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Elements of a Successful Partnership

With generous support from the MacArthur Foundation, CLPHA developed an in-depth report on regional housing-education collaborations taking place at housing authorities across the Pacific-Northwest.

Read the Multimedia Report
 

National Snapshot of PHA-Health Partnerships

The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) provides new data about public housing authorities’ partnerships with the health sector and offers recommendations to encourage collaboration between these affordable housing providers and their health system partners.

Read the Report
 
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News Article
Community: Youth
Feb 1, 2018
Chicago’s troubling homicide rate could be significantly reduced through a massive increase in state spending for Chicago schools. That's just one of the proposals floated Monday by a prominent University of Chicago economist Jens Ludwig. With a substantial commitment, he says homicides could be reduced by nearly 60 percent. Illinois is dead last when it comes to the percentage of education dollars provided by the state to its cities. Ludwig believes adding $1.7 billion dollars would not only bring Illinois up to the national average, but could substantially reduce gun violence as well. Given the social science evidence on the link between high school graduation and gun violence, that would be about a 30 percent decrease in the homicide rates in the city of Chicago for something that has absolutely nothing to do with the city of Chicago policies.

Authored by: FOX 32 CHICAGO
Topics: Child welfare, Community development, Education, Funding, Legislation & Policy, Preventative care, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Oct 15, 2020
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News Article
Community:
Jun 12, 2019
About half of the student body at one Ohio elementary school has witnessed drug use at home. Educators spend time every day teaching the children how to cope.

Authored by: Dan Levin for The New York Times
Topics: Child welfare, Early childhood, Education, Health, Substance abuse, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Jun 13, 2019
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News Article
Community:
May 6, 2019
Policymakers, academics and criminal-justice reformers all agree that access to education is both a front-end and back-end tool that decreases crime, increases social and economic mobility and supports informed, engaged citizenship. Not only is high-quality education effective, it is a lot less expensive than the cost of mass incarceration.

Authored by: Vivian Nixon for The Hill
Topics: Criminal justice, Education, Legislation & Policy
Shared by Housing Is on May 30, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Mar 18, 2019
It’s a prescription guaranteed to develop healthy brains, refine motor skills and prepare kids for school, doctors say. But few parents expect a physician to hand their children a book at their first wellness checkup at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus.

Authored by: Alissa Widman Neese for The Columbus Dispatch
Topics: Child welfare, Early childhood, Education, Health, Literacy, Low-income, Partnerships
Shared by Housing Is on May 30, 2019

Children's books handed out in medical offices to introduce kids to reading

News Article
Mar 18, 2019
Alissa Widman Neese for The Columbus Dispatch
It’s a prescription guaranteed to develop healthy brains, refine motor skills and prepare kids for school, doctors say. But few parents expect a physician to hand their children a book at their first wellness checkup at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus.
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News Article
Community:
Apr 30, 2019
Jonathan Rose is on a mission is to develop "communities that enhance opportunity for all." As the Founder and President of Jonathan Rose Companies, his firm’s work has touched many aspects of community health; working with cities and not-for-profits to build affordable and mixed-income housing, cultural, health and educational infrastructure, and advocates for neighborhoods to be enriched with parks and open space, mass transit, jobs, and healthy food

Authored by: Afdhel Aziz for Forbes
Topics: Education, Health, Housing, Partnerships, Place-based
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 30, 2019

The Power of Purpose: How Jonathan Rose is Creating 'Communities of Opportunity'

News Article
Apr 30, 2019
Afdhel Aziz for Forbes
Jonathan Rose is on a mission is to develop "communities that enhance opportunity for all." As the Founder and President of Jonathan Rose Companies, his firm’s work has touched many aspects of community health; working with cities and not-for-profits to build affordable and mixed-income ho
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News Article
Community:
Apr 21, 2019
An EdSource analysis of teacher salaries and rents reveals just how crushing California’s housing crisis has become for many teachers.Teachers at the bottom of the salary scale working in coastal or metro areas of the state are being shut out of affordable housing. Many are spending more than 30% of their salary on rent, the federal cutoff for affordable housing.

Authored by: Diana Lambert and Daniel Willis for The San Francisco Chronicle
Topics: Education, Housing, Low-income, West Coast
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 25, 2019

California's teacher housing crunch: Rising rents in coastal areas outpace pay

News Article
Apr 21, 2019
Diana Lambert and Daniel Willis for The San Francisco Chronicle
An EdSource analysis of teacher salaries and rents reveals just how crushing California’s housing crisis has become for many teachers.Teachers at the bottom of the salary scale working in coastal or metro areas of the state are being shut out of affordable housing.
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News Article
Community:
Mar 19, 2019
For 17 years, physicians, nurse practitioners and pediatric residents at our hospital, and presently, at more than 80 locations throughout the region, have been participating in Reach Out and Read of Greater Philadelphia (www.reachoutandreadphilly.org), a simple yet profound way to harness the power of a book to potentially alter a child’s health trajectory.

Authored by: Daniel Taylor for The Inquirer
Topics: Early childhood, East Coast, Education, Grade-level proficiency, Health, Literacy, Low-income
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 18, 2019

This Philly pediatrician always prescribes reading to patients and parents. Here's why.

News Article
Mar 19, 2019
Daniel Taylor for The Inquirer
For 17 years, physicians, nurse practitioners and pediatric residents at our hospital, and presently, at more than 80 locations throughout the region, have been participating in Reach Out and Read of Greater Philadelphia (www.reachoutandreadphilly.org), a simple yet profound way to harness the power
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News Article
Community:
Feb 26, 2019
More than half of students in the U.S. go to segregated or "racially concentrated" schools, according to the report. Those are schools in which more than three-quarters of students are white, or more than three-quarters are nonwhite. Researchers found that high-poverty districts serving mostly students of color receive about $1,600 less per student than the national average. That's while school districts that are predominately white and poor receive about $130 less.

Authored by: Clare Lombardo for NPR
Topics: Education, Funding, Legislation & Policy, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 4, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Apr 4, 2019
The nonprofit LIFT Orlando and AdventHealth have started construction on a “first of its kind” early learning center in the long-neglected West Lakes neighborhood south of Camping World Stadium, with an opening expected by August. The center will provide basic education as well as health and wellness programs, an on-site doctor or advanced nurse practitioner, mental health counseling and other services beyond the classroom. It can enroll up to 220 children from age 6 weeks to 5 years, with half of the openings reserved for kids from the West Lakes area, who will be accepted regardless of their families’ ability to pay.

Authored by: Kate Santich for Orland Sentinel
Topics: Child welfare, Early childhood, Education, Health, Low-income, Partnerships, Place-based
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 4, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Mar 18, 2019
The Department of Education reports more than 29,000 kids in North Carolina were considered homeless in the 2016-2017 school year. About three-quarters of those are living with other families because it’s too expensive to live on their own. According to Shantiqua Neely, it’s not necessarily because people don’t have jobs. She’s the executive director at A Child’s Place, the organization helps homeless CMS students and families. She said it’s because rent is too expensive.

Authored by: Alex Olgin for WFAE 90.7
Topics: Child welfare, Education, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Mar 26, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Mar 13, 2019
Universal meals allow schools to build the program into their overall curriculum, "creating a learning lab for healthy eating and a mealtime experience where every kid is equal and enjoys their meals together," according to Hunger Free Vermont, which says nearly a quarter of schools in the state offer them and studies show that the programs "increase participation, leading to better student health and learning, and a strong school meals business. When participation is up, school meal programs have more resources to invest in even higher quality food, including many local foods."

Authored by: Chris Mays for Brattleboro Reformer
Topics: Child welfare, Education, Food insecurity, Funding, Health, Nutrition
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 19, 2019

A push for universal meals

News Article
Mar 13, 2019
Chris Mays for Brattleboro Reformer
Universal meals allow schools to build the program into their overall curriculum, "creating a learning lab for healthy eating and a mealtime experience where every kid is equal and enjoys their meals together," according to Hunger Free Vermont, which says nearly a quarter of schools in the
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News Article
Community:
Feb 28, 2019
Child poverty in the U.S. could be cut in half over the next 10 years with a few simple steps, according to a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine. The cost would be high — at least $90 billion a year. But the National Academies report warns that the price of not doing anything would be far greater.

Authored by: Pam Fessler for NPR
Topics: Child welfare, Criminal justice, Early childhood, Education, Food insecurity, Funding, Health, Immigrants, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Nutrition, Racial inequalities
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 12, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Oct 1, 2018
When children get sick from poor living conditions inside their rundown apartments, they miss school. And when 95 percent of students of one school live in the same apartment complex—where evictions are routine and black mold is rampant—classrooms are often left empty.

Authored by: Jamie Hwang for the American Bar Association Journal
Topics: Attendance, Child welfare, Education, Health, Housing, Low-income, Partnerships, Place-based, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 11, 2019

Atlanta pro bono proram expands to resolve elementary school students' housing issues

News Article
Oct 1, 2018
Jamie Hwang for the American Bar Association Journal
When children get sick from poor living conditions inside their rundown apartments, they miss school. And when 95 percent of students of one school live in the same apartment complex—where evictions are routine and black mold is rampant—classrooms are often left empty.
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News Article
Community:
Feb 22, 2019
The grants provided under Assembly Bill 4702 aim to help colleges address hunger statewide, leverage more sustainable solutions to address basic food needs on campus, raise awareness for available food services, and continue to build strategic partnerships at the local, state and national levels to address food insecurity among students.

Authored by: NJBiz
Topics: Education, Food insecurity, Funding, Legislation & Policy, Nutrition, Post-secondary, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 4, 2019

Bill establishing hunger-free campus grant passes Senate, heads to governor

News Article
Feb 22, 2019
NJBiz
The grants provided under Assembly Bill 4702 aim to help colleges address hunger statewide, leverage more sustainable solutions to address basic food needs on campus, raise awareness for available food services, and continue to build strategic partnerships at the local, state and national levels to
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News Article
Community:
Feb 23, 2019
Gerrymandered school boundaries and greater transportation costs are the trade-off school districts must make in order to achieve racial integration and close the racial achievement gap, said a researcher from the Urban Institute.

Authored by: Roger McKinney for Columbia Daily Tribune
Topics: Child welfare, Education, Legislation & Policy, Racial inequalities, Research, Transportation
Shared by Housing Is on Feb 28, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Feb 21, 2019
Homelessness among students enrolled in schools from kindergarten through 12th grade has increased 70 percent over the last decade.

Authored by: Lauren Camera for U.S. News and World Report
Topics: Child welfare, Education, Homelessness, Housing, Research, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Feb 25, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Feb 14, 2019
This week, the Food Research & Action Center in Washington, D.C., published its annual School Breakfast Scorecard, analyzing school breakfast participation throughout the country for the 2017-2018 school year. Here are six things to know from the report.

Authored by: Benita Gingerella for Food Service Director
Topics: Early childhood, Education, Food insecurity, Health, Nutrition, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Feb 25, 2019

6 thins to know about the state of school breakfast participation

News Article
Feb 14, 2019
Benita Gingerella for Food Service Director
This week, the Food Research & Action Center in Washington, D.C., published its annual School Breakfast Scorecard, analyzing school breakfast participation throughout the country for the 2017-2018 school year. Here are six things to know from the report.
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News Article
Community:
Jan 30, 2019
FRESNO COUNTY, California - Research shows that a child's enviornment, where they live, can have a huge impact on the outcome of their education. We take a look at how Fresno County's philosophy about public housing is having a positive impact on families.

Authored by: Juanita Stevenson for yourvalley.com
Topics: Broadband, CLPHA, Education, Housing, Low-income, Out-of-school time, Research, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Feb 11, 2019

Inspiring the Valley: Positive changes in public housing creates a 'transformative' environment

News Article
Jan 30, 2019
Juanita Stevenson for yourvalley.com
FRESNO COUNTY, California - Research shows that a child's enviornment, where they live, can have a huge impact on the outcome of their education. We take a look at how Fresno County's philosophy about public housing is having a positive impact on families.
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News Article
Community:
Feb 3, 2019
As summer approaches, the West Virginia Department of Education is looking to partner with organizations in an effort to provide meals and activities for children while schools are out of session.

Authored by: Staff for Charleston Gazette-Mail
Topics: Education, Food insecurity, Low-income, Nutrition, Partnerships, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Feb 11, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Jan 20, 2019
Unlike elementary and secondary school students, whose families can get some support from things like federal free breakfast and lunch programs, for college students much of that assistance dries up.

Authored by: Deirdre Cohen for CBS News
Topics: Education, Food insecurity, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Post-secondary, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 28, 2019

Homeless on Campus

News Article
Jan 20, 2019
Deirdre Cohen for CBS News
Unlike elementary and secondary school students, whose families can get some support from things like federal free breakfast and lunch programs, for college students much of that assistance dries up.
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News Article
Community:
Jan 25, 2019
A whole host of factors — such as friends, housing and transportation — affect a person’s health and how much they need the social safety net. It’s time the government’s big health insurance programs took this reality into account, some lawmakers and policymakers are starting to argue.

Authored by: Paige Winfield Cunningham for The Washington Post
Topics: Asset building, Cost effectiveness, Disabilities, Education, Food insecurity, Funding, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Seniors, Transportation, Workforce development
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 25, 2019

The Health 202: Policymakers are realizing health is about a lot more than just care

News Article
Jan 25, 2019
Paige Winfield Cunningham for The Washington Post
A whole host of factors — such as friends, housing and transportation — affect a person’s health and how much they need the social safety net. It’s time the government’s big health insurance programs took this reality into account, some lawmakers and policymakers are starting to argue.
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News Article
Community:
May 15, 2018
Since federal public housing assistance was first created in 1939 amid the Great Depression, public housing advocates have struggled with how to move low-income families to higher-opportunity neighborhoods, typically defined as neighborhoods with less poverty (though experts argue there are other ways to measure opportunity, including quality of schools and access to public transportation, and KCHA uses a broader “opportunity index” to compare locations). The Moving to Opportunity program, a federal demonstration in the 1990s, documented outcomes of families moving to neighborhoods with lower poverty rates. The program didn’t show immediate health and economic gains at its conclusion, but in 2015, a landmark paper by Raj Chetty and others showed that for children who moved before the age of 13, the economic and social gains were dramatic. Not coincidentally, 12 and younger was the target age for kids participating in the KCHA opportunity moves.

Authored by: Rebecca Gale for Slate
Topics: Child welfare, CLPHA, Early childhood, Education, Mobility, MTW, Pacific Northwest, Partnerships
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 18, 2019

The Seattle Area is Solving on of Housing's Biggest Challenges

News Article
May 15, 2018
Rebecca Gale for Slate
Since federal public housing assistance was first created in 1939 amid the Great Depression, public housing advocates have struggled with how to move low-income families to higher-opportunity neighborhoods, typically defined as neighborhoods with less poverty (though experts argue there are other wa
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News Article
Community:
Jan 14, 2019
The San Jose Unified School District has its own plan: raze aging school buildings, send their students to new facilities, and turn that land into affordable rental housing for at least 300 teachers and school workers.

Authored by: Dana Goldstein for The New York Times
Topics: Education, Housing, Low-income, Partnerships, Stability, West Coast
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 17, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Jan 6, 2019
These programs, available at 10 Wichita middle and high schools so far, include extended serving times in cafeterias, grab-and-go breakfasts from carts or kiosks, and “second-chance breakfast,” in which students are offered breakfast after homeroom or first period.

Authored by: Suzanne Perez Tobias for The Wichita Eagle
Topics: Child welfare, Education, Food insecurity, Health, Low-income, Midwest, Nutrition, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 16, 2019

Lots of kids start the school day hungry. Here's how Wichita is trying to help

News Article
Jan 6, 2019
Suzanne Perez Tobias for The Wichita Eagle
These programs, available at 10 Wichita middle and high schools so far, include extended serving times in cafeterias, grab-and-go breakfasts from carts or kiosks, and “second-chance breakfast,” in which students are offered breakfast after homeroom or first period.
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News Article
Community:
Jan 10, 2019
The federally funded School Breakfast Program is critical to addressing childhood hunger and food insecurity. While most schools participate in the program, many students are reluctant to eat breakfast in the cafeteria before school starts — the traditional service delivery model for school breakfast. To combat this, four of the top organizations in education, food insecurity and school nutrition came together to form Partners for Breakfast in the Classroom, with the support of the Walmart Foundation. The Partners, which include FRAC, the School Nutrition Foundation, the NEA Foundation and the National Association of Elementary School Principals, are working to address barriers to school breakfast consumption through an innovative solution: serving breakfast in the classroom.

Authored by: Etienne Melcher Pilbin for Medium
Topics: Child welfare, Education, Food insecurity, Health, Low-income, Nutrition
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 16, 2019