizers of behavioral health services.

Authored by: The Network for Public Health Law
Topics: Criminal justice, Data sharing, Health, Mental health, Midwest, Partnerships, Safety, Stability
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 6, 2019
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News Article Feb 28, 2019
The city says it plans to move ahead with a costly, stopgap renovation of a New Orleans jail building to house dozens of inmates with mental health issues — but it also wants to keep its options open.

Authored by: Matt Sledge for the New Orleans Advocate
Topics: Criminal justice, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Mental health, South, Supportive housing
Shared by Housing Is on Feb 28, 2019
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Publication Feb 27, 2019
Over the past two decades, criminal justice reform has focused on evidence-based interventions to prevent arrests and incarceration and to facilitate community reintegration. These initiatives represent a movement toward a less punitive, more holistic approach to public safety, targeting critical social factors that lead to and perpetuate criminal justice involvement. Because housing problems are often a key underlying factor for people’s involvement with the criminal justice system, there are ways housing interventions can help lessen criminal justice involvement. Decriminalizing...

Authored by: Kimberly Burrowes for How Housing Matters (Urban Institute)
Topics: Criminal justice, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Research, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Feb 28, 2019
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Podcast
This episode features Martin Love, CEO and Jessica Osborne-Stafsnes, Program Manager at the North Coast Health Improvement and Information Network (NCHIIN) – a non-profit health information exchange in Humboldt County, CA. NCHIIN focuses on exchanging information across multiple sectors – including social care, medical care, behavioral health, criminal justice, education and more – to support care coordination and improve health. As an awardee of DASH CIC-START, NCHIIN worked with partners to add new organizations, sectors, and data streams to ACT.md, their care coordination and alerts...

Authored by: All In: Data for Community Health
Topics: Criminal justice, Data sharing, Education, Health, Mental health, Partnerships, West Coast
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Feb 20, 2019
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Publication Jan 17, 2019
The North Coast Health Improvement and Information Network (NCHIIN) was funded by DASH CIC-START to add new partners, sectors, mental health client summary data, and facility alerts to ACT.md, the care coordination and alerts notification system in Humboldt County, CA. As part of their CIC-START project, NCHIIN developed this document, which provides a methodology for onboarding new organizations, data streams, and sectors into the ACT.md platform.

Authored by: Data Across Sectors for Health (DASH)
Topics: Criminal justice, Data sharing, Health, Mental health, Partnerships, Substance abuse
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Feb 20, 2019
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Report Sep 4, 2018
This series of papers provides an overview and framework for reaching out to stakeholders or potential partners from other sectors that may share your interest in collaborating and sharing data to improve community health. Knowing your audience will help your collaboration craft a successful and productive outreach strategy, strengthen your partnerships, and ensure ongoing sustainability by clearly defining and articulating the value of sharing data across sectors.

Authored by: Data Across Sectors for Health (DASH)
Topics: Criminal justice, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Medicaid / Medicare, Partnerships
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Feb 20, 2019
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Publication Feb 6, 2019
Decent, stable, and affordable rental housing has the power to improve lives, yet background checks and other systemic barriers reduce housing access and stability for a large part of the population—people who have been arrested or who are reentering communities after incarceration. The number of people who can be shut out of rental housing by criminal background checks and related policies calls for a national and local conversation about evidence-based ways to balance public safety and cohesion goals while supporting people with justice system histories in finding stable housing. Achieving...

Authored by: Veronica Gaitan and Maya Brennan for How Housing Matters, Urban Institute
Topics: Criminal justice, Homelessness, Housing
Shared by Housing Is on Feb 7, 2019
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Policy Brief Jan 30, 2019
NLIHC stands ready to work with all members of Congress to seize the opportunity to address the full scope of affordable housing challenges for families with the greatest needs. In the memorandum below, we provide our recommendations on steps Congress can take—whether through an infrastructure spending package, the appropriations process, housing finance reform, or other legislative avenues—to make the critical investments in the affordable housing our nation needs to help the economy, our communities, children and families thrive.

Authored by: National Low Income Housing Coalition
Topics: Child welfare, Community development, Criminal justice, Funding, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Mobility, Racial inequalities, Safety
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 30, 2019
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Publication
Individuals transitioning out of the criminal justice system need a good place to call home so that they can reconnect with society and rebuild their lives.

Authored by: Opportunity Starts at Home
Topics: Criminal justice, Homelessness, Housing, Partnerships, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 18, 2019
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News Article Jan 7, 2019
Kansas officials see a solution to chronic homelessness and the burden placed on state institutions, jails and law enforcement in the work of a psychiatrist who believes mentally ill people can help themselves without any strings attached. The idea is to provide those who need treatment with unconditional housing and the support services they need, even if they are substance abusers who are likely to violate traditional program requirements for curfew and sobriety.

Authored by: Sherman Smith for The Topeka Capital-Journal
Topics: Criminal justice, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Mental health, Preventative care, Supportive housing
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 10, 2019
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Publication Dec 14, 2018
Health and reentry are closely related, and chronic medical, mental health, and substance use problems make it harder for newly released people to seek employment, obtain housing, and avoid reincarceration. Compared with the general population, justice-involved people tend to be in poorer health and need access to physical and behavioral health services, as well as the know-how and motivation to get care.

Authored by: Rochisa Shukla and Kamala Mallik-Kane for Urban Institute
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Criminal justice, Health, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Research, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 14, 2018
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Publication Dec 6, 2018
When we refer to people who are, or have been, in contact with the criminal justice system as “felons,” “offenders,” “inmates,” or “convicts,” we define them by the worst act of their lives, creating a stigma that lingers long after they’ve paid their debt to society. If we are serious about removing barriers for people with felony convictions, we must change the words we use to describe them.

Authored by: Cameron Okeke and Nancy G. La Vigne for The Urban Institute
Topics: Criminal justice, Legislation & Policy, Racial inequalities
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 6, 2018
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Report May 1, 2018
The Enhanced Transitional Jobs Demonstration (ETJD), funded by the Employment and Training Administration of the U.S. Department of Labor, tested seven transitional jobs programs that targeted people recently released from prison or low-income parents who had fallen behind in child support payments.

Authored by: MDRC, OPRE, and Employment and Training Demonstration
Topics: Asset building, Cost effectiveness, Criminal justice, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Research, Stability, Workforce development, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 19, 2018