Resources

 

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Found 164 resources.
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Publication Oct 9, 2018
Women with children, especially, stay hidden in fear of losing custody of their children. As a result, we will never see them camping in tents or in downtown parks.

Authored by: Mary Ellen Mitchell for SchoolHouse Connection
Topics: Early childhood, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Safety, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 11, 2019
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Publication Jan 11, 2019
This short article expands on the press release issued last month by six national organizations. It explains why HUD’s data are so contentious, and why other data sources provide a more accurate picture of children, youth, and family homelessness.

Authored by: SchoolHouse Connection
Topics: Homelessness, Housing, Metrics, Research, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 11, 2019
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Publication Dec 1, 2018
A guide for youths who are or were homeless, or are at risk of experiencing homelessness

Authored by: U.S. Department of Education
Topics: Education, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Post-secondary
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 8, 2019
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Publication Jan 2, 2019
Housing quality, instability, and unaffordability threaten the well-being of millions of children across the nation. Research shows that housing is the first rung on the ladder to economic opportunity and that a person’s access to opportunity is intrinsically linked with that of the community where they live. As home prices increase, the gap between rents and incomes continues to widen, and nearly half of today’s renters are cost burdened. Child welfare professionals, educators, and pediatricians can strengthen their work by understanding the central importance of housing as a determinant of...

Authored by: Veronica Gaitan for How Housing Matters
Topics: Child welfare, Early childhood, Health, Housing, Research, Safety
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 7, 2019
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Publication Feb 8, 2018
Homeownership often translates to wealth accumulation, and wealth grows generationally. As a result, the wealth gap between white and black families has grown over the past 50 years. In 2016, white wealth was seven times greater than black wealth. Even if black families own homes, home equity does not necessarily provide the same savings and wealth-building opportunity as it does for white families.

Authored by: Janae Ladet for How Housing Matters
Topics: Housing, Legislation & Policy, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 7, 2019
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Publication Aug 22, 2018
Because many children attend elementary schools in their own neighborhood, a child’s access to high-quality schools is dependent on where they grow up. Racial residential and school segregation, along with policies and practices that inequitably distribute resources across neighborhoods and schools, have created a system in which students of color often lack access to high-quality schools compared with white students residing in the same region.

Authored by: Ruth Gourevitch for How Housing Matters
Topics: Child welfare, Education, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Research, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 7, 2019
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Publication Apr 10, 2018
State and local governments are debating and adopting new landlord-tenant laws and pilot programs, such as expanded legal representation and just-cause eviction requirements. Yet, few housing experts understand evictions well enough to channel the demand for change into clarity about specific eviction problems and potential solutions. Now is the time for policymakers and advocates to get smart. Here are five strategies for policymakers to consider as they address America’s eviction crisis.

Authored by: Maya Brennan for Urban Institute
Topics: Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Research, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 21, 2018
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Publication Oct 1, 2016
This report examines strategies used by local governments to address rising housing costs and displacement of low-income households in gentrifying neighborhoods. To assist tenants at risk of displacement, the report details strategies to regulate the landlord/tenant relationship well as strategies to provide assistance for households that move. To create and preserve affordable housing, the report explores ways to use city-owned land and other resources strategically to promote affordable housing in areas where costs are on the rise. It also examines ways to harness the market, such as...

Authored by: Jessica Yager, Luke Herrine, and Nadia Mian for NYU Furman Center
Topics: Community development, Housing, Low-income, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 21, 2018
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Publication Dec 1, 2018
New York City’s UAC has generated substantial interest as other jurisdictions across the U.S. consider or implement similar programs. In June 2018, San Francisco voters approved a ballot initiative requiring the city to establish, fund, and run a program to provide legal representation to all tenants facing eviction regardless of income. The Los Angeles City Council approved a motion in August 2018 instructing the housing department to develop recommendations for a new eviction defense bill or program.

Authored by: Vicki Been, Deborah Rand, Nicole Summers, and Jessica Yager for NYU Furman Center
Topics: Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 21, 2018
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Publication Dec 20, 2018
The Trump Administration proposed draconian changes today in a key SNAP (food stamp) rule which, if implemented, would cut off basic food assistance for hundreds of thousands of the nation’s poorest and most destitute people. The Administration and House Republican leaders sought, but failed, to secure these changes as part of the farm bill that Congress just passed. The Administration is now proposing to implement, through executive action, what it failed to secure through legislation.

Authored by: Robert Greenstein for The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
Topics: Food insecurity, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Nutrition, Workforce development
Shared by Housing Is on Dec 20, 2018
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Publication Mar 28, 2018
Communities can leverage local housing and neighborhood policies to address gun violence through tools such as demolition, vacant property maintenance and reuse, foreclosure mitigation counseling, homeownership support programs, code enforcement, and zoning.

Authored by: Christina Plerhoples Stacy for How Housing Matters
Topics: Community development, Housing, Partnerships, Place-based, Safety
Shared by Housing Is on Dec 20, 2018
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Publication Dec 17, 2018
Housing assistance plays a crucial role in stabilizing so many elements of a family’s daily life, including employment, education, and health. But despite its important role, our nation’s public housing program faces an uncertain future.

Authored by: Susan J. Popkin, Diane K. Levy, and Corianne Payton Scally for The Urban Institute
Topics: Funding, Housing, Legislation & Policy, RAD
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 17, 2018
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Publication Dec 17, 2018
In response to the heightened interest in the relationship between work and the health of individuals and communities, CMCS has clarified that Medicaid funds cannot be used to pay beneficiaries’ wages, but can pay for employment counseling as an optional benefit—to help people get jobs. Years of experience with work requirements for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, Aid to Families with Dependent Children, and populations with disabilities have developed the evidence for what is needed to help different populations find and keep jobs.

Authored by: Christopher F. Koller for Millbank Memorial Fund
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Disabilities, Health, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Research, Stability, Workforce development
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 17, 2018
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Publication Dec 17, 2018
Stricter work requirement policies for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) at the federal level were left out of the recently passed farm bill, but state policymakers are still considering whether to expand or establish their own work requirements for SNAP and Medicaid, with the goal of incentivizing employment. There’s no question that good jobs help spur upward mobility. But if we are serious about helping people work, we have to get serious about helping people improve their skills.

Authored by: Gina Adams and Shayne Spaulding for The Urban Institute
Topics: Child welfare, Cost effectiveness, Dual-generation, Early childhood, Food insecurity, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Research, Stability, Workforce development
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 17, 2018
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Publication Dec 14, 2018
Health and reentry are closely related, and chronic medical, mental health, and substance use problems make it harder for newly released people to seek employment, obtain housing, and avoid reincarceration. Compared with the general population, justice-involved people tend to be in poorer health and need access to physical and behavioral health services, as well as the know-how and motivation to get care.

Authored by: Rochisa Shukla and Kamala Mallik-Kane for Urban Institute
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Criminal justice, Health, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Research, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 14, 2018
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Publication Dec 1, 2018
Using a two-generation (2Gen) framework, Medicaid can be designed to support the social capital, health and well-being, educational attainment, and economic security of children and families, together, so they can maximize their health and thrive. This checklist outlines specific Medicaid policies and design choices adopted in Colorado to implement a 2Gen approach to improve the lives of children and families.

Authored by: Gretchen Hammer for Ascend: The Aspen Institute
Topics: Dual-generation, Early childhood, Family engagement, Health, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 13, 2018
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Publication Apr 1, 2018
Shining a light on supportive approaches to noncustodial parenting, specifically by looking at Colorado’s successful CO-PEP program.

Authored by: Reggie Bicha and Roxanne White for Ascend: The Aspen Institute
Topics: Dual-generation, Early childhood, Family engagement, Partnerships
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 13, 2018
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Publication Dec 1, 2018
With collectively more than 100 years of policy expertise and values-based leadership between us, Ascend at the Aspen Institute and the Housing Opportunity and Services Together initiative at the Urban Institute partnered to develop a set of recommendations on how to harness assisted housing and public-private housing partnerships for better outcomes for families.

Authored by: The Urban Institute and ASCEND: The Aspen Institute
Topics: Dual-generation, Early childhood, Education, Family engagement, Health, Housing, Low-income, Place-based, Research, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 6, 2018
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Publication Dec 6, 2018
The administration has proposed an expansion of the “public charge” rule that would make it more difficult for applicants whom officials deem likely to rely on public assistance to obtain lawful permanent residence (a “green card”) or a temporary visa. Among other changes, the rule would expand public charge determinations to include an applicant’s enrollment in the Medicaid program. Adding Medicaid to the list of public charge benefits that would be considered may force immigrants to choose between health insurance coverage and a future green card—with adverse consequences for parents and...

Authored by: Emily M. Johnston, Genevieve M. Kenney, and Jennifer M. Haley for The Urban Institute
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Health, Housing, Immigrants, Legislation & Policy, Medicaid / Medicare, Safety
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 6, 2018
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Publication Dec 6, 2018
When we refer to people who are, or have been, in contact with the criminal justice system as “felons,” “offenders,” “inmates,” or “convicts,” we define them by the worst act of their lives, creating a stigma that lingers long after they’ve paid their debt to society. If we are serious about removing barriers for people with felony convictions, we must change the words we use to describe them.

Authored by: Cameron Okeke and Nancy G. La Vigne for The Urban Institute
Topics: Criminal justice, Legislation & Policy, Racial inequalities
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 6, 2018
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Publication Nov 14, 2018
In collaboration with Project for Public Spaces (PPS), the National Main Street Center (NMSC), and others, the Bass Center will examine the place needs of people and businesses and use that knowledge to help public, private, and civic sectors leaders develop new approaches to creating and supporting concentrations of economic activity that drive inclusive economic growth. The Center is premised on the idea that these “economic districts” represent the geographies in which leaders can have the most transformative impact—where they can build local trust and understanding, experiment safely,...

Authored by: Jennifer S. Vey for The Brookings Institution
Topics: Community development, Low-income, Mobility, Partnerships, Place-based
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 5, 2018
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Publication Dec 5, 2018
The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 provides a new incentive—centered around the deferral, reduction, and elimination of capital gains taxes—to spur private investments in low-income areas designated by states as Opportunity Zones. This provision is based heavily on the Investing in Opportunity Act (S. 1639) introduced by Senator Cory Booker (D-NJ) and Senator Tim Scott (R-SC). Given the significant interest among investors, it is possible that this new tax incentive could attract hundreds of billions of dollars in private capital, making this one of the largest economic development initiatives...

Authored by: Bruce Katz and Ken Gross
Topics: Community development, Funding, Legislation & Policy, Mobility, Place-based
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 5, 2018
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Publication Nov 30, 2018
The uninsured rate among children rose in 2017 from 4.7 percent to 5 percent, a new report from Georgetown University’s Center for Children and Families finds — the first increase since Georgetown began producing this annual report a decade ago.

Authored by: Jesse Cross-Call for Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Child welfare, Health, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 30, 2018
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Publication Nov 28, 2018
Housing instability among families and children can be detrimental to child welfare, health, economic, and other outcomes. Policymakers and service providers in these fields should consider weaving housing into their approaches. Treating instability at its roots can relieve the trade-offs and stress that emerge when no decent housing is affordable. Evidence indicates that affordable housing can improve a range of outcomes for families and—in combination with short-term or long-term services—help providers tackle complex challenges head-on.

Authored by: Aaron Shroyer for The Urban Institute
Topics: Child welfare, Family engagement, Housing, Low-income, Stability, Supportive housing
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 29, 2018
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Publication Nov 20, 2018
People with mental health disabilities are vastly overrepresented in the population of people who experience homelessness. Of the more than 550,000 people in America who experienced homelessness on a given night in 2017, 1 in 5 had a mental illness. The proportion of people experiencing chronic homelessness with mental health disabilities was even higher—nearly 1 in 3. Despite this fact, the reality is that most people with mental illness fortunately do not experience homelessness: While about 20 percent of all adults in the United States have a mental illness, less than two-tenths of 1...

Authored by: Heidi Schultheis for Center for American Progress
Topics: Depression, Disabilities, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Mental health, Partnerships, Preventative care, Stability, Substance abuse, Supportive housing
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 20, 2018