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5th Annual Housing Is Summit on May 16-17

On May 16-17, over 300 practitioners, policymakers, executives, and researchers gathered in Washington, D.C., for CLPHA’s fifth annual Housing Is Summit, an event highlighting collaboration among the housing, education, and health sectors.

View Summit session summaries and video recordings
 

Elements of a Successful Partnership

With generous support from the MacArthur Foundation, CLPHA developed an in-depth report on regional housing-education collaborations taking place at housing authorities across the Pacific-Northwest.

Read the Multimedia Report
 

National Snapshot of PHA-Health Partnerships

The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) provides new data about public housing authorities’ partnerships with the health sector and offers recommendations to encourage collaboration between these affordable housing providers and their health system partners.

Read the Report
 

Housing Is Summit 2019: Keynote Recap

Day Two of this year's Housing Is Summit began with an electrifying keynote by Dr. Camara Jones, a renowned epidemiologist and public health leader, who talked about the role of "social determinants of inequity" as they relate to health disparities and disparities in other key outcomes. 

View summary and video recording of Dr. Jones' keynote.
 
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Community:
Jan 3, 2019
This analysis examines the location of families with children using vouchers in all U.S. metropolitan areas and in the 50 largest metro areas across multiple neighborhood characteristics. Using Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) administrative data and Census Bureau survey data, we compare the location of these families to the location of voucher-affordable units using three measures: neighborhood poverty, an opportunity index, and the share of residents who are people of color.

Authored by: Alicia Mazzara and Brian Knudsen for Center on Budget and Policy Priorities and PRRAC
Topics: Housing, Mobility, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 7, 2019
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Community:
Jan 1, 2019
Environmental health services, from asthma home visiting programs to lead testing, can help protect children from the dangerous environmental exposures they encounter every day. But the problem for parents and caregivers is accessing such services, a new analysis from APHA’s Center for Public Health Policy shows.

Authored by: Julia Haskins for The Nation's Health
Topics: Asthma, Child welfare, Health, Healthy homes, Housing, Lead, Low-income, Place-based, Preventative care, Research, Safety
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 7, 2019
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Community:
Dec 1, 2018
The conditions in which people live, learn, work, and play affect health in myriad ways. State Medicaid agencies are increasingly exploring opportunities to address these social determinants of health (SDOH) in an effort to provide more efficient care and improve health outcomes. As states begin to support these efforts, they are thinking strategically about how best to align SDOH-related activities with other reforms — such as value-based purchasing, care transformation, and the development of cross-sector partnerships.

Authored by: Center for Health Care Strategies, Inc.
Topics: Health, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare
Shared by Housing Is on Dec 19, 2018

Addressing Social Determinants of Health via Medicaid Managed Care Contracts and Section 1115 Demonstrations

Report
Dec 1, 2018
Center for Health Care Strategies, Inc.
The conditions in which people live, learn, work, and play affect health in myriad ways. State Medicaid agencies are increasingly exploring opportunities to address these social determinants of health (SDOH) in an effort to provide more efficient care and improve health outcomes.
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Community:
May 1, 2018
Housing and health systems need to work together. Public housing authorities (PHAs) are significant providers of housing to those in need, offering the health sector scale and expertise. Little was known about how PHAs worked with the health sector writ large. With a national survey, we found that PHAs across the country are engaged in a wide range of partnerships with different health organizations that address various target populations and health priorities. Barriers to housing-health collaboration, such as funding and staffing capacity, can be overcome with cross-system partnerships that seek to address these needs.

Authored by: CLPHA and PAHRC
Topics: Child welfare, Funding, Health, Housing, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Partnerships, Preventative care, Research, Seniors, Smoke-free
Shared by Housing Is on Dec 19, 2018

Health Starts at Home: A National Snapshot of Public Housing Authorities' Health Partnerships

Report
May 1, 2018
CLPHA and PAHRC
Housing and health systems need to work together. Public housing authorities (PHAs) are significant providers of housing to those in need, offering the health sector scale and expertise. Little was known about how PHAs worked with the health sector writ large.
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Community:
Oct 17, 2018
Prioritizing young children in Medicaid through cross-sector, innovative practice change has the potential to improve their lifetime trajectories, overall population health and long-run savings.

Authored by: Elisabeth Wright Burak for Georgetown University Health Policy Institute: Center for Children and Families
Topics: Child welfare, Early childhood, Health, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 13, 2018

Promoting Young Children's Healthy Development in Medicaid and CHIP

Report
Oct 17, 2018
Elisabeth Wright Burak for Georgetown University Health Policy Institute: Center for Children and Families
Prioritizing young children in Medicaid through cross-sector, innovative practice change has the potential to improve their lifetime trajectories, overall population health and long-run savings.
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Community:
Nov 1, 2018
The Colorado Division of Youth Services is working to transform the family experience by taking a two-generation (2Gen) approach to the services it provides.

Authored by: Tony Gheradini for Ascend: The Aspen Institute
Topics: Child welfare, Dual-generation, Early childhood, Family engagement, Low-income, Partnerships, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 13, 2018
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Community:
Nov 14, 2018
This report is intended as a practical tool for those seeking to understand how capital does and does not flow to communities, businesses, and households. This can inform efforts by community developers to identify projects in need of financing, raise capital, and design and market new financial products and services. We provide a concise how-to guide across five approaches to assessing community need, a four-step process to study capital flows, and eleven approaches to determining capital gaps. To help ground this, we provide examples drawing from original data about the Twin Cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota.

Authored by: Brett Theodos, Eric Hangen, Carl Hedman, and Brady Meixell for Urban Institute
Topics: Asset building, Community development, Midwest, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 12, 2018
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Community:
Nov 14, 2018
Denver’s expansion of supportive housing through the Denver Supportive Housing Social Impact Bond Initiative is beginning to pay off for the city of Denver, its homeless residents, and a group of investors banking on social impact. This fact sheet highlights interim results of the program.

Authored by: Urban Institute
Topics: Housing, Research, Supportive housing, West Coast
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 12, 2018

Finding Stability through Housing: Interim Lessons from Denver's Expansion of Supportive Housing

Report
Nov 14, 2018
Urban Institute
Denver’s expansion of supportive housing through the Denver Supportive Housing Social Impact Bond Initiative is beginning to pay off for the city of Denver, its homeless residents, and a group of investors banking on social impact. This fact sheet highlights interim results of the program.
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Community:
Sep 12, 2017
Broadband, especially wireline broadband in American homes, is the essential infrastructure for unlocking the internet’s economic benefits. However, broadband infrastructure is far from ubiquitous, both in terms of where it operates and who subscribes to it, and those deficits are not shared evenly across the country. As such, policymakers must understand how the national digital divide varies depending on the place.

Authored by: Adie Tomer, Elizabeth Kneebone, and Ranjitha Shivaram for The Brookings Institution
Topics: Broadband, Education, Low-income, Mobility, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 3, 2018
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Community:
Mar 14, 2018
There were 33,889 homeless schoolchildren in Florida during the 2007–08 school year, including children temporarily doubled up with others and children staying in hotels, motels, shelters, transitional housing, and unsheltered locations. By the 2015–16 school year, that number had risen to 72,601. This report suggests that the rise is because of the recession and foreclosure crisis, the state’s increasing shortage of affordable housing, and school districts training teachers, counselors, and other staff to identify students with no permanent housing.

Authored by: The Shimberg Center for Housing Studies and Miami Homes for All
Topics: Data sharing, Education, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Research, South, Stability, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 21, 2018

How Does Homelessness Affect Educational Outcomes of Children in Florida?

Report
Mar 14, 2018
The Shimberg Center for Housing Studies and Miami Homes for All
There were 33,889 homeless schoolchildren in Florida during the 2007–08 school year, including children temporarily doubled up with others and children staying in hotels, motels, shelters, transitional housing, and unsheltered locations. By the 2015–16 school year, that number had risen to 72,601.
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Community:
Oct 3, 2018
More than a third of homeless people are part of a family, most of which are headed by women with at least one child. Homeless families are different from single homeless people, and their needs differ. But limited research focuses on these families. This study aims to fill the gap by exploring longitudinal health service use and expenditures for homeless family members before and after entering an emergency shelter.

Authored by: Robin Clark, Linda Weinreb, Julie Flahive, and Robert Seifert for the American Journal of Public Health
Topics: Family engagement, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Preventative care, Research, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 21, 2018

Early Detection and Intervention Could Improve Health Outcomes for Homeless Families

Report
Oct 3, 2018
Robin Clark, Linda Weinreb, Julie Flahive, and Robert Seifert for the American Journal of Public Health
More than a third of homeless people are part of a family, most of which are headed by women with at least one child. Homeless families are different from single homeless people, and their needs differ. But limited research focuses on these families.
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Community:
May 1, 2018
The Enhanced Transitional Jobs Demonstration (ETJD), funded by the Employment and Training Administration of the U.S. Department of Labor, tested seven transitional jobs programs that targeted people recently released from prison or low-income parents who had fallen behind in child support payments.

Authored by: MDRC, OPRE, and Employment and Training Demonstration
Topics: Asset building, Cost effectiveness, Criminal justice, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Research, Stability, Workforce development, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 19, 2018
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Community:
Oct 1, 2018
Studies have consistently documented high rates of obesity and tobacco use among individuals with serious mental illness. In recent years, Medicaid programs have enrolled individuals with serious mental illness into managed care plans, which are responsible for ensuring that their members receive preventive care. Despite the movement to managed care, not much is known about whether this population receives routine screening and follow-up care for common comorbid health conditions and health behaviors.

Authored by: Jonathan Brown, Junquing Liu, and Sarah Hudson Scholle for Mathematica
Topics: Disabilities, Health, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Mental health, Preventative care, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 16, 2018

Health Screening and Follow-Up Care Among Medicaid Beneficiaries with Serious Mental Illness Enrolled in Managed Care Plans

Report
Oct 1, 2018
Jonathan Brown, Junquing Liu, and Sarah Hudson Scholle for Mathematica
Studies have consistently documented high rates of obesity and tobacco use among individuals with serious mental illness.
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Community:
Oct 18, 2018
A program called Find the Fit, which combines personalized planning materials and text messaging for students, and training webinars for advisors, increased the number and selectivity of colleges to which students apply. This report, the first from a six-year study, determined that Find the Fit led to some changes in the advising within Upward Bound and in students’ actions related to enrolling in a more selective college.

Authored by: Alina Martinez, Tamara Linkow, Hannah Miller, and Amanda Parsad for Mathematica
Topics: Education, Low-income, Post-secondary, Research, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 16, 2018

Study of Enhanced College Advising in Upward Bound: Impacts on Steps Toward College

Report
Oct 18, 2018
Alina Martinez, Tamara Linkow, Hannah Miller, and Amanda Parsad for Mathematica
A program called Find the Fit, which combines personalized planning materials and text messaging for students, and training webinars for advisors, increased the number and selectivity of colleges to which students apply.
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Community:
Nov 16, 2018
Housing and school segregation function as mutually-sustaining phenomena that limit perceived housing and school choices, constrain social networks, and curb employment and educational potential. Despite the link between housing and school segregation, however, many initiatives combating segregation tend to focus on one or the other instead of recognizing their inherent connectedness.

Authored by: Phillip Tegleler and Micah Herskind for the Poverty and Race Research Action Council
Topics: Data sharing, Dual-generation, Education, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Mobility, Partnerships, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 16, 2018

Coordination of Community Systems and Institutions to Promote Housing and School Integration

Report
Nov 16, 2018
Phillip Tegleler and Micah Herskind for the Poverty and Race Research Action Council
Housing and school segregation function as mutually-sustaining phenomena that limit perceived housing and school choices, constrain social networks, and curb employment and educational potential.
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Community:
Nov 1, 2018
These 65 million older households are highly diverse in their living situations, financial resources, health and functional abilities, and life stages, and thus require different types of housing to meet their needs and preferences. Affordable, accessible housing located in age-friendly communities and linked to health supports is in particularly short supply. Demand for these units will only increase when the baby boomers start to turn 80 in less than a decade. And whether they own or rent, millions of older households struggle to pay for their housing and other basic necessities, and their numbers are rising. Households now in their 50s to mid-60s are especially at risk of having insufficient resources to manage rising healthcare and housing costs in their later years.

Authored by: Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University
Topics: Health, Housing, Research, Seniors
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 14, 2018

Housing America's Older Adults (2018): A Supplement to the State of the Nation's Housing Report

Report
Nov 1, 2018
Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University
These 65 million older households are highly diverse in their living situations, financial resources, health and functional abilities, and life stages, and thus require different types of housing to meet their needs and preferences.
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Community:
Public schools identified more than 1.3 million children and youth experiencing homelessness and enrolled in school at some point in the 2016-2017 school year.1 These numbers do not reflect the total number of children and youth who experience homelessness in the United States.

Authored by: Katie Brown and Barbara Duffield for SchoolHouse Connection, Caitlyn R. Owens for North Carolina State University
Topics: Education, Homelessness, Housing, Research, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 14, 2018

Risk and Resilience: Differences in Risk Factors and Health Outcomes Between Homeless and Non-Homeless Students in 2017 YRBS Data

Report
Katie Brown and Barbara Duffield for SchoolHouse Connection, Caitlyn R. Owens for North Carolina State University
Public schools identified more than 1.3 million children and youth experiencing homelessness and enrolled in school at some point in the 2016-2017 school year.1 These numbers do not reflect the total number of children and youth who experience homelessness in the United States.
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Community:
Oct 27, 2018
National estimates are that roughly 80% of homeless mothers with children have previously experienced domestic violence. Even with its strict and limited definition of homelessness, applying this estimate to HUD’s most recent data reveals that over 230,000 children living in shelter have been exposed to the traumatic and long-term effects of domestic violence at some point. At a time when the nation is experiencing a national crisis of child homelessness, we can no longer afford to ignore this critical connection.

Authored by: Institute for Children, Poverty, and Homelessness
Topics: Child welfare, Domestic violence, East Coast, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Safety
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Oct 29, 2018
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Community:
Oct 24, 2018
CLPHA’s Housing Is Initiative is engaged in a number of cross-sector activities focused on developing partnerships, facilitating a community of practice, resource development, promoting best practices, online collaboration, policy and advocacy, and training and education. Read about recent activities in this Fall Update.

Authored by:
Topics: Child welfare, CLPHA, Community development, Cost effectiveness, Data sharing, Early childhood, Education, Family engagement, Funding, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Mental health, Partnerships, Place-based, Post-secondary, Research, Stability, Substance abuse, Workforce development, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Oct 24, 2018
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Community:
Assisted housing mobility is both a housing policy and a civil rights practice, giving low income families participating in our largest federal housing program – the Housing Choice Voucher program – a real choice to move to neighborhoods and communities of their choice, including high opportunity communities from which they have been traditionally excluded.

Authored by: Housing Choice Partners, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, Inclusive Communities Project, PRRAC
Topics: Education, Housing, Low-income, Mobility
Shared by Housing Is on Oct 12, 2018

Housing Mobility Programs in the U.S. (2018)

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Housing Choice Partners, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, Inclusive Communities Project, PRRAC
Assisted housing mobility is both a housing policy and a civil rights practice, giving low income families participating in our largest federal housing program – the Housing Choice Voucher program – a real choice to move to neighborhoods and communities of their choice, including high opportunity co
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Community:
Jul 26, 2018
Neighborhoods where insecure housing overlaps with higher rates of emergency department use may be promising areas for interventions under Medicaid value-based payment

Authored by: United Hospital Fund
Topics: East Coast, Health, Housing, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Partnerships, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Oct 10, 2018

New Report Identifies NYC Neighborhoods Where Medicaid Might Better Support Members’ Health by Addressing Housing Insecurity

Report
Jul 26, 2018
United Hospital Fund
Neighborhoods where insecure housing overlaps with higher rates of emergency department use may be promising areas for interventions under Medicaid value-based payment
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Community:
Sep 1, 2018
The Roundtable brought together over 70 experts from federal, state, and local government, the private sector, nonprofit organizations, and academia. The objective of the Roundtable was to “explore possibilities and limits of data sharing, and identify successes and proposed solutions for using data to address the opioid crisis.”

Authored by: The Center for Open Data Enterprise
Topics: Data sharing, Health, Partnerships, Substance abuse
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Oct 10, 2018
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Community:
Jan 1, 2015
Trauma-Informed Care (TIC) is a holistic approach to providing services, distinct from a clinical treatment model. It has its roots in the Vietnam era, and evolved through the turn of the century, with a particular focus on female survivors of physical and sexual violence.

Authored by: McSilver Institute for Poverty Policy and Research
Topics: Health, Mental health, Partnerships, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 18, 2018

Harnessing the Learning Community Model to Integrate Trauma-Informed Care Principles in Service Organizations

Report
Jan 1, 2015
McSilver Institute for Poverty Policy and Research
Trauma-Informed Care (TIC) is a holistic approach to providing services, distinct from a clinical treatment model. It has its roots in the Vietnam era, and evolved through the turn of the century, with a particular focus on female survivors of physical and sexual violence.
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Community:
Aug 13, 2018
Maternal depression is a widespread public health concern that has been linked to negative impacts on child development and health outcomes. Within home visiting programs serving low-income women, maternal depression rates have been measured as high as 61 percent. Home visitors are uniquely positioned to help address maternal depression and can play an important role in conducting screenings and providing referrals to community resources. This brief summarizes the existing research to illustrate the importance of addressing maternal depression in home visiting programs, and outlines three promising approaches.

Authored by: Rebecca Peters and Devon Genua for Urban Institute
Topics: Early childhood, Health, Homelessness, Low-income, Mental health
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 18, 2018

Addressing Maternal Depression in the Context of Home Visiting: Opportunities and Challenges

Report
Aug 13, 2018
Rebecca Peters and Devon Genua for Urban Institute
Maternal depression is a widespread public health concern that has been linked to negative impacts on child development and health outcomes. Within home visiting programs serving low-income women, maternal depression rates have been measured as high as 61 percent.
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Community:
May 1, 2018
Our initial report—which followed participants around the country over three years—found, among other things, that Year Up increased participants’ average quarterly earnings by more than 50 percent. These are the largest gains in earnings measured to date in random assignment studies of workforce training programs for youth and adults.

Authored by: David Fein and Jill Hamadyk for Abt Associates
Topics: Asset building, Education, Low-income, Mobility, Post-secondary, Research, Workforce development, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Aug 16, 2018

Bridging the Opportunity Divide for Low-Income Youth: Implementation and Early Impacts of the Year Up Program

Report
May 1, 2018
David Fein and Jill Hamadyk for Abt Associates
Our initial report—which followed participants around the country over three years—found, among other things, that Year Up increased participants’ average quarterly earnings by more than 50 percent.