Welcome to Housing Is, a hub for generating effective programs and sharing innovative ideas.

Sign Up or Sign In
 

Elements of a Successful Partnership

With generous support from the MacArthur Foundation, CLPHA developed an in-depth report on regional housing-education collaborations taking place at housing authorities across the Pacific-Northwest.

Read the Multimedia Report
 

National Snapshot of PHA-Health Partnerships

The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) provides new data about public housing authorities’ partnerships with the health sector and offers recommendations to encourage collaboration between these affordable housing providers and their health system partners.

Read the Report
 
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Aug 5, 2019
CLPHA developed a general data sharing template that public housing authorities (PHAs) and their health partners can customize to suit their data sharing and collaboration needs. Please feel free to comment to share any uses/modifications your organization made to implement into a partnership.

Authored by:
Topics: Affordable Care Act, CLPHA, Community development, Cost effectiveness, Data sharing, Dental, Depression, Dual-eligibles, Funding, Health, Healthy homes, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Mental health, Metrics, MTW, Nutrition, Obesity, Partnerships, Place-based, Preventative care, Racial inequalities, Research, SAMHSA, Smoke-free, Stability, Substance abuse, Supportive housing, Sustainability, TA
Shared by Steve Lucas on Aug 5, 2019

CLPHA Data Sharing Template for PHAs and Health Organizations

 

Disclaimer: This template is provided for informational purposes only and not for the purpose of providing legal advice. You should contact your attorney to obtain advice with respect to any particular issue or question. Use of this template, including its exhibits and attachments, does not create a relationship or any responsibilities between CLPHA and the user.

Research
Aug 5, 2019
CLPHA developed a general data sharing template that public housing authorities (PHAs) and their health partners can customize to suit their data sharing and collaboration needs. Please feel free to comment to share any uses/modifications your organization made to implement into a partnership.
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
May 21, 2019
The Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) was first developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in 1990 to assess the health risk behaviors of youth and adults in the United States. For the first time since the survey has been widely administered, the 2017 YRBS optional question list included two questions pertaining to homelessness. SchoolHouse Connection analyzed demographic and risk factor data from the YRBS in 17 states[1], comparing high school students experiencing homelessness and those not experiencing homelessness. This series shares the striking and heartbreaking results of that analysis, with tangible action steps schools can take to promote safety and health for students experiencing homelessness.

Authored by: SchoolHouse Connection
Topics: Education, Homelessness, Low-income, Research, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on May 21, 2019
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Apr 23, 2019
Sweeping changes designed to make the food more nutritious in a federal assistance program for low-income families reduced the risk for obesity for 4-year-olds who had been on the program since birth, according to new research.

Authored by: UCLA Fielding School of Public Health
Topics: Early childhood, Food insecurity, Low-income, Nutrition, Obesity, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 29, 2019

UCLA-Tulane study finds improved WIC food packages reduced children's risk for obesity

Research
Apr 23, 2019
UCLA Fielding School of Public Health
Sweeping changes designed to make the food more nutritious in a federal assistance program for low-income families reduced the risk for obesity for 4-year-olds who had been on the program since birth, according to new research.
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
May 18, 2018
Parent involvement is associated with child academic outcomes, positive behaviors, and social skills. This qualitative study explored school-based parent involvement barriers experienced by nine low-income mothers. In-depth interviews were used to collect data from mothers participating in a community-based program offered in a large public housing neighborhood. Findings included three main barriers: (a) cultural and language differences in their children’s school, (b) undertones of racism from teachers and parents, and (c) being the primary caregiver or sole provider for their children. Although all parents experience challenges to school involvement, low-income mothers face additional obstacles preventing them from engaging in their children’s schools. This perceived lack of school involvement can lead to feelings of helplessness, shame, and stigma.

Authored by: Stephanie Lechuga-Pena and Daniel Brisson for TQR
Topics: Education, Family engagement, Housing, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 25, 2019

Barriers to School-Based Parent Involvement While Living in Public Housing: A Mother's Perspective

Research
May 18, 2018
Stephanie Lechuga-Pena and Daniel Brisson for TQR
Parent involvement is associated with child academic outcomes, positive behaviors, and social skills. This qualitative study explored school-based parent involvement barriers experienced by nine low-income mothers.
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Apr 1, 2019
Serious mental illness (SMI) is a disabling condition that develops early in life and imposes substantial economic burden. There is a growing belief that early intervention for SMI has lifelong benefits for patients. However, assessing the cost-effectiveness of early intervention efforts is hampered by a lack of evidence on the long-term benefits. We addressed this by using a dynamic microsimulation model to estimate the lifetime burden of SMI for those diagnosed by age twenty-five.

Authored by: Health Affairs
Topics: Disabilities, Education, Low-income, Mental health, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 23, 2019

Measuring The Lifetime Costs of Serious Mental Illness And The Mitigating Effects of Educational Attainment

Research
Apr 1, 2019
Health Affairs
Serious mental illness (SMI) is a disabling condition that develops early in life and imposes substantial economic burden. There is a growing belief that early intervention for SMI has lifelong benefits for patients.
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Apr 16, 2019
This report presents a case study of the Chicago Housing Authority’s (CHA’s) work requirement policy, one of a small number of work requirements implemented by housing authorities. The report describes the CHA work requirement, the policy’s implementation and how it has changed, and perceptions of implementation and outcomes from key CHA and service provider staff and residents. The CHA work requirement has been in place for nearly 10 years, allowing us to analyze implementation over time and outcomes.

Authored by: Diane K. Levy, Leiha Edmonds, Samantha Batko, and Marcus Gaddy for The Urban Institute
Topics: Asset building, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Midwest, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 23, 2019
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Nov 27, 2018
A growing body of research suggests that housing eviction is more common than previously recognized and may play an important role in the reproduction of poverty. The proportion of children affected by housing eviction, however, remains largely unknown. We estimate that one in seven children born in large U.S. cities in 1998–2000 experienced at least one eviction for nonpayment of rent or mortgage between birth and age 15. Rates of eviction were substantial across all cities and demographic groups studied, but children from disadvantaged backgrounds were most likely to experience eviction. Among those born into deep poverty, we estimate that approximately one in four were evicted by age 15. Given prior evidence that forced moves have negative consequences for children, we conclude that the high prevalence and social stratification of housing eviction are sufficient to play an important role in the reproduction of poverty and warrant greater policy attention.

Authored by: Ian Lundberg and Louis Donnelly
Topics: Early childhood, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 18, 2019

A Research Note on the Prevalance of Housing Eviction Among Children Born in U.S. Cities

Research
Nov 27, 2018
Ian Lundberg and Louis Donnelly
A growing body of research suggests that housing eviction is more common than previously recognized and may play an important role in the reproduction of poverty. The proportion of children affected by housing eviction, however, remains largely unknown.
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
To what extent is there a mix of incomes within the LIHTC complexes? Is it realistic to expect properties without an explicit mixed-income focus to create and sustain mixed-income communities?

Authored by: Raphael Bostic, Andrew Jakabovics, Richard Voith, and Sean Zielenback
Topics: Housing, Low-income, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 17, 2019

Mixed-Income LIHTC Developments in Chicago: A First Look at Their Income Characteristics and Spillover Impacts

Research
Raphael Bostic, Andrew Jakabovics, Richard Voith, and Sean Zielenback
To what extent is there a mix of incomes within the LIHTC complexes? Is it realistic to expect properties without an explicit mixed-income focus to create and sustain mixed-income communities?
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Jun 18, 2018
The social, economic, and physical environments in which older adults live play a vital role in healthy, active, and engaged lives. But older adults live in unequal environments. Low-income older adults and older racial-ethnic minorities are more likely to live in neighborhoods characterized by poverty, disorder, lack of social cohesion, and pollution. At all income levels there is a greater proportion of older racial-ethnic minorities in neighborhoods with economic, social, and physical problems. Neighborhood inequality may contribute to disparities in the aging experience.

Authored by: Jennifer Ailshire and Catherine Garcia for Generations (also featured by How Housing Matters at The Urban Institute)
Topics: Housing, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Seniors
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 11, 2019

Unequal Places: The Impacts of Socioeconomic and Race/Ethnic Differences in Neighborhoods

Research
Jun 18, 2018
Jennifer Ailshire and Catherine Garcia for Generations (also featured by How Housing Matters at The Urban Institute)
The social, economic, and physical environments in which older adults live play a vital role in healthy, active, and engaged lives. But older adults live in unequal environments.
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Feb 22, 2019
Thoughtfully developed, accessible communities may boost parent engagement and student outcomes in low-income neighborhoods

Authored by: Rachel Sturtz for University of Colorado Denver
Topics: Community development, Education, Family engagement, Housing, Low-income, Partnerships, Racial inequalities, Transportation
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 4, 2019
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Mar 20, 2019
Launched in 2016, the Denver Supportive Housing SIB aims to support residents struggling with homelessness, substance use, and mental health problems by increasing the number of people getting and staying housed and reducing the number of days they spend in jail. The permanent supportive housing model combines a permanent housing subsidy with wraparound services, such as mental health counseling, to help people improve their stability. In Denver, MHCD and the Colorado Coalition for the Homeless (CCH) were selected to offer these services as part of the SIB.

Authored by: The Urban Institute
Topics: Cost effectiveness, Criminal justice, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Pacific Northwest, Partnerships, Research, Substance abuse
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Mar 26, 2019

Starting with Stability: How Denver Is Breaking the Homelessness-Jail Cycle

Research
Mar 20, 2019
The Urban Institute
Launched in 2016, the Denver Supportive Housing SIB aims to support residents struggling with homelessness, substance use, and mental health problems by increasing the number of people getting and staying housed and reducing the number of days they spend in jail.
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Jan 1, 2019
Homelessness during pregnancy poses significant health risks for mothers and infants. As health care providers increase their emphasis on social determinants of health, it is important to understand how unstable housing contributes to complications during pregnancy. We linked data about emergency shelter enrollees with Massachusetts Medicaid claims for the period January 1, 2008–June 30, 2015 to compare health care use and pregnancy complications for 9,124 women who used emergency shelter with those for 8,757 similar women who did not. Rates of mental illness and substance use disorders were significantly higher among homeless women. Adjusted odds of having nine pregnancy complications were also significantly higher for homeless women and remained substantially unchanged after we adjusted for behavioral health disorders.

Authored by: Robin Clark, Linda Weinreb, Julie Flahive, and Robert Seifert for Health Affairs
Topics: Child welfare, Depression, Early childhood, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Mental health, Pre-natal, Research, Substance abuse
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 26, 2019

Homelessness Contributes To Pregnancy Complications

Research
Jan 1, 2019
Robin Clark, Linda Weinreb, Julie Flahive, and Robert Seifert for Health Affairs
Homelessness during pregnancy poses significant health risks for mothers and infants. As health care providers increase their emphasis on social determinants of health, it is important to understand how unstable housing contributes to complications during pregnancy.
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Feb 1, 2019
As of 2015, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) pays for chronic care management (CCM) services for Medicare beneficiaries with two or more chronic conditions. CMS requires eligible providers to first obtain patients’ verbal (and, prior to 2017, written) consent, to ensure that patients who participate in CCM services understand their rights and agree to any applicable cost sharing. CCM providers must also enhance patients’ access to continuous and coordinated care, including ongoing care management.

Authored by: Mathematica Policy Research
Topics: Health, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 18, 2019
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Dec 31, 2018
The Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program is an important, means-tested source of income for the families of children with disabilities. Although some research has shown that SSI improves outcomes for these families, policymakers have been concerned about the program’s growth and the poor outcomes that many former child SSI recipients experience in adulthood. In this brief, we summarize research funded by SSA’s Disability Resource Consortium (DRC) on the program’s recent growth and the factors related to receipt of SSI by children. This research reveals dramatic variation in the rate of child SSI receipt at the state and county level, which is partly due to geographic differences in both the population and the economic circumstances that influence program eligibility.

Authored by: Mathematica Policy Research
Topics: Child welfare, Disabilities, Health, Low-income, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 18, 2019
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Jan 25, 2019
The employment social enterprise (ESE) model can provide an opportunity to create a financially viable business that helps individuals with employment barriers become integrated into the labor force. This research studied eight ESEs. Findings suggest that by applying private‐sector business principles to a workforce development programs, social enterprises can provide participants with meaningful and valuable work experience, while offsetting program costs. Analysis identified four promising practices that social entrepreneurs should adopt when setting up a new enterprise. Enterprises should (a) provide soft‐skill training and social services to participants; (b) operate at a size that allows for economies of scale in production and the provision of support services; (c) have few occupational skill requirements; and (d) hire supervisors with both industry knowledge and the capacity to support individuals with employment barriers.

Authored by: Mathematica Policy Research
Topics: Asset building, Low-income, Research, Workforce development
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 18, 2019

Doing Good While Doing Business Using Financial Viability to Enhance Employability for the Disadvantaged

Research
Jan 25, 2019
Mathematica Policy Research
The employment social enterprise (ESE) model can provide an opportunity to create a financially viable business that helps individuals with employment barriers become integrated into the labor force. This research studied eight ESEs.
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Nov 19, 2018
With persistent concerns about health care expenditures, the health care field has recognized a group of patients known as super utilizers—people with complex health needs and socioeconomic challenges who have very high levels of hospital use. A well-publicized team-based care management model to address the needs of these patients is the hotspotting model pioneered by the Camden Coalition of Healthcare Providers in New Jersey, first brought to national attention by an article in the New Yorker in 2011. So far, interest in programs to help super utilizers has outpaced the available evidence on their effectiveness.

Authored by: Mathematica Policy Research
Topics: Health, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 18, 2019

High-Intensity Care Management Program Shows Promise for Reducing Hospital Use and Spending for Super Utilizers

Research
Nov 19, 2018
Mathematica Policy Research
With persistent concerns about health care expenditures, the health care field has recognized a group of patients known as super utilizers—people with complex health needs and socioeconomic challenges who have very high levels of hospital use.
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Feb 28, 2019
Findings from a national descriptive study of Early Head Start-Child Care Partnerships reveal new information about how partnerships expand access to high quality, affordable care for infants and toddlers. The study describes characteristics of these partnerships, including how they were formed and operated, as well as strategies for implementing partnerships in both center-based child care and family child care homes. It also describes the wide range of services that partnerships offer to children and families who receive care through Early Head Start-Child Care Partnership grant funds. Lessons learned from this study can inform ongoing and future activities of partnerships in early care and education programs as well as training and technical assistance efforts.

Authored by: Del Grosso, Thomas, Makowsky, Levere, Fung, and Paulsell for Department of Health and Human Services
Topics: Child welfare, Early childhood, Low-income, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 15, 2019

Working Together for Children and Families: Findings from the National Descriptive Study of Early Head Start-Child Care Partnerships

Research
Feb 28, 2019
Del Grosso, Thomas, Makowsky, Levere, Fung, and Paulsell for Department of Health and Human Services
Findings from a national descriptive study of Early Head Start-Child Care Partnerships reveal new information about how partnerships expand access to high quality, affordable care for infants and toddlers.
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
The lead article, “Landlords: Critical Participants in the Housing Choice Voucher Program,” provides a basic overview of the HCV program and the role that landlords play in it; examines the implications of voucher acceptance for assisted households; surveys existing research on landlord participation; and provides examples of the types of program and initiatives that HUD, PHAs, and local governments are pursuing to increase voucher acceptance. The Research Spotlight, “HUD-Sponsored Research Sheds New Light on HCV Landlords,” by Meena Bavan and Paul Joice, discusses the findings of two recent HUD-sponsored studies, “A Pilot Study of Landlord Acceptance of Housing Choice Vouchers,” and “Urban Landlords and the Housing Choice Voucher Program: A Research Report.” Finally, the In Practice article, “PHAs Encourage Landlord Participation With Incentives,” discusses initiatives in Marin County, California, and Cambridge, Massachusetts, that offer financial benefits, education, and streamlined administrative processes to encourage landlords to lease to voucher holders.

Authored by: HUD, Office of Policy Development and Research
Topics: Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Mar 12, 2019
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Mar 8, 2019
The number of kids enrolled in Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) — two government health plans for the poor — fell by nearly 600,000 in the first 11 months of 2018, a precipitous drop that has puzzled and alarmed many health policy analysts, while several states say it reflects the good news of an improving economy.

Authored by: Michael Ollove for The Pew Charitable Trusts
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Child welfare, Early childhood, Health, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Research, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 8, 2019

Child Enrollment in Public Health Programs Fell by 600K Last Year

Research
Mar 8, 2019
Michael Ollove for The Pew Charitable Trusts
The number of kids enrolled in Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) — two government health plans for the poor — fell by nearly 600,000 in the first 11 months of 2018, a precipitous drop that has puzzled and alarmed many health policy analysts, while several states say it refl
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Nov 22, 2018
Improved access to health insurance contributed to reducing worry and stress associated with paying rent/mortgage or purchasing meals among low-income people. Expanding health insurance access may have contributed to increasing the disposable income of low income groups.

Authored by: Shiho Kino, Koryu Sato, and Iciro Kawachi for International Journal for Equity in Health
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Health, Housing, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Mental health, Research, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Mar 7, 2019

Spillover benefit of improved access to healthcare on reducing worry about housing and meal affordability

Research
Nov 22, 2018
Shiho Kino, Koryu Sato, and Iciro Kawachi for International Journal for Equity in Health
Improved access to health insurance contributed to reducing worry and stress associated with paying rent/mortgage or purchasing meals among low-income people. Expanding health insurance access may have contributed to increasing the disposable income of low income groups.
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Nov 1, 2018
In this study, researchers conduct a literature review across public health, environmental health, medical, sociology, and urban planning journals to synthesize the research on the mental health effects of rat infestations on residents living in urban neighborhoods.

Authored by: Kaylee Byers, Chelsea G. Himsworth, and Raymond Lam for The Journal of Environmental Health
Topics: Health, Housing, Low-income, Mental health, Research, Safety
Shared by Housing Is on Feb 28, 2019

The Mental Health Consequences of Rat Exposure

Research
Nov 1, 2018
Kaylee Byers, Chelsea G. Himsworth, and Raymond Lam for The Journal of Environmental Health
In this study, researchers conduct a literature review across public health, environmental health, medical, sociology, and urban planning journals to synthesize the research on the mental health effects of rat infestations on residents living in urban neighborhoods.
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Feb 20, 2019
As the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) prioritizes programs to help households receiving rental assistance achieve economic self-sufficiency, researchers, policymakers, and advocates debate the utility of work requirements as an effective pathway toward economic self-sufficiency and the risks of offering rental assistance on a conditional basis. This study contributes additional evidence suggesting that work requirements, when implemented gradually and in context with hardship exemptions and local supports, can boost annual household income, earnings, and the adult-employment ratio* for low-income households with no work history. But work requirements have little effect on those with prior earnings.

Authored by: Han Bum Lee and Paul E. McNamara for Housing Policy Debate (How Housing Matters, Urban Institute)
Topics: Asset building, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Research, Workforce development
Shared by Housing Is on Feb 21, 2019

Exploring the Effects of Work Requirements at a Small Illinois Housing Authority

Research
Feb 20, 2019
Han Bum Lee and Paul E. McNamara for Housing Policy Debate (How Housing Matters, Urban Institute)
As the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) prioritizes programs to help households receiving rental assistance achieve economic self-sufficiency, researchers, policymakers, and advocates debate the utility of work requirements as an effective pathway toward economic self-sufficiency
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
What is source of income discrimination, and who are the Rhode Islanders affected by it? The federal Fair Housing Act prohibits housing discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, familial status, sex, and disability. Rhode Island state law goes further, granting residents additional rights. Yet both still allow landlords to reject a prospective tenant based solely on where his or her income comes from, even when the applicant can lawfully pay the requested rent.

Authored by: SouthCoast Fair Housing
Topics: East Coast, Housing, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Feb 19, 2019
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Feb 5, 2019
Baltimore is the 30th-largest US city by population and is a study in contrasts. It has a low average income compared with other wealthy Northeast cities, has nine colleges and universities, and is a magnet for people pursuing higher education but has undergone decades of population loss. A large social sector provides important services to residents and buoys the local economy: nearly every third job in the city is with a nonprofit employer. But this also illustrates the city’s limited economic vibrancy. This mix of market and nonmarket forces makes Baltimore an important place to examine the geography of opportunity in an American city.

Authored by: The Urban Institute
Topics: Community development, East Coast, Housing, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Feb 14, 2019

"The Black Butterfly:" Racial Segregation and Investment Patterns in Baltimore

Research
Feb 5, 2019
The Urban Institute
Baltimore is the 30th-largest US city by population and is a study in contrasts. It has a low average income compared with other wealthy Northeast cities, has nine colleges and universities, and is a magnet for people pursuing higher education but has undergone decades of population loss.
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Jan 1, 2019
Our aim with this environmental scan was to explore the capacity of public health to advance racial and health equity with community engagement as a central strategy. The partners had to make decisions about whether to be prescriptive in defining core constructs such as health equity and racial equity and whether to explore the public health system broadly or narrow our focus to governmental public health agencies specifically.

Authored by: National Collaborative for Health Equity
Topics: Health, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 31, 2019

Building Public Health Capacity to Advance Equity: A National Environmental Scan of Tribal, State, and Local Governmental Public Health

Research
Jan 1, 2019
National Collaborative for Health Equity
Our aim with this environmental scan was to explore the capacity of public health to advance racial and health equity with community engagement as a central strategy.