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5th Annual Housing Is Summit on May 16-17

On May 16-17, over 300 practitioners, policymakers, executives, and researchers gathered in Washington, D.C., for CLPHA’s fifth annual Housing Is Summit, an event highlighting collaboration among the housing, education, and health sectors.

View Summit session summaries and video recordings
 

Elements of a Successful Partnership

With generous support from the MacArthur Foundation, CLPHA developed an in-depth report on regional housing-education collaborations taking place at housing authorities across the Pacific-Northwest.

Read the Multimedia Report
 

National Snapshot of PHA-Health Partnerships

The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) provides new data about public housing authorities’ partnerships with the health sector and offers recommendations to encourage collaboration between these affordable housing providers and their health system partners.

Read the Report
 

Housing Is Summit 2019: Keynote Recap

Day Two of this year's Housing Is Summit began with an electrifying keynote by Dr. Camara Jones, a renowned epidemiologist and public health leader, who talked about the role of "social determinants of inequity" as they relate to health disparities and disparities in other key outcomes. 

View summary and video recording of Dr. Jones' keynote.
 
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Publication
Community:
Apr 11, 2019
High-need, high-cost (HNHC) individuals are defined as people of all ages living with clinically complex needs and functional limitations who also incur high health care costs or are likely to do so in the near future. Despite frequent contact with the health care system and substantial medical spending, the physical, social, and behavioral health needs of these individuals often remain unmet due to uncoordinated and fragmented care. Studies suggest that HNHC individuals could benefit from a more holistic approach that coordinates the care they receive and addresses their unmet social needs. Doing so could improve quality of care and quality of life while reducing health care service use

Authored by: Janet Niles, Teresa Litton, and Robert Mechanic for Health Affairs
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Disabilities, Health, Research, Seniors
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 11, 2019

An Initial Assessment of Initiatives to Improve Care for High-Need, High-Cost Individuals in Accountable Care Organizations

Publication
Apr 11, 2019
Janet Niles, Teresa Litton, and Robert Mechanic for Health Affairs
High-need, high-cost (HNHC) individuals are defined as people of all ages living with clinically complex needs and functional limitations who also incur high health care costs or are likely to do so in the near future.
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Publication
Community:
Dec 17, 2018
In response to the heightened interest in the relationship between work and the health of individuals and communities, CMCS has clarified that Medicaid funds cannot be used to pay beneficiaries’ wages, but can pay for employment counseling as an optional benefit—to help people get jobs. Years of experience with work requirements for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, Aid to Families with Dependent Children, and populations with disabilities have developed the evidence for what is needed to help different populations find and keep jobs.

Authored by: Christopher F. Koller for Millbank Memorial Fund
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Disabilities, Health, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Research, Stability, Workforce development
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 17, 2018

To Work and To Love—Health in Theory and Practice

Publication
Dec 17, 2018
Christopher F. Koller for Millbank Memorial Fund
In response to the heightened interest in the relationship between work and the health of individuals and communities, CMCS has clarified that Medicaid funds cannot be used to pay beneficiaries’ wages, but can pay for employment counseling as an optional benefit—to help people get jobs.
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Policy Brief
Community:
Dec 3, 2018
Some seniors and people with disabilities receiving home- and community-based services (HCBS) could lose their Medicaid eligibility and have to go into nursing homes to get needed care if Congress adjourns without extending “spousal impoverishment” protections that are set to expire on December 31.

Authored by: Judith Solomon for The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Disabilities, Legislation & Policy, Medicaid / Medicare, Seniors
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 3, 2018

Protections for Married Couples Receiving Medicaid Home- and Community-Based Services End on December 31 Without Congressional Action

Policy Brief
Dec 3, 2018
Judith Solomon for The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
Some seniors and people with disabilities receiving home- and community-based services (HCBS) could lose their Medicaid eligibility and have to go into nursing homes to get needed care if Congress adjourns without extending “spousal impoverishment” protections that are set to expire on December 31.
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Webinar
Community:
Nov 14, 2018
In the first session of this series, Foothold Technology Director of Client Services, Paul Rossi and Senior Advisor, David Bucciferro, along with Sue Augustus from CSH, bring us back to basics of all things Medicaid. They cover topics ranging in commonly used terms, coverage and eligibility and the differences between Medicaid and Medicare. This webinar series is designed for beginners and experts alike. Beginners will walk away with a strong foundation and experts will have the opportunity to contribute to the conversation.

Authored by: Foothold Technology and CSH
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Disabilities, Health, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 14, 2018
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Policy Brief
Community:
Aug 9, 2018
Social determinants of health are the economic and social conditions that affect health outcomes and are the underlying, contributing factors of health inequities. Examples include housing, educational attainment, employment and the environment.

Authored by:
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Disabilities, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Mental health, Partnerships, Place-based, Substance abuse, Supportive housing
Shared by Housing Is on Aug 9, 2018
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Publication
Community:
Jul 27, 2018
On January 1, 2014, in states that have chosen to expand Medicaid eligibility under the Affordable Care Act, nearly all chronically homeless people who lacked health insurance became eligible for Medicaid. This Primer offers state Medicaid officials and other interested parties strategies for using Medicaid to meet the needs of this very vulnerable population--some strategies that have succeeded in the past and some that are emerging under provisions of the Affordable Care Act.

Authored by:
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Criminal justice, Disabilities, Dual-eligibles, Funding, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Mental health, Partnerships, Stability, Substance abuse, Supportive housing
Shared by Housing Is on Jul 27, 2018

A Primer on Using Medicaid for People Experiencing Chronic Homelessness and Tenants in Permanent Supportive Housing

Publication
Jul 27, 2018
On January 1, 2014, in states that have chosen to expand Medicaid eligibility under the Affordable Care Act, nearly all chronically homeless people who lacked health insurance became eligible for Medicaid.
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Research
Community:
Jul 19, 2018
The link between federal housing policy and public health has been understood since the nineteenth century, when housing activists first sought to abolish slums and create healthful environments. This article describes how the Obama administration—building on these efforts and those that followed, including the Great Society programs of President Lyndon Johnson—has adopted a cross-sector approach that takes health considerations into account when formulating housing and community development policy. The federal Department of Housing and Urban Development fully embraces this “health in all policies” approach. Nonetheless, the administration’s strategy faces challenges, including fiscal and political ones. Some of these challenges may be overcome by conducting quality research on how housing and community development policies affect health outcomes, and by developing a federal budget strategy that takes into account how investments in one sector contribute to cost savings in another.

Authored by:
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Community development, Disabilities, Health, Healthy homes, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Mobility, Partnerships, Place-based, RAD, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Jul 19, 2018

Health in All Policies: The Role of The US Department of Housing and Urban Development and Present and Future Challenges

Research
Jul 19, 2018
The link between federal housing policy and public health has been understood since the nineteenth century, when housing activists first sought to abolish slums and create healthful environments.