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Elements of a Successful Partnership

With generous support from the MacArthur Foundation, CLPHA developed an in-depth report on regional housing-education collaborations taking place at housing authorities across the Pacific-Northwest.

Read the Multimedia Report
 

National Snapshot of PHA-Health Partnerships

The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) provides new data about public housing authorities’ partnerships with the health sector and offers recommendations to encourage collaboration between these affordable housing providers and their health system partners.

Read the Report
 
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Webinar
Community:
Feb 28, 2019
Join us for an examination of how cross-sector data sharing initiatives are being used to tackle tough public health problems. The webinar will provide an in-depth look at a cross-sector collaboration in Illinois between public health, law enforcement, emergency medical services, a fire department and a jail aimed at addressing the needs of high utilizers of behavioral health services.

Authored by: The Network for Public Health Law
Topics: Criminal justice, Data sharing, Health, Mental health, Midwest, Partnerships, Safety, Stability
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 6, 2019
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Publication
Community:
Feb 27, 2019
Over the past two decades, criminal justice reform has focused on evidence-based interventions to prevent arrests and incarceration and to facilitate community reintegration. These initiatives represent a movement toward a less punitive, more holistic approach to public safety, targeting critical social factors that lead to and perpetuate criminal justice involvement. Because housing problems are often a key underlying factor for people’s involvement with the criminal justice system, there are ways housing interventions can help lessen criminal justice involvement. Decriminalizing homelessness, for example, can reduce rates of initial arrest and incarceration, especially for people with low-level, nonviolent offenses. A sufficient supply of affordable housing and supportive services could help people stabilize after their release from jail and reduce the likelihood of recidivism. Policymakers, advocates, and practitioners in housing and criminal justice systems can partner to promote and evaluate housing strategies that divert people from the criminal justice system.

Authored by: Kimberly Burrowes for How Housing Matters (Urban Institute)
Topics: Criminal justice, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Research, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Feb 28, 2019
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Publication
Community:
Dec 14, 2018
Health and reentry are closely related, and chronic medical, mental health, and substance use problems make it harder for newly released people to seek employment, obtain housing, and avoid reincarceration. Compared with the general population, justice-involved people tend to be in poorer health and need access to physical and behavioral health services, as well as the know-how and motivation to get care.

Authored by: Rochisa Shukla and Kamala Mallik-Kane for Urban Institute
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Criminal justice, Health, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Research, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 14, 2018
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Report
Community:
May 1, 2018
The Enhanced Transitional Jobs Demonstration (ETJD), funded by the Employment and Training Administration of the U.S. Department of Labor, tested seven transitional jobs programs that targeted people recently released from prison or low-income parents who had fallen behind in child support payments.

Authored by: MDRC, OPRE, and Employment and Training Demonstration
Topics: Asset building, Cost effectiveness, Criminal justice, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Research, Stability, Workforce development, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 19, 2018
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News Article
Community:
Oct 1, 2018
Some places lift children out of poverty. Others trap them there. Now cities are trying to do something about the difference.

Authored by: Emily Badger and Quoctrung Bui for The New York Times
Topics: Child welfare, CLPHA, Community development, Criminal justice, Housing, Low-income, Metrics, Mobility, Racial inequalities, Research, Stability, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Oct 1, 2018
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Publication
Community:
Jul 27, 2018
On January 1, 2014, in states that have chosen to expand Medicaid eligibility under the Affordable Care Act, nearly all chronically homeless people who lacked health insurance became eligible for Medicaid. This Primer offers state Medicaid officials and other interested parties strategies for using Medicaid to meet the needs of this very vulnerable population--some strategies that have succeeded in the past and some that are emerging under provisions of the Affordable Care Act.

Authored by:
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Criminal justice, Disabilities, Dual-eligibles, Funding, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Mental health, Partnerships, Stability, Substance abuse, Supportive housing
Shared by Housing Is on Jul 27, 2018

A Primer on Using Medicaid for People Experiencing Chronic Homelessness and Tenants in Permanent Supportive Housing

Publication
Jul 27, 2018
On January 1, 2014, in states that have chosen to expand Medicaid eligibility under the Affordable Care Act, nearly all chronically homeless people who lacked health insurance became eligible for Medicaid.
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Policy Brief
Community:
Jul 17, 2018
The Denver Social Impact Bond program is an initiative aimed at measurably improving the lives of people most in need by driving resources towards better, more effective programs. Social Impact Bonds are a unique type of performance-based contract where private and/or philanthropic lenders loan funds to accomplish a specific objective and are repaid based on whether the program achieves its goals. Denver’s Social Impact Bond program will use funds from lenders to provide housing and supportive case management services to at least 250 homeless individuals who frequently use the city’s emergency services, including police, jail, the courts and emergency rooms.

Authored by:
Topics: Community development, Cost effectiveness, Criminal justice, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Mental health, Partnerships, Stability, Substance abuse, West Coast
Shared by Housing Is on Jul 17, 2018
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Report
Community:
Dec 6, 2017
It adds to the growing body of evidence that addressing homelessness saves money elsewhere.

Authored by: J.B. Wogan for Governing the States and Localities
Topics: Cost effectiveness, Criminal justice, Health, Healthy homes, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Place-based, Preventative care, Research, Stability, West Coast
Shared by Housing Is on Jul 5, 2018