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Elements of a Successful Partnership

With generous support from the MacArthur Foundation, CLPHA developed an in-depth report on regional housing-education collaborations taking place at housing authorities across the Pacific-Northwest.

Read the Multimedia Report
 

National Snapshot of PHA-Health Partnerships

The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) provides new data about public housing authorities’ partnerships with the health sector and offers recommendations to encourage collaboration between these affordable housing providers and their health system partners.

Read the Report
 
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Research
Community:
Jan 25, 2019
The employment social enterprise (ESE) model can provide an opportunity to create a financially viable business that helps individuals with employment barriers become integrated into the labor force. This research studied eight ESEs. Findings suggest that by applying private‐sector business principles to a workforce development programs, social enterprises can provide participants with meaningful and valuable work experience, while offsetting program costs. Analysis identified four promising practices that social entrepreneurs should adopt when setting up a new enterprise. Enterprises should (a) provide soft‐skill training and social services to participants; (b) operate at a size that allows for economies of scale in production and the provision of support services; (c) have few occupational skill requirements; and (d) hire supervisors with both industry knowledge and the capacity to support individuals with employment barriers.

Authored by: Mathematica Policy Research
Topics: Asset building, Low-income, Research, Workforce development
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 18, 2019

Doing Good While Doing Business Using Financial Viability to Enhance Employability for the Disadvantaged

Research
Jan 25, 2019
Mathematica Policy Research
The employment social enterprise (ESE) model can provide an opportunity to create a financially viable business that helps individuals with employment barriers become integrated into the labor force. This research studied eight ESEs.
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Research
Community:
Nov 19, 2018
With persistent concerns about health care expenditures, the health care field has recognized a group of patients known as super utilizers—people with complex health needs and socioeconomic challenges who have very high levels of hospital use. A well-publicized team-based care management model to address the needs of these patients is the hotspotting model pioneered by the Camden Coalition of Healthcare Providers in New Jersey, first brought to national attention by an article in the New Yorker in 2011. So far, interest in programs to help super utilizers has outpaced the available evidence on their effectiveness.

Authored by: Mathematica Policy Research
Topics: Health, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 18, 2019

High-Intensity Care Management Program Shows Promise for Reducing Hospital Use and Spending for Super Utilizers

Research
Nov 19, 2018
Mathematica Policy Research
With persistent concerns about health care expenditures, the health care field has recognized a group of patients known as super utilizers—people with complex health needs and socioeconomic challenges who have very high levels of hospital use.
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Research
Community:
Strengthening primary care is critical to promoting health and reducing costs in the United States. Comprehensive Primary Care Plus, or CPC+, is an advanced alternative payment model for primary care that builds on the foundation of the Comprehensive Primary Care initiative, implemented by the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Innovation from 2012 through 2016. The evaluation is assessing whether CPC+ achieves improved quality, reduced expenditures, and better health for Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries in thousands of primary care practices using a mixed methods study. We are analyzing claims data; survey and qualitative interviews with patients, primary care practitioners, practice staff, practices, and payers; and program data.

Authored by: Mathematica Policy Research
Topics: Health, Medicaid / Medicare, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 18, 2019
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Research
Community:
Feb 28, 2019
Findings from a national descriptive study of Early Head Start-Child Care Partnerships reveal new information about how partnerships expand access to high quality, affordable care for infants and toddlers. The study describes characteristics of these partnerships, including how they were formed and operated, as well as strategies for implementing partnerships in both center-based child care and family child care homes. It also describes the wide range of services that partnerships offer to children and families who receive care through Early Head Start-Child Care Partnership grant funds. Lessons learned from this study can inform ongoing and future activities of partnerships in early care and education programs as well as training and technical assistance efforts.

Authored by: Del Grosso, Thomas, Makowsky, Levere, Fung, and Paulsell for Department of Health and Human Services
Topics: Child welfare, Early childhood, Low-income, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 15, 2019

Working Together for Children and Families: Findings from the National Descriptive Study of Early Head Start-Child Care Partnerships

Research
Feb 28, 2019
Del Grosso, Thomas, Makowsky, Levere, Fung, and Paulsell for Department of Health and Human Services
Findings from a national descriptive study of Early Head Start-Child Care Partnerships reveal new information about how partnerships expand access to high quality, affordable care for infants and toddlers.
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Research
Community:
The U.S. has a shortage of seven million rental homes affordable and available to extremely low-income renters, whose household incomes are at or below the poverty guideline or 30% of their area median income. Only 37 affordable and available rental homes exist for every 100 extremely low-income renter households. Extremely low-income renters face a shortage in every state and major metropolitan area, including the District of Columbia. Among states, the supply of affordable and available rental homes ranges from only 19 for every 100 extremely low-income renter households in Nevada to 66 in Wyoming. Among the 50 largest metropolitan areas in the U.S, the supply ranges from 13 affordable and available rental homes for every 100 extremely low-income renter households in Orlando, FL to 51 in Pittsburgh, PA.

Authored by: National Low Income Housing Coalition
Topics: Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Mar 14, 2019
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Research
Community:
Feb 5, 2019
Housing is considered a social determinant of health, with poor housing conditions being associated with poor health. Veterans with disabilities are more likely to experience a housing crisis because of combat experiences and employment instability. We identified facilitators and barriers to finding and maintaining rental housing. We sought to understand the housing needs of Veterans with military-related disabilities using the biopsychoecological model (BEM) as an organizing framework.

Authored by: Semeah, Ahrentzen, Cowper-Ripley, Santos-Roman, Beamish, and Farley for Housing Policy Debate
Topics: Disabilities, Funding, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Research, Safety, Seniors, Stability
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 14, 2019

In Their Own Words: Veterans with Disabilities Share Their Housing Challenges

Research
Feb 5, 2019
Semeah, Ahrentzen, Cowper-Ripley, Santos-Roman, Beamish, and Farley for Housing Policy Debate
Housing is considered a social determinant of health, with poor housing conditions being associated with poor health. Veterans with disabilities are more likely to experience a housing crisis because of combat experiences and employment instability.
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Research
Community:
The lead article, “Landlords: Critical Participants in the Housing Choice Voucher Program,” provides a basic overview of the HCV program and the role that landlords play in it; examines the implications of voucher acceptance for assisted households; surveys existing research on landlord participation; and provides examples of the types of program and initiatives that HUD, PHAs, and local governments are pursuing to increase voucher acceptance. The Research Spotlight, “HUD-Sponsored Research Sheds New Light on HCV Landlords,” by Meena Bavan and Paul Joice, discusses the findings of two recent HUD-sponsored studies, “A Pilot Study of Landlord Acceptance of Housing Choice Vouchers,” and “Urban Landlords and the Housing Choice Voucher Program: A Research Report.” Finally, the In Practice article, “PHAs Encourage Landlord Participation With Incentives,” discusses initiatives in Marin County, California, and Cambridge, Massachusetts, that offer financial benefits, education, and streamlined administrative processes to encourage landlords to lease to voucher holders.

Authored by: HUD, Office of Policy Development and Research
Topics: Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Mar 12, 2019
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Research
Community:
Jul 21, 2018
A new study measured the mental health of Philadelphia residents before and after blighted lots had been converted into green spaces.

Authored by: Melissa Breyer for treehugger
Topics: Community development, Health, Mental health, Place-based, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 11, 2019
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Research
Community:
Mar 8, 2019
The number of kids enrolled in Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) — two government health plans for the poor — fell by nearly 600,000 in the first 11 months of 2018, a precipitous drop that has puzzled and alarmed many health policy analysts, while several states say it reflects the good news of an improving economy.

Authored by: Michael Ollove for The Pew Charitable Trusts
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Child welfare, Early childhood, Health, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Research, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 8, 2019

Child Enrollment in Public Health Programs Fell by 600K Last Year

Research
Mar 8, 2019
Michael Ollove for The Pew Charitable Trusts
The number of kids enrolled in Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) — two government health plans for the poor — fell by nearly 600,000 in the first 11 months of 2018, a precipitous drop that has puzzled and alarmed many health policy analysts, while several states say it refl
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Research
Community:
Nov 22, 2018
Improved access to health insurance contributed to reducing worry and stress associated with paying rent/mortgage or purchasing meals among low-income people. Expanding health insurance access may have contributed to increasing the disposable income of low income groups.

Authored by: Shiho Kino, Koryu Sato, and Iciro Kawachi for International Journal for Equity in Health
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Health, Housing, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Mental health, Research, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Mar 7, 2019

Spillover benefit of improved access to healthcare on reducing worry about housing and meal affordability

Research
Nov 22, 2018
Shiho Kino, Koryu Sato, and Iciro Kawachi for International Journal for Equity in Health
Improved access to health insurance contributed to reducing worry and stress associated with paying rent/mortgage or purchasing meals among low-income people. Expanding health insurance access may have contributed to increasing the disposable income of low income groups.
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Research
Community:
Nov 1, 2018
In this study, researchers conduct a literature review across public health, environmental health, medical, sociology, and urban planning journals to synthesize the research on the mental health effects of rat infestations on residents living in urban neighborhoods.

Authored by: Kaylee Byers, Chelsea G. Himsworth, and Raymond Lam for The Journal of Environmental Health
Topics: Health, Housing, Low-income, Mental health, Research, Safety
Shared by Housing Is on Feb 28, 2019

The Mental Health Consequences of Rat Exposure

Research
Nov 1, 2018
Kaylee Byers, Chelsea G. Himsworth, and Raymond Lam for The Journal of Environmental Health
In this study, researchers conduct a literature review across public health, environmental health, medical, sociology, and urban planning journals to synthesize the research on the mental health effects of rat infestations on residents living in urban neighborhoods.
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Research
Community:
Feb 21, 2019
In many cities, low-income residents live far from available jobs, and employers can’t find people to fill open positions. Economists call this “spatial mismatch”—a mismatch between where jobs are located and where job seekers live, which can cause high unemployment rates and lead to longer spells of joblessness.

Authored by: Urban Institute
Topics: Asset building, Racial inequalities, Research, Transportation, Workforce development
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Feb 28, 2019
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Research
Community:
Feb 20, 2019
As the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) prioritizes programs to help households receiving rental assistance achieve economic self-sufficiency, researchers, policymakers, and advocates debate the utility of work requirements as an effective pathway toward economic self-sufficiency and the risks of offering rental assistance on a conditional basis. This study contributes additional evidence suggesting that work requirements, when implemented gradually and in context with hardship exemptions and local supports, can boost annual household income, earnings, and the adult-employment ratio* for low-income households with no work history. But work requirements have little effect on those with prior earnings.

Authored by: Han Bum Lee and Paul E. McNamara for Housing Policy Debate (How Housing Matters, Urban Institute)
Topics: Asset building, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Research, Workforce development
Shared by Housing Is on Feb 21, 2019

Exploring the Effects of Work Requirements at a Small Illinois Housing Authority

Research
Feb 20, 2019
Han Bum Lee and Paul E. McNamara for Housing Policy Debate (How Housing Matters, Urban Institute)
As the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) prioritizes programs to help households receiving rental assistance achieve economic self-sufficiency, researchers, policymakers, and advocates debate the utility of work requirements as an effective pathway toward economic self-sufficiency
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Research
Community:
What is source of income discrimination, and who are the Rhode Islanders affected by it? The federal Fair Housing Act prohibits housing discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, familial status, sex, and disability. Rhode Island state law goes further, granting residents additional rights. Yet both still allow landlords to reject a prospective tenant based solely on where his or her income comes from, even when the applicant can lawfully pay the requested rent.

Authored by: SouthCoast Fair Housing
Topics: East Coast, Housing, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Feb 19, 2019
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Research
Community:
Jan 10, 2019
Local officials, impact investors, and philanthropy have important roles to play in helping communities access Opportunity Zone financing that benefits current residents, especially those with low or moderate incomes. Using Chicago and Cook County as a case study, we identify steps these actors can take to attract helpful, and limit harmful, investments. We find that the Opportunity Zones selected in Chicago and Cook County broadly fulfilled the incentive’s spirit, targeting areas that were more economically distressed. Going forward, it will be necessary to leverage available policy and philanthropic levers to compel private action in line with community interests.

Authored by: Brett Theodos and Brady Meixell for the Urban Institute
Topics: Community development, Funding, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Midwest, Place-based, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Feb 14, 2019

How Chicago and Cook County Can Leverage Opportunity Zones for Community Benefit

Research
Jan 10, 2019
Brett Theodos and Brady Meixell for the Urban Institute
Local officials, impact investors, and philanthropy have important roles to play in helping communities access Opportunity Zone financing that benefits current residents, especially those with low or moderate incomes.
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Research
Community:
Feb 5, 2019
Baltimore is the 30th-largest US city by population and is a study in contrasts. It has a low average income compared with other wealthy Northeast cities, has nine colleges and universities, and is a magnet for people pursuing higher education but has undergone decades of population loss. A large social sector provides important services to residents and buoys the local economy: nearly every third job in the city is with a nonprofit employer. But this also illustrates the city’s limited economic vibrancy. This mix of market and nonmarket forces makes Baltimore an important place to examine the geography of opportunity in an American city.

Authored by: The Urban Institute
Topics: Community development, East Coast, Housing, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Feb 14, 2019

"The Black Butterfly:" Racial Segregation and Investment Patterns in Baltimore

Research
Feb 5, 2019
The Urban Institute
Baltimore is the 30th-largest US city by population and is a study in contrasts. It has a low average income compared with other wealthy Northeast cities, has nine colleges and universities, and is a magnet for people pursuing higher education but has undergone decades of population loss.
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Research
Community:
Feb 6, 2019
Research suggests that living in concentrated poverty is harmful to health, well-being, and economic mobility. Inclusionary zoning can break up poverty density by imposing legal requirements to create affordable housing across neighborhoods. In Montgomery County, Maryland, inclusionary zoning laws require developers to set aside 12 to 15 percent of new homes at below-market rates and allow the public housing authority to purchase a portion of these units. As a result, two-thirds of public housing residents in Montgomery County live in economically diverse, low-poverty neighborhoods. To assess the effects of these unique conditions, researchers explored how public housing residents’ social networks, neighborhood perceptions, and health outcomes differ based on their placement in mixed-income communities or traditionally clustered public housing.

Authored by: Heather Schwartz, Susan Burkhauser, Beth Ann Griffin, David Kennedy, Harold Green Jr., Alene Kennedy-Hendricks, and Craig Pollack for Housing Policy Debate, How Housing Matters
Topics: Community development, Housing, Mental health, Place-based, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Feb 7, 2019

Inclusionary Zoning Can Improve Outcomes for Public Housing Residents

Research
Feb 6, 2019
Heather Schwartz, Susan Burkhauser, Beth Ann Griffin, David Kennedy, Harold Green Jr., Alene Kennedy-Hendricks, and Craig Pollack for Housing Policy Debate, How Housing Matters
Research suggests that living in concentrated poverty is harmful to health, well-being, and economic mobility. Inclusionary zoning can break up poverty density by imposing legal requirements to create affordable housing across neighborhoods.
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Research
Community:
Jan 1, 2019
Our aim with this environmental scan was to explore the capacity of public health to advance racial and health equity with community engagement as a central strategy. The partners had to make decisions about whether to be prescriptive in defining core constructs such as health equity and racial equity and whether to explore the public health system broadly or narrow our focus to governmental public health agencies specifically.

Authored by: National Collaborative for Health Equity
Topics: Health, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 31, 2019

Building Public Health Capacity to Advance Equity: A National Environmental Scan of Tribal, State, and Local Governmental Public Health

Research
Jan 1, 2019
National Collaborative for Health Equity
Our aim with this environmental scan was to explore the capacity of public health to advance racial and health equity with community engagement as a central strategy.
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Research
Community:
Mar 14, 2017
This brief examines the well-being of young children 20 months after staying in emergency homeless shelters with their families.

Authored by: Office of the Administration for Children & Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Topics: Early childhood, Homelessness, Housing, Literacy, Low-income, Research, School-readiness
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 29, 2019
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Research
Community:
Mar 1, 2018
Policymakers seek to transform the US health care system along two dimensions simultaneously: alternative payment models and new models of provider organization. This transformation is supposed to transfer risk to providers and make them more accountable for health care costs and quality. The transformation in payment and provider organization is neither happening quickly nor shifting risk to providers. The impact on health care cost and quality is also weak or nonexistent.

Authored by: Lawton Burns and Mark Pauly for Milbank Memorial Fund
Topics: Cost effectiveness, Health, Legislation & Policy, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 24, 2019

Transformation of the Health Care Industry: Curb Your Enthusiasm?

Research
Mar 1, 2018
Lawton Burns and Mark Pauly for Milbank Memorial Fund
Policymakers seek to transform the US health care system along two dimensions simultaneously: alternative payment models and new models of provider organization. This transformation is supposed to transfer risk to providers and make them more accountable for health care costs and quality.
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Research
Community:
Mar 1, 2018
Today, health care providers’ complaints about legal obstacles to health information exchange (HIE) may be better understood as reflecting concerns about the economic and competitive risks of information sharing.

Authored by: Michelle Mello, Julia Adler-Milstein, Karen Ding, and Lucia Savage for Milbank Memorial Fund
Topics: Data sharing, Health, Partnerships, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 24, 2019

Legal Barriers to the Growth of Health Information Exchange - Boulders or Pebbles?

Research
Mar 1, 2018
Michelle Mello, Julia Adler-Milstein, Karen Ding, and Lucia Savage for Milbank Memorial Fund
Today, health care providers’ complaints about legal obstacles to health information exchange (HIE) may be better understood as reflecting concerns about the economic and competitive risks of information sharing.
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Research
Community:
Sep 1, 2018
Systematic analysis of health care complaints can improve quality and safety by providing patient-centered insights that localize issues and shed light on difficult-to-monitor problems.

Authored by: Alex Gillespie and Tom Reader for Milbank Memorial Fund
Topics: Health, Research, Safety
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 24, 2019

Patient-Centered Insights: Using Health Care Complaints to Reveal Hot Spots and Blind Spots in Quality and Safety

Research
Sep 1, 2018
Alex Gillespie and Tom Reader for Milbank Memorial Fund
Systematic analysis of health care complaints can improve quality and safety by providing patient-centered insights that localize issues and shed light on difficult-to-monitor problems.
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Research
Community:
Sep 1, 2018
This article shows how a complex systems perspective may be used to analyze the commercial determinants of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), and it explains how this can help with (1) conceptualizing the problem of NCDs and (2) developing effective policy interventions.

Authored by: Milbank Memorial Fund
Topics: Health, Partnerships, Research, Safety
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 24, 2019

Systems Thinking as a Framework for Analyzing Commercial Determinants of Health

Research
Sep 1, 2018
Milbank Memorial Fund
This article shows how a complex systems perspective may be used to analyze the commercial determinants of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), and it explains how this can help with (1) conceptualizing the problem of NCDs and (2) developing effective policy interventions.
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Research
Community:
Mar 1, 2018
Medicaid coverage reduced the prevalence of undiagnosed depression by almost 50% and untreated depression by more than 60%. It increased use of medications and reduced the share of respondents reporting unmet mental health care needs by almost 40%.

Authored by: Katherine Baicker, Heidi Allen, Bill Wright, Sarah Taubman, and Amy Finkelstein for Milbank Memorial Fund
Topics: Depression, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Mental health, Metrics, Pacific Northwest, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 24, 2019

The Effect of Medicaid on Management of Depression: Evidence From the Oregon Health Insurance Experiment

Research
Mar 1, 2018
Katherine Baicker, Heidi Allen, Bill Wright, Sarah Taubman, and Amy Finkelstein for Milbank Memorial Fund
Medicaid coverage reduced the prevalence of undiagnosed depression by almost 50% and untreated depression by more than 60%. It increased use of medications and reduced the share of respondents reporting unmet mental health care needs by almost 40%.
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Research
Community:
Jan 23, 2019
This research brief explores how access to rental assistance affects the self-management behaviors of people with type 2 diabetes. Through semi structured interviews with 40 low-income residents of New Haven, Connecticut, diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, researchers analyzed the effects of housing stability and affordability on their self-care routines.

Authored by: Danya Keene, Mariana Henry, Carina Gormley, and Chima Ndumele for Cityscape
Topics: East Coast, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 24, 2019