Welcome to Housing Is, a hub for generating effective programs and sharing innovative ideas.

Sign Up or Sign In
 

Elements of a Successful Partnership

With generous support from the MacArthur Foundation, CLPHA developed an in-depth report on regional housing-education collaborations taking place at housing authorities across the Pacific-Northwest.

Read the Multimedia Report
 

National Snapshot of PHA-Health Partnerships

The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) provides new data about public housing authorities’ partnerships with the health sector and offers recommendations to encourage collaboration between these affordable housing providers and their health system partners.

Read the Report
 
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Aug 5, 2019
CLPHA developed a general data sharing template that public housing authorities (PHAs) and their health partners can customize to suit their data sharing and collaboration needs. Please feel free to comment to share any uses/modifications your organization made to implement into a partnership.

Authored by:
Topics: Affordable Care Act, CLPHA, Community development, Cost effectiveness, Data sharing, Dental, Depression, Dual-eligibles, Funding, Health, Healthy homes, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Mental health, Metrics, MTW, Nutrition, Obesity, Partnerships, Place-based, Preventative care, Racial inequalities, Research, SAMHSA, Smoke-free, Stability, Substance abuse, Supportive housing, Sustainability, TA
Shared by Steve Lucas on Aug 5, 2019

CLPHA Data Sharing Template for PHAs and Health Organizations

 

Disclaimer: This template is provided for informational purposes only and not for the purpose of providing legal advice. You should contact your attorney to obtain advice with respect to any particular issue or question. Use of this template, including its exhibits and attachments, does not create a relationship or any responsibilities between CLPHA and the user.

Research
Aug 5, 2019
CLPHA developed a general data sharing template that public housing authorities (PHAs) and their health partners can customize to suit their data sharing and collaboration needs. Please feel free to comment to share any uses/modifications your organization made to implement into a partnership.
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Mar 14, 2019
Despite abundant evidence about the effect of children’s socioeconomic circumstances on their transition to adulthood, we know much less about the effect of social policy programs aimed at poor families with children in facilitating how and when children become adults. This issue is particularly important for the U.S. federal subsidized housing program given its long history of placing subsidized units in some of the poorest and most racially segregated neighborhoods. Using counterfactual causal methods that adjust for the length of receipt of subsidized housing, I estimate the effect of subsidized housing on teenage parenthood, household formation, and educational attainment. I find that the subsidized housing program has either null or positive effects on the transition to adulthood and that these effects vary by both race and gender. These results underscore the importance of considering whether social programs have differential effects on the life chances of individuals based on both race and gender.

Authored by: Yana Kucheva for Demography
Topics: Homelessness, Housing, Racial inequalities, Research, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on May 20, 2019
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
May 18, 2018
Parent involvement is associated with child academic outcomes, positive behaviors, and social skills. This qualitative study explored school-based parent involvement barriers experienced by nine low-income mothers. In-depth interviews were used to collect data from mothers participating in a community-based program offered in a large public housing neighborhood. Findings included three main barriers: (a) cultural and language differences in their children’s school, (b) undertones of racism from teachers and parents, and (c) being the primary caregiver or sole provider for their children. Although all parents experience challenges to school involvement, low-income mothers face additional obstacles preventing them from engaging in their children’s schools. This perceived lack of school involvement can lead to feelings of helplessness, shame, and stigma.

Authored by: Stephanie Lechuga-Pena and Daniel Brisson for TQR
Topics: Education, Family engagement, Housing, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 25, 2019

Barriers to School-Based Parent Involvement While Living in Public Housing: A Mother's Perspective

Research
May 18, 2018
Stephanie Lechuga-Pena and Daniel Brisson for TQR
Parent involvement is associated with child academic outcomes, positive behaviors, and social skills. This qualitative study explored school-based parent involvement barriers experienced by nine low-income mothers.
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Nov 27, 2018
A growing body of research suggests that housing eviction is more common than previously recognized and may play an important role in the reproduction of poverty. The proportion of children affected by housing eviction, however, remains largely unknown. We estimate that one in seven children born in large U.S. cities in 1998–2000 experienced at least one eviction for nonpayment of rent or mortgage between birth and age 15. Rates of eviction were substantial across all cities and demographic groups studied, but children from disadvantaged backgrounds were most likely to experience eviction. Among those born into deep poverty, we estimate that approximately one in four were evicted by age 15. Given prior evidence that forced moves have negative consequences for children, we conclude that the high prevalence and social stratification of housing eviction are sufficient to play an important role in the reproduction of poverty and warrant greater policy attention.

Authored by: Ian Lundberg and Louis Donnelly
Topics: Early childhood, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 18, 2019

A Research Note on the Prevalance of Housing Eviction Among Children Born in U.S. Cities

Research
Nov 27, 2018
Ian Lundberg and Louis Donnelly
A growing body of research suggests that housing eviction is more common than previously recognized and may play an important role in the reproduction of poverty. The proportion of children affected by housing eviction, however, remains largely unknown.
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Jun 18, 2018
The social, economic, and physical environments in which older adults live play a vital role in healthy, active, and engaged lives. But older adults live in unequal environments. Low-income older adults and older racial-ethnic minorities are more likely to live in neighborhoods characterized by poverty, disorder, lack of social cohesion, and pollution. At all income levels there is a greater proportion of older racial-ethnic minorities in neighborhoods with economic, social, and physical problems. Neighborhood inequality may contribute to disparities in the aging experience.

Authored by: Jennifer Ailshire and Catherine Garcia for Generations (also featured by How Housing Matters at The Urban Institute)
Topics: Housing, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Seniors
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 11, 2019

Unequal Places: The Impacts of Socioeconomic and Race/Ethnic Differences in Neighborhoods

Research
Jun 18, 2018
Jennifer Ailshire and Catherine Garcia for Generations (also featured by How Housing Matters at The Urban Institute)
The social, economic, and physical environments in which older adults live play a vital role in healthy, active, and engaged lives. But older adults live in unequal environments.
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Feb 22, 2019
Thoughtfully developed, accessible communities may boost parent engagement and student outcomes in low-income neighborhoods

Authored by: Rachel Sturtz for University of Colorado Denver
Topics: Community development, Education, Family engagement, Housing, Low-income, Partnerships, Racial inequalities, Transportation
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 4, 2019
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Feb 1, 2019
The authors draw on interviews with 50 families in Cleveland and its suburbs to uncover their experiences in choosing a home and school for their children in the suburbs. Nearly all families were seeking the “package deal”— good schools in good neighborhoods — and looked to the suburbs to find it. Families were often convinced of the superior quality of suburban schools but, owing to the legacies of enduring structural racism and emerging segregation in the suburbs, Black families were more likely to be disappointed in their suburban schools than their white counterparts. Families of color were also constrained by the legacies of enduring structural racism that has reproduced racial inequalities.

Authored by: Anna Rhodes and Siri Warkentien for How Housing Matters Research (MacArthur Foundation)
Topics: Education, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 28, 2019

Even As The Suburbs Diversify, Racial Inequality Persists in Suburban Schools

Research
Feb 1, 2019
Anna Rhodes and Siri Warkentien for How Housing Matters Research (MacArthur Foundation)
The authors draw on interviews with 50 families in Cleveland and its suburbs to uncover their experiences in choosing a home and school for their children in the suburbs. Nearly all families were seeking the “package deal”— good schools in good neighborhoods — and looked to the suburbs to find it.
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Feb 21, 2019
In many cities, low-income residents live far from available jobs, and employers can’t find people to fill open positions. Economists call this “spatial mismatch”—a mismatch between where jobs are located and where job seekers live, which can cause high unemployment rates and lead to longer spells of joblessness.

Authored by: Urban Institute
Topics: Asset building, Racial inequalities, Research, Transportation, Workforce development
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Feb 28, 2019
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
What is source of income discrimination, and who are the Rhode Islanders affected by it? The federal Fair Housing Act prohibits housing discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, familial status, sex, and disability. Rhode Island state law goes further, granting residents additional rights. Yet both still allow landlords to reject a prospective tenant based solely on where his or her income comes from, even when the applicant can lawfully pay the requested rent.

Authored by: SouthCoast Fair Housing
Topics: East Coast, Housing, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Feb 19, 2019
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Feb 5, 2019
Baltimore is the 30th-largest US city by population and is a study in contrasts. It has a low average income compared with other wealthy Northeast cities, has nine colleges and universities, and is a magnet for people pursuing higher education but has undergone decades of population loss. A large social sector provides important services to residents and buoys the local economy: nearly every third job in the city is with a nonprofit employer. But this also illustrates the city’s limited economic vibrancy. This mix of market and nonmarket forces makes Baltimore an important place to examine the geography of opportunity in an American city.

Authored by: The Urban Institute
Topics: Community development, East Coast, Housing, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Feb 14, 2019

"The Black Butterfly:" Racial Segregation and Investment Patterns in Baltimore

Research
Feb 5, 2019
The Urban Institute
Baltimore is the 30th-largest US city by population and is a study in contrasts. It has a low average income compared with other wealthy Northeast cities, has nine colleges and universities, and is a magnet for people pursuing higher education but has undergone decades of population loss.
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Jan 1, 2019
Our aim with this environmental scan was to explore the capacity of public health to advance racial and health equity with community engagement as a central strategy. The partners had to make decisions about whether to be prescriptive in defining core constructs such as health equity and racial equity and whether to explore the public health system broadly or narrow our focus to governmental public health agencies specifically.

Authored by: National Collaborative for Health Equity
Topics: Health, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 31, 2019

Building Public Health Capacity to Advance Equity: A National Environmental Scan of Tribal, State, and Local Governmental Public Health

Research
Jan 1, 2019
National Collaborative for Health Equity
Our aim with this environmental scan was to explore the capacity of public health to advance racial and health equity with community engagement as a central strategy.
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Jan 16, 2019
This study explores the different ways undocumented status is associated with residential decisions and its implications on residential segregation. Drawing on 47 interviews with 20 undocumented-headed Mexican households in Dallas County, Texas, researchers examine the drivers of residential decisionmaking and illustrate the complex trade-offs undocumented households make between neighborhood quality and legal risk.

Authored by: How Housing Matters, Asad L. Asad and Eva Rosen for the Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
Topics: Housing, Immigrants, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Mobility, Racial inequalities, South
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 17, 2019
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Sep 12, 2018
Eviction provides a clear window for understanding housing, racial injustice, and poverty in cities. In the face of the eviction crisis, national researchers, community organizers, and other civic actors have rallied together to document data and call attention to this crisis. One of these collective efforts is the Kansas City Eviction Project (KC Eviction Project), a collaboration between researchers, community organizers, neighborhood leaders, lawyers, and policymakers. KC Eviction Project compiled a dataset of evictions in Jackson County, Missouri, which encompasses most of metropolitan Kansas City, Missouri. The data, obtained through county court electronic records, include eviction filings from 1999 to 2017.

Authored by: Tara Raghuveer for How Housing Matters
Topics: Housing, Midwest, Racial inequalities
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 7, 2019

Kansas City Eviction Research Highlights the Need for Bold Municipal Solutions

Research
Sep 12, 2018
Tara Raghuveer for How Housing Matters
Eviction provides a clear window for understanding housing, racial injustice, and poverty in cities. In the face of the eviction crisis, national researchers, community organizers, and other civic actors have rallied together to document data and call attention to this crisis.
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Aug 19, 2018
On the 50th anniversary of the Fair Housing Act, there is growing discussion and concern about gentrification. In almost every American city, long-time residents feel increasingly anxious that they will be priced out of their homes and communities, as growing numbers of higher-income, college-educated households opt for downtown neighborhoods. Yet when looking through the lens of fair housing, gentrification also offers a glimmer of hope, as the moves that higher-income, white households make into predominantly minority, lower-income neighborhoods are moves that help to integrate those neighborhoods, at least in the near-term. The key question is whether this integration will last and help to deliver on the promise of the Fair Housing Act to promote and further integrated living. Inverting the famous words of community organizer Saul Alinsky, this integration may only be the time between when the first white moves in and the last family of color moves out.

Authored by: Ingrid Gould Ellen and Gerard Torrats-Espinosa for NYU Furman Center
Topics: Community development, Housing, Low-income, Mobility, Racial inequalities, Research, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 19, 2018
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Nov 19, 2018
Nearly 115,000 students in New York City schools experienced homelessness during the 2017–18 school year, according to new data released by the New York State Education Department (NYSED) last month. As reported by the New York Times, that figure represents 1 in 10 New York City public and charter school students. Our look at the data on noncharter public school students shows that even that alarming share hides the pervasiveness of student homelessness in some communities.

Authored by: Patrick Spauster for Urban Institute
Topics: Child welfare, East Coast, Education, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Research, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 12, 2018
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Dec 5, 2018
How does the quality of where we live affect our children’s development? The impact of housing and neighborhood quality on physical health has long been studied in the public health field, but studies that aim to assess those same impacts on mental health are less common. This study examined the relationship between the physical quality of housing and neighborhoods and their interactive effect on the mental health and motivation of children from elementary school through young adulthood.

Authored by: Journal of Environmental Psychology
Topics: Child welfare, Community development, Housing, Low-income, Mental health, Racial inequalities, Research, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 6, 2018

How Housing and Neighborhood Quality Affect Children's Mental Health

Research
Dec 5, 2018
Journal of Environmental Psychology
How does the quality of where we live affect our children’s development? The impact of housing and neighborhood quality on physical health has long been studied in the public health field, but studies that aim to assess those same impacts on mental health are less common.
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Nov 28, 2018
Research shows that the racial composition of the public school student population has changed substantially over the past 25 years, but student racial sorting among schools has remained relatively stable. A growing body of research shows that school segregation matters for the educational and socioeconomic outcomes of students of color. To fix it, however, we have to understand why racial segregation has persisted.

Authored by: The Urban Institute
Topics: Community development, Education, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Research, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 6, 2018
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Oct 26, 2018
Some 15% of U.S. households with school-age children do not have a high-speed internet connection at home, according to a new Pew Research Center analysis of 2015 U.S. Census Bureau data. New survey findings from the Center also show that some teens are more likely to face digital hurdles when trying to complete their homework.

Authored by: Monica Anderson and Andrew Perrin for Pew Research Center
Topics: Broadband, Education, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 3, 2018
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Nov 14, 2018
Now that free and reduced price lunch (FRPL) status as an indicator of economic disadvantage is in decline, stakeholders are turning to replacement measures. Given the extent of socioeconomic and racial segregation in most school districts, neighborhood-level measures of economic distress seem like an appealing, easy-to-measure alternative, but this seemingly intuitive solution does a bad job of predicting FRPL rates and performs worse in places where it is more critical to get it right.

Authored by: Tomas Monarrez for The Urban Institute
Topics: Education, Health, Housing, Low-income, Metrics, Place-based, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 14, 2018
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
The housing choice voucher program aims to reduce housing cost burdens as well as to enable recipients to move to a broader diversity of neighborhoods. Prior evidence shows voucher recipients still end up in neighborhoods with relatively high poverty rates and low performing schools. These constrained neighborhood choices can in part be attributed to landlord discrimination and the geographic concentration of units that rent below voucher caps. In this paper, we consider an additional explanation: the role of information and social influence in determining the effective set of potential housing choices.

Authored by: Journal of Housing Economics
Topics: Housing, Mobility, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 14, 2018

Neighbors and networks: The role of social interactions on the residential choices of housing choice voucher holders

Research
Journal of Housing Economics
The housing choice voucher program aims to reduce housing cost burdens as well as to enable recipients to move to a broader diversity of neighborhoods. Prior evidence shows voucher recipients still end up in neighborhoods with relatively high poverty rates and low performing schools.
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Jul 1, 2018
This report compares the profile of the schools accessible to HUD-assisted and LIHTC households in 2016 to the profile of those accessible to other similar households within the same state or metropolitan area. In brief, we find that families receiving all four major types of federal housing assistance lived near lower performing and higher poverty schools than other poor families with children as well as other renters with children.

Authored by: Poverty and Race Research Action Council, NYU Furman Center, and UMass Boston
Topics: Education, Housing, Low-income, Mobility, Racial inequalities, Research, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 18, 2018

Housing and Educational Opportunity: Characteristics of Local Schools Near Families with Federal Housing Assistance

Research
Jul 1, 2018
Poverty and Race Research Action Council, NYU Furman Center, and UMass Boston
This report compares the profile of the schools accessible to HUD-assisted and LIHTC households in 2016 to the profile of those accessible to other similar households within the same state or metropolitan area.
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Sep 17, 2018
The study finds three out of five adults across the U.S. had at least one adverse experience in their childhood, such as divorce, a parent's death, physical or emotional abuse, or a family member's incarceration or substance abuse problem. A quarter of adults have at least three such experiences in childhood, which – according to other research — increases their risk for most common chronic diseases, from heart disease and cancer to depression and substance abuse.

Authored by: Tara Haelle for NPR
Topics: Child welfare, Depression, Early childhood, Low-income, Mental health, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 18, 2018
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Aug 1, 2018
Housing may influence health through various mechanisms and is recognized as a social determinant of health. This study investigated the influence of rental assistance on modifiable health risk factors and behaviors using data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics. Participants receiving rental assistance were compared with participants not receiving rental assistance on body mass index (BMI), obesity, smoking, alcohol use, and physical activity

Authored by:
Topics: Exercise, Health, Housing, Low-income, Metrics, Nutrition, Obesity, Partnerships, Racial inequalities, Research, Smoke-free, Substance abuse
Shared by Housing Is on Aug 1, 2018

Impact of Rental Assistance on Modifiable Health Risk Factors and Behaviors in Adults

Research
Aug 1, 2018
Housing may influence health through various mechanisms and is recognized as a social determinant of health. This study investigated the influence of rental assistance on modifiable health risk factors and behaviors using data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics.
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Aug 1, 2018
Work requirements in public housing are highly controversial, and little is known about their impacts. We examined how implementation of a work requirement paired with supportive services by Charlotte Housing Authority has impacted residents’ overall well-being. Although the policy might improve well-being by increasing household income, it might also engender stress through greater housing precarity.

Authored by:
Topics: Depression, Disabilities, Education, Food insecurity, Health, Housing, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Mental health, Metrics, MTW, Partnerships, Racial inequalities, Research, South, Workforce development
Shared by Housing Is on Aug 1, 2018
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Aug 1, 2018
We examine the implementation of a community health worker (CHW) program in subsidized housing, describe needs identified and priorities set by residents, and summarize participant-reported outcomes.

Authored by:
Topics: East Coast, Health, Housing, Low-income, Mental health, Metrics, Partnerships, Place-based, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Aug 1, 2018