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Elements of a Successful Partnership

With generous support from the MacArthur Foundation, CLPHA developed an in-depth report on regional housing-education collaborations taking place at housing authorities across the Pacific-Northwest.

Read the Multimedia Report
 

National Snapshot of PHA-Health Partnerships

The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) provides new data about public housing authorities’ partnerships with the health sector and offers recommendations to encourage collaboration between these affordable housing providers and their health system partners.

Read the Report
 
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Video
Community:
May 18, 2021
After over a year of remote learning, everything is out-of-school time at this point. With unknowns about vaccinations for children, communities should prepare for uneven plans across communities for summer and fall 2021. This discussion session focuses on capacity: how to support virtual and hybrid learning, how to counter learning loss, supporting parent engagement, supporting staff to support parents, providing adult socio-emotional learning, and providing connection to services. Panelists will share examples from on the ground, toolkits, and other resources, while also allowing time for small group discussion to share challenges and troubleshoot solutions.

Authored by: CLPHA
Topics: Attendance, Child welfare, Community development, Early childhood, Education, Grade-level proficiency, Out-of-school time, School-readiness, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on May 18, 2021
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Video
Community:
May 18, 2021
Keynote: Michael Bennet (D-Co), Congressional Video Message. Plenary: Reducing Childhood Poverty. Following Housing Is' 2019 Summit discussion of reducing childhood poverty and the idea of a university child allowance, this panel will explore the renewed discussion of legislation around a child tax credit and the idea of a universal basic income.

Authored by: CLPHA
Topics: Child welfare, Community development, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on May 18, 2021
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Podcast
Community:
Nov 23, 2020
“Bending the Arc” explores the everyday work of creating inclusive, equitable and racially just communities. This podcast spotlights bold thinking and action by creative, passionate, experienced thinkers and actors from cities and communities around the US and Canada. In this new episode we talk with Dr. Clinton Boyd, Jr., a Postdoctoral Associate at the Samuel Dubois Cook Center on Social Equity at Duke University. In our conversation we touch on a wide range of topics including our personal journeys as Black fathers, the undervaluing of Black men in general versus the idolizing of Black male athletes and entertainers, and what Clinton has learned from his research, including the Dads2Kids home visiting project. Clinton and Dr. Deirdre Oakley of Georgia State University co-authored an essay for the What Works volume on the role of Black fathers in mixed-income communities.

Authored by: National Initiative on Mixed-Income Communities for CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY
Topics: Advocacy, Community development, Racial inequalities, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 12, 2021

Bending the Arc Podcast: The Connection Between Black Fatherhood and Mixed-Income Communities

Podcast
Nov 23, 2020
National Initiative on Mixed-Income Communities for CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY
“Bending the Arc” explores the everyday work of creating inclusive, equitable and racially just communities. This podcast spotlights bold thinking and action by creative, passionate, experienced thinkers and actors from cities and communities around the US and Canada.
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Report
Community: Youth
Nov 3, 2020
As housing costs have escalated and inequities persist across the country, many young people need flexible, empowerment-based investments to get stably housed and onto a path to thriving. To this end, direct financial assistance (“cash transfers”) with other supports offer a promising solution grounded in a robust global evidence base. The circumstances of COVID-19 amplify the importance of developing and evaluating youth-informed approaches to doing things differently. This report shares results and implications of a year-long research and stakeholder engagement process that Chapin Hall conducted in collaboration with Point Source Youth to inform the development of a Direct Cash Transfer Program (DCTP) for youth experiencing homelessness. We look forward to piloting and rigorously evaluating a program based on these findings, starting in NYC.

Authored by: Matthew Morton for CHAPIN HALL AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO
Topics: Community development, Funding, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Nov 3, 2020
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News Article
Community: Youth
Feb 1, 2018
Chicago’s troubling homicide rate could be significantly reduced through a massive increase in state spending for Chicago schools. That's just one of the proposals floated Monday by a prominent University of Chicago economist Jens Ludwig. With a substantial commitment, he says homicides could be reduced by nearly 60 percent. Illinois is dead last when it comes to the percentage of education dollars provided by the state to its cities. Ludwig believes adding $1.7 billion dollars would not only bring Illinois up to the national average, but could substantially reduce gun violence as well. Given the social science evidence on the link between high school graduation and gun violence, that would be about a 30 percent decrease in the homicide rates in the city of Chicago for something that has absolutely nothing to do with the city of Chicago policies.

Authored by: FOX 32 CHICAGO
Topics: Child welfare, Community development, Education, Funding, Legislation & Policy, Preventative care, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Oct 15, 2020
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News Article
Community: Youth
Jun 29, 2017
One Summer Chicago Plus is a jobs program designed to reduce violence and prepare youth living in some of the city’s highest-violence neighborhoods for the labor market. This study was carried out over the summer of 2013 in partnership with the Chicago Department of Family and Support Services. It found that the program, which provided a six-week, minimum-wage job for 25 hours a week, reduced the number of violent-crime arrests for participants by 33 percent over the subsequent year. The One Summer Chicago Plus 2013 study—accompanied by a long-term follow-up of the 2012 program—closely examines the two to three years following the six-week program and finds that the reduction in violent-crime arrests is not driven simply by keeping participants off the streets during the summer. In fact, the decline in violence remains significant when the summer is ignored entirely. Researchers did find, however, that the program had no significant impacts on schooling outcomes or engagement, nor did it have a positive impact on formal labor sector employment for all of the participants after the fact. The authors do note that it is possible that significant labor market effects will develop past the three-year window examined in the study.

Authored by: UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO URBAN LABS
Topics: Child welfare, Community development, Criminal justice, Out-of-school time, Partnerships, Preventative care, Safety, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Oct 15, 2020

Chicago jobs program reduces youth violence, Urban Labs study shows

News Article
Jun 29, 2017
UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO URBAN LABS
One Summer Chicago Plus is a jobs program designed to reduce violence and prepare youth living in some of the city’s highest-violence neighborhoods for the labor market. This study was carried out over the summer of 2013 in partnership with the Chicago Department of Family and Support Services.
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Report
Community:
Jun 6, 2019
Trends in Housing Assistance and Who it Serves

Authored by: PAHRC
Topics: Community development, Disabilities, Education, Funding, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Partnerships, Research, Seniors, Workforce development, Youth
Shared by Keely Stater on Sep 10, 2019
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Publication
Community:
Mar 26, 2019
As Wilmington’s Riverside community embarks on an extraordinary revitalization effort, Christiana Care Health System is making an impact on health with a $1 million gift to REACH Riverside Development Corporation that will support community health and youth development programs.

Authored by: Christiana Care News
Topics: Community development, Health, Housing, Low-income, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 4, 2019

Christiana Care advances community health with $1 million gift to Riverside revitalization

Publication
Mar 26, 2019
Christiana Care News
As Wilmington’s Riverside community embarks on an extraordinary revitalization effort, Christiana Care Health System is making an impact on health with a $1 million gift to REACH Riverside Development Corporation that will support community health and youth development programs.
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News Article
Community:
Jun 11, 2018
At a recent public meeting, Sandra Lee Fewer, a member of the city’s Board of Supervisors, asked acting librarian Michael Lambert to explore whether future library renovations might include affordable housing. Fewer hopes to leverage existing public land to create multi-story facilities that include both libraries and housing.

Authored by: Steve Dubb for NPQ
Topics: Community development, Homelessness, Housing, Literacy, Low-income, Partnerships, Place-based, Research, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 29, 2019
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Publication
Community:
Jan 24, 2019
Affordable housing campaigns are not new, of course, but what is unprecedented and transformative about Opportunity Starts at Home is the scope and diversity of the partners that are joining forces to advocate for more robust and equitable federal housing policies. The campaign is advised by a Steering Committee including leading national organizations representing a wide range of interests that are working shoulder-to-shoulder to solve the affordable housing crisis.

Authored by: Opportunity Starts at Home
Topics: Asset building, Child welfare, CLPHA, Community development, Early childhood, Education, Food insecurity, Funding, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Immigrants, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Mobility, Out-of-school time, Partnerships, Racial inequalities, Safety, Seniors, Stability, Substance abuse, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 24, 2019

Within Reach: Ambitious Federal Solutions to Meet the Housing Needs of the Most Vulnerable People

Publication
Jan 24, 2019
Opportunity Starts at Home
Affordable housing campaigns are not new, of course, but what is unprecedented and transformative about Opportunity Starts at Home is the scope and diversity of the partners that are joining forces to advocate for more robust and equitable federal housing policies.
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News Article
Community:
Jan 10, 2019
Island School is one of 247 “community schools” in New York. These are regular public schools, with a twist. They have longer days and longer school years: Island stays open 12 hours a day, six days a week, including spring and winter breaks as well as the summer. A psychologist makes weekly rounds. A dentist comes by regularly. So does an optometrist, and students who need glasses get them free.

Authored by: David L. Kirk for The New York Times
Topics: Community development, Dual-generation, East Coast, Education, Family engagement, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Mental health, Metrics, Partnerships, Stability, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 10, 2019
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Research
Community:
Dec 5, 2018
How does the quality of where we live affect our children’s development? The impact of housing and neighborhood quality on physical health has long been studied in the public health field, but studies that aim to assess those same impacts on mental health are less common. This study examined the relationship between the physical quality of housing and neighborhoods and their interactive effect on the mental health and motivation of children from elementary school through young adulthood.

Authored by: Journal of Environmental Psychology
Topics: Child welfare, Community development, Housing, Low-income, Mental health, Racial inequalities, Research, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 6, 2018

How Housing and Neighborhood Quality Affect Children's Mental Health

Research
Dec 5, 2018
Journal of Environmental Psychology
How does the quality of where we live affect our children’s development? The impact of housing and neighborhood quality on physical health has long been studied in the public health field, but studies that aim to assess those same impacts on mental health are less common.
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Research
Community:
Nov 28, 2018
Research shows that the racial composition of the public school student population has changed substantially over the past 25 years, but student racial sorting among schools has remained relatively stable. A growing body of research shows that school segregation matters for the educational and socioeconomic outcomes of students of color. To fix it, however, we have to understand why racial segregation has persisted.

Authored by: The Urban Institute
Topics: Community development, Education, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Research, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 6, 2018
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News Article
Community:
Sep 24, 2018
The Housing Authority of the County of Los Angeles (Calif.) developed an innovative community garden to provide access to affordable and fresh food as well as skills training and job opportunities.

Authored by: Ashanti Wright for Journal of Housing & Community Development
Topics: Community development, Food insecurity, Green, Health, Housing, Low-income, Nutrition, Place-based, Sustainability, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Oct 30, 2018

The Growing Experience

News Article
Sep 24, 2018
Ashanti Wright for Journal of Housing & Community Development
The Housing Authority of the County of Los Angeles (Calif.) developed an innovative community garden to provide access to affordable and fresh food as well as skills training and job opportunities.
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Report
Community:
Oct 24, 2018
CLPHA’s Housing Is Initiative is engaged in a number of cross-sector activities focused on developing partnerships, facilitating a community of practice, resource development, promoting best practices, online collaboration, policy and advocacy, and training and education. Read about recent activities in this Fall Update.

Authored by:
Topics: Child welfare, CLPHA, Community development, Cost effectiveness, Data sharing, Early childhood, Education, Family engagement, Funding, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Mental health, Partnerships, Place-based, Post-secondary, Research, Stability, Substance abuse, Workforce development, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Oct 24, 2018
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News Article
Community:
Oct 9, 2018
Sweet Water Foundation transformed four blocks in Englewood to cultivate community and help build skills, resources, and opportunities for residents.

Authored by: MacArthur Foundation
Topics: Community development, Family engagement, Food insecurity, Green, Health, Low-income, Midwest, Nutrition, Partnerships, Place-based, Sustainability, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Oct 24, 2018
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Podcast
Community:
Sep 12, 2018
Opportunity Zones have the potential to make a huge economic impact on disinvested communities across the country. Host Justin Milner speaks with researchers Brett Theodos and Brady Meixell on how this brand-new economic development initiative works, and how we’ll know if it’s truly successful.

Authored by: Urban Institute's Critical Value Podcast
Topics: Community development, Low-income, Mobility, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Oct 10, 2018
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News Article
Community:
Oct 8, 2018
A strategy for community problem-solving does an extraordinary job at restoring our social fabric.

Authored by: David Brooks for The New York Times
Topics: Community development, Education, Partnerships, Place-based, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Oct 10, 2018
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News Article
Community:
Oct 1, 2018
Some places lift children out of poverty. Others trap them there. Now cities are trying to do something about the difference.

Authored by: Emily Badger and Quoctrung Bui for The New York Times
Topics: Child welfare, CLPHA, Community development, Criminal justice, Housing, Low-income, Metrics, Mobility, Racial inequalities, Research, Stability, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Oct 1, 2018
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News Article
Community:
May 25, 2018
Community organizations are improving health equity by tackling the cycle of poverty in urban neighborhoods.

Authored by: Jacqui Cook
Topics: Asthma, Child welfare, Community development, Early childhood, Exercise, Family engagement, Health, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Midwest, Nutrition, Obesity, Out-of-school time, Partnerships, Preventative care, Racial inequalities, Research, Safety, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Jul 11, 2018
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News Article
Community:
Jan 29, 2018
Chicago’s troubling homicide rate could be significantly reduced through a massive increase in state spending for Chicago schools.

Authored by: Larry Yellen for Fox 32
Topics: Child welfare, Community development, Cost effectiveness, Education, Funding, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Midwest, Research, Safety, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Jul 5, 2018
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News Article
Community:
Feb 15, 2018

Authored by: Jon Marcus and Matt Krupnick for The Hechinger Report (originally featured in The Atlantic)
Topics: Community development, Education, Family engagement, Low-income, Midwest, Post-secondary, Research, Workforce development, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Jul 5, 2018
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News Article
Community:
Jul 3, 2018
Researchers have shown — and teachers know — that schoolchildren exposed to neighborhood violence can have a tougher time learning, experiencing more stress and depression than their peers growing up in safe neighborhoods. But a Johns Hopkins University sociologist discovered that the consequences of neighborhood violence reach further than previously known, even spilling over to students who come from safe neighborhoods. Using crime and student data from Chicago, Julia Burdick-Will linked exposure to neighborhood violence to a drop in test scores, an effect that extended to students coming from communities that experienced little or no violence.

Authored by: Moriah Balingit for The Washington Post
Topics: Attendance, Child welfare, Community development, Depression, Education, Health, Low-income, Mental health, Midwest, Out-of-school time, Post-secondary, Racial inequalities, Research, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jul 3, 2018

What happens when schoolchildren live in violent neighborhoods? The effects are broader than previously known, a study finds.

News Article
Jul 3, 2018
Moriah Balingit for The Washington Post
Researchers have shown — and teachers know — that schoolchildren exposed to neighborhood violence can have a tougher time learning, experiencing more stress and depression than their peers growing up in safe neighborhoods.
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Report
Community:
Nov 1, 2017
Why do some neighborhoods appear able to launch effective local improvement initiatives, while others are more hampered by fragmentation and mistrust? Why can some communities mobilize diverse constituencies to influence public policy, while others cannot? Answers to these questions may be found in the specific patterns of collaboration that form among community organizations, and between these groups, schools, public agencies, and elected officials, according to MDRC, a preeminent social-policy research organization.

Authored by: MDRC
Topics: Asset building, Child welfare, Community development, Data sharing, Dual-generation, Education, Family engagement, Funding, Health, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Metrics, Midwest, Mobility, Out-of-school time, Partnerships, Place-based, Preventative care, Research, Safety, Stability, Workforce development, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jun 29, 2018

Network Effectiveness in Community Collaborations: Learning from the Chicago Community Networks Study

Report
Nov 1, 2017
MDRC
Why do some neighborhoods appear able to launch effective local improvement initiatives, while others are more hampered by fragmentation and mistrust? Why can some communities mobilize diverse constituencies to influence public policy, while others cannot?
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Video
Community:
May 23, 2018
The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) hosted The Housing Is Summit in Washington, D.C., on May 3-4, 2018 with 300 partners across the housing, education, and healthcare sectors. Access video recordings of the Summit's keynote speakers (HUD Secretary Ben Carson, John Bridgeland, Matthew Morton), plenary panels (on topics that cut across sectors like anchor institutions, data collaboration, stability, and foundation investments), and select breakout sessions focused on the intersections of housing, education, and health.

Authored by: Council of Large Public Housing Authorities
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Attendance, Child welfare, CLPHA, Community development, Data sharing, Dual-eligibles, Dual-generation, Early childhood, Education, Funding, Grade-level proficiency, Health, Healthy homes, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Mental health, Metrics, MTW, Out-of-school time, Partnerships, Place-based, Preventative care, Racial inequalities, Research, School-readiness, Seniors, Stability, Substance abuse, Supportive housing, Sustainability, TA, Workforce development, Youth
Shared by Steve Lucas on May 23, 2018

2018 CLPHA Housing Is Summit - Video Recordings

The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) hosted The Housing Is Summit in Washington, D.C., on May 3-4, 2018 with 200 partners across the housing, education, and healthcare sectors. The Summit highlighted the ways that we can transform systems to better serve low-income people with two days of plenary speakers/panels, breakout sessions, and caucus discussions geared toward intersectional thinking and ways to take action. 

Video
May 23, 2018
Council of Large Public Housing Authorities
The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) hosted The Housing Is Summit in Washington, D.C., on May 3-4, 2018 with 300 partners across the housing, education, and healthcare sectors.