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Elements of a Successful Partnership

With generous support from the MacArthur Foundation, CLPHA developed an in-depth report on regional housing-education collaborations taking place at housing authorities across the Pacific-Northwest.

Read the Multimedia Report
 

National Snapshot of PHA-Health Partnerships

The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) provides new data about public housing authorities’ partnerships with the health sector and offers recommendations to encourage collaboration between these affordable housing providers and their health system partners.

Read the Report
 
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Video
Community:
May 20, 2021
Based off of data that Ohio has high rates of infant mortality, housing authorities there are working to address this concern, which disproportionately affects people of color. Under different initiatives, the Akron and Columbus Metropolitan Housing Authorities collaborate with cross-sector partners like mayor’s offices and public health officials to improve outcomes. Panelists will describe their efforts, tactics to reach at-risk families, and ways to fund the work.

Authored by: CLPHA
Topics: Advocacy, Child welfare, Community development, Health, Healthy homes, Legislation & Policy, Pre-natal, Racial inequalities
Shared by Housing Is on May 20, 2021
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Video
Community:
May 18, 2021
In the past couple of years, people and organizations have been more aware of and interested in discussing racial equity. This session will provide a space to step away from tackling this issue due to social pressures and look at how to think about this work from a systems level and go deeper than just surface efforts. Panelists will discuss how to know when initiatives are actually equitable and how can impact be measured, examining work from a racial equity lens, potential leads to impact, as well as measuring both in the short term as well as long-term.

Authored by: CLPHA
Topics: Community development, Metrics, Racial inequalities
Shared by Housing Is on May 18, 2021
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Video
Community:
May 18, 2021
Over the past several years, CLPHA has worked with its members to disseminate information on the best eviction prevention practices and many public housing authorities (PHAs) have made great progress in developing new strategies to keep families housed. The eventual ending of the CDC eviction moratorium provides an opportunity for PHAs to review their eviction prevention strategies. Panelists will review the latest research on COVID-19 and evictions, protecting voucher holders from eviction, and work that PHAs are doing to evaluate their own eviction practices through a racial equity lens.

Authored by: CLPHA
Topics: Community development, COVID-19, Healthy homes, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Racial inequalities
Shared by Housing Is on May 18, 2021

CLPHA HousingIs Summit 2021: Revisiting Eviction Prevention Practices Amid the COVID-19 Pandemic

Video
May 18, 2021
CLPHA
Over the past several years, CLPHA has worked with its members to disseminate information on the best eviction prevention practices and many public housing authorities (PHAs) have made great progress in developing new strategies to keep families housed.
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Video
Community:
May 18, 2021
Keynote: Michael Bennet (D-Co), Congressional Video Message. Plenary: Reducing Childhood Poverty. Following Housing Is' 2019 Summit discussion of reducing childhood poverty and the idea of a university child allowance, this panel will explore the renewed discussion of legislation around a child tax credit and the idea of a universal basic income.

Authored by: CLPHA
Topics: Child welfare, Community development, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on May 18, 2021
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Video
Community:
May 18, 2021
Keynote: Pathways to Postsecondary Success: Unlocking Education Opportunities for Low-Income Adults. Hear about innovations in improving postsecondary outcomes as states commit resources like the State of Michigan’s new program, Michigan Reconnect, which provides free college to residents in MI.

Authored by: CLPHA
Topics: CLPHA, Community development, Education, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Workforce development
Shared by Housing Is on May 18, 2021
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Podcast
Community:
Jan 13, 2021
On a day-to-day basis, vulnerable populations suffer from inequities in health, wealth, and education. These same people are then disproportionately impacted by catastrophes ranging from hurricanes to COVID-19, which only serve to underline the great and urgent need for equity across race, gender, and income. In the latest episode of The Intersect, Madeline Colety and Lorine Giangola discuss how Abt’s housing and resilience work is helping clients promote equity.

Authored by: Madeline Colety & Lorine Giangola for ABT ASSOCIATES
Topics: Advocacy, Community development, Education, Food insecurity, Health, Healthy homes, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Partnerships, Racial inequalities
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 14, 2021
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Podcast
Community:
Nov 23, 2020
“Bending the Arc” explores the everyday work of creating inclusive, equitable and racially just communities. This podcast spotlights bold thinking and action by creative, passionate, experienced thinkers and actors from cities and communities around the US and Canada. In this new episode we talk with Dr. Clinton Boyd, Jr., a Postdoctoral Associate at the Samuel Dubois Cook Center on Social Equity at Duke University. In our conversation we touch on a wide range of topics including our personal journeys as Black fathers, the undervaluing of Black men in general versus the idolizing of Black male athletes and entertainers, and what Clinton has learned from his research, including the Dads2Kids home visiting project. Clinton and Dr. Deirdre Oakley of Georgia State University co-authored an essay for the What Works volume on the role of Black fathers in mixed-income communities.

Authored by: National Initiative on Mixed-Income Communities for CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY
Topics: Advocacy, Community development, Racial inequalities, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 12, 2021

Bending the Arc Podcast: The Connection Between Black Fatherhood and Mixed-Income Communities

Podcast
Nov 23, 2020
National Initiative on Mixed-Income Communities for CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY
“Bending the Arc” explores the everyday work of creating inclusive, equitable and racially just communities. This podcast spotlights bold thinking and action by creative, passionate, experienced thinkers and actors from cities and communities around the US and Canada.
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Research
Community:
Aug 5, 2019
CLPHA developed a general data sharing template that public housing authorities (PHAs) and their health partners can customize to suit their data sharing and collaboration needs. Please feel free to comment to share any uses/modifications your organization made to implement into a partnership.

Authored by:
Topics: Affordable Care Act, CLPHA, Community development, Cost effectiveness, Data sharing, Dental, Depression, Dual-eligibles, Funding, Health, Healthy homes, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Mental health, Metrics, MTW, Nutrition, Obesity, Partnerships, Place-based, Preventative care, Racial inequalities, Research, SAMHSA, Smoke-free, Stability, Substance abuse, Supportive housing, Sustainability, TA
Shared by Steve Lucas on Aug 5, 2019

CLPHA Data Sharing Template for PHAs and Health Organizations

 

Disclaimer: This template is provided for informational purposes only and not for the purpose of providing legal advice. You should contact your attorney to obtain advice with respect to any particular issue or question. Use of this template, including its exhibits and attachments, does not create a relationship or any responsibilities between CLPHA and the user.

Research
Aug 5, 2019
CLPHA developed a general data sharing template that public housing authorities (PHAs) and their health partners can customize to suit their data sharing and collaboration needs. Please feel free to comment to share any uses/modifications your organization made to implement into a partnership.
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News Article
Community:
Jun 4, 2019
A new study finds that higher percentages of wealthy, Asian, and white residents live in HOAs; and people pay a premium of about 4 percent for homes in HOAs.

Authored by: David Montgomery for CityLab
Topics: Community development, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Jun 6, 2019
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Report
Community:
In fact, Syracuse’s experience feels both unique and all too common for U.S. cities, particularly Great Lakes cities: federally sanctioned housing disinvestment; sprawling outward development; stagnating or declining and segregated population; fractured local government and school systems; and outdated infrastructure.

Authored by: Anthony Armstrong & Make Communities for The Poverty and Race Research Action Council (PRRAC)
Topics: Community development, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Housing Is on May 10, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Apr 26, 2019
In the District of Columbia, low-income residents are being pushed out of neighborhoods at some of the highest rates in the country, according to the Institute on Metropolitan Opportunity, which sought to track demographic and economic changes in neighborhoods in the 50 largest U.S. cities from 2000 to 2016.

Authored by: Marissa J. Lang for The Washington Post
Topics: Community development, Housing, Low-income, Racial inequalities
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 26, 2019

Gentrification in D.C. means widespread displacement, bucking national trends, report says

News Article
Apr 26, 2019
Marissa J. Lang for The Washington Post
In the District of Columbia, low-income residents are being pushed out of neighborhoods at some of the highest rates in the country, according to the Institute on Metropolitan Opportunity, which sought to track demographic and economic changes in neighborhoods in the 50 largest U.S.
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Research
Community:
Feb 22, 2019
Thoughtfully developed, accessible communities may boost parent engagement and student outcomes in low-income neighborhoods

Authored by: Rachel Sturtz for University of Colorado Denver
Topics: Community development, Education, Family engagement, Housing, Low-income, Partnerships, Racial inequalities, Transportation
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 4, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Mar 31, 2019
Miami is projected to face anywhere from 1 to 3 feet of sea level rise by 2060, and as sea levels rise, higher ground inland has started to look more and more desirable. Much of that higher ground is in the city's poorest neighborhoods, like Liberty City and Little Haiti. The shifting real estate landscape is just one example of how, in Miami, the effects of global warming are not hypothetical predictions but realities of everyday life, prompting action by government, businesses and individuals alike. Across the region, developers are changing how they build, wealthy homeowners are reinforcing their properties, and in communities that are farther from the coast — places like Liberty City — residents are working to make sure they don't have to leave their homes.

Authored by: Ian Stewart and Lulu Garcia-Navarro for NPR
Topics: Community development, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Racial inequalities, South
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 4, 2019

Building For An Uncertain Future: Miami Residents Adapt To The Changing Climate

News Article
Mar 31, 2019
Ian Stewart and Lulu Garcia-Navarro for NPR
Miami is projected to face anywhere from 1 to 3 feet of sea level rise by 2060, and as sea levels rise, higher ground inland has started to look more and more desirable. Much of that higher ground is in the city's poorest neighborhoods, like Liberty City and Little Haiti.
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Report
Community:
These Principles are derived from a thematic review of mission statements and principles from 35 organizations representing the community development, health, academic, government, finance, and philanthropic sectors. More than 200 respondents provided over 1,800 comments which helped refine the Principles below.

Authored by: Build Healthy Places Network
Topics: Community development, Health, Housing, Partnerships, Racial inequalities
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 11, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Feb 28, 2019
Over the past decade, the real estate fortunes for African Americans have reversed course. Despite a strengthening economy, including record low unemployment and higher wages for black workers, homeownership levels for that group have dropped incrementally almost every year since 2004. It fell to 43 percent in 2017, virtually erasing all of the gains made since the passage of the Fair Housing Act in 1968, landmark legislation outlawing housing discrimination.

Authored by: Troy McMullen for The Washington Post
Topics: Asset building, Community development, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Racial inequalities
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 11, 2019

The 'heartbreaking' decrease in black homeownership

News Article
Feb 28, 2019
Troy McMullen for The Washington Post
Over the past decade, the real estate fortunes for African Americans have reversed course. Despite a strengthening economy, including record low unemployment and higher wages for black workers, homeownership levels for that group have dropped incrementally almost every year since 2004.
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News Article
Community:
Mar 5, 2019
Disasters are becoming more common in America. In the early and mid-20th century, fewer than 20 percent of U.S. counties experienced a disaster each year. Today, it's about 50 percent. According to the 2018 National Climate Assessment, climate change is already driving more severe droughts, floods and wildfires in the U.S. And those disasters are expensive. The federal government spends billions of dollars annually helping communities rebuild and prevent future damage. But an NPR investigation has found that across the country, white Americans and those with more wealth often receive more federal dollars after a disaster than do minorities and those with less wealth. Federal aid isn't necessarily allocated to those who need it most; it's allocated according to cost-benefit calculations meant to minimize taxpayer risk.

Authored by: Rebecca Hersher and Robert Benincasa for NPR
Topics: Community development, Funding, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Research, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Mar 7, 2019
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Interactive
Community:
This decision-support tool enables you to exhibit economic conditions among communities in the Portland-Vancouver region and it provides a data picture of the regional economy to align investments that achieve the coordinated vision of Greater Portland 2020, the 2040 Growth Concept, the Regional Transportation Plan, and Metro’s six desired outcomes, focused on ensuring current and future residents benefit from the region’s sustained economic competitiveness and prosperity.

Authored by: Oregon Metro
Topics: Community development, Low-income, Racial inequalities
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Feb 28, 2019

Economic Values Atlas

Interactive
Oregon Metro
This decision-support tool enables you to exhibit economic conditions among communities in the Portland-Vancouver region and it provides a data picture of the regional economy to align investments that achieve the coordinated vision of Greater Portland 2020, the 2040 Growth Concept, the Regional Tra
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Research
Community:
Feb 5, 2019
Baltimore is the 30th-largest US city by population and is a study in contrasts. It has a low average income compared with other wealthy Northeast cities, has nine colleges and universities, and is a magnet for people pursuing higher education but has undergone decades of population loss. A large social sector provides important services to residents and buoys the local economy: nearly every third job in the city is with a nonprofit employer. But this also illustrates the city’s limited economic vibrancy. This mix of market and nonmarket forces makes Baltimore an important place to examine the geography of opportunity in an American city.

Authored by: The Urban Institute
Topics: Community development, East Coast, Housing, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Feb 14, 2019

"The Black Butterfly:" Racial Segregation and Investment Patterns in Baltimore

Research
Feb 5, 2019
The Urban Institute
Baltimore is the 30th-largest US city by population and is a study in contrasts. It has a low average income compared with other wealthy Northeast cities, has nine colleges and universities, and is a magnet for people pursuing higher education but has undergone decades of population loss.
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Publication
Community:
Jan 30, 2019
To understand more about housing from an epidemiologist’s perspective, we spoke with Earle Chambers, an associate professor in the Department of Family and Social Medicine at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Chambers has documented the connections between housing and neighborhood conditions and health disparities among low-income Latinos in the Bronx.

Authored by: Lisette Vegas and Maya Brennan for How Housing Matters
Topics: Asthma, Community development, Depression, East Coast, Health, Obesity, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 31, 2019

Housing as a Social Determinant of Health: A Q&A with Epidemiologist Earl Chambers

Publication
Jan 30, 2019
Lisette Vegas and Maya Brennan for How Housing Matters
To understand more about housing from an epidemiologist’s perspective, we spoke with Earle Chambers, an associate professor in the Department of Family and Social Medicine at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine.
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Policy Brief
Community:
Jan 30, 2019
NLIHC stands ready to work with all members of Congress to seize the opportunity to address the full scope of affordable housing challenges for families with the greatest needs. In the memorandum below, we provide our recommendations on steps Congress can take—whether through an infrastructure spending package, the appropriations process, housing finance reform, or other legislative avenues—to make the critical investments in the affordable housing our nation needs to help the economy, our communities, children and families thrive.

Authored by: National Low Income Housing Coalition
Topics: Child welfare, Community development, Criminal justice, Funding, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Mobility, Racial inequalities, Safety
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 30, 2019
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Publication
Community:
Jan 24, 2019
Affordable housing campaigns are not new, of course, but what is unprecedented and transformative about Opportunity Starts at Home is the scope and diversity of the partners that are joining forces to advocate for more robust and equitable federal housing policies. The campaign is advised by a Steering Committee including leading national organizations representing a wide range of interests that are working shoulder-to-shoulder to solve the affordable housing crisis.

Authored by: Opportunity Starts at Home
Topics: Asset building, Child welfare, CLPHA, Community development, Early childhood, Education, Food insecurity, Funding, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Immigrants, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Mobility, Out-of-school time, Partnerships, Racial inequalities, Safety, Seniors, Stability, Substance abuse, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 24, 2019

Within Reach: Ambitious Federal Solutions to Meet the Housing Needs of the Most Vulnerable People

Publication
Jan 24, 2019
Opportunity Starts at Home
Affordable housing campaigns are not new, of course, but what is unprecedented and transformative about Opportunity Starts at Home is the scope and diversity of the partners that are joining forces to advocate for more robust and equitable federal housing policies.
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Research
Community:
Aug 19, 2018
On the 50th anniversary of the Fair Housing Act, there is growing discussion and concern about gentrification. In almost every American city, long-time residents feel increasingly anxious that they will be priced out of their homes and communities, as growing numbers of higher-income, college-educated households opt for downtown neighborhoods. Yet when looking through the lens of fair housing, gentrification also offers a glimmer of hope, as the moves that higher-income, white households make into predominantly minority, lower-income neighborhoods are moves that help to integrate those neighborhoods, at least in the near-term. The key question is whether this integration will last and help to deliver on the promise of the Fair Housing Act to promote and further integrated living. Inverting the famous words of community organizer Saul Alinsky, this integration may only be the time between when the first white moves in and the last family of color moves out.

Authored by: Ingrid Gould Ellen and Gerard Torrats-Espinosa for NYU Furman Center
Topics: Community development, Housing, Low-income, Mobility, Racial inequalities, Research, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 19, 2018
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News Article
Community:
Dec 14, 2018
Opportunity zones are home to approximately 35 million Americans. It is estimated that the opportunity-zone designation could attract $100 billion in private investment in these areas, which would go a long way to spurring economic development and creating jobs.

Authored by: Ben Carson for The New York Times
Topics: Community development, Legislation & Policy, Partnerships, Place-based, Racial inequalities, RAD
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 17, 2018

Ben Carson: We won't allow forgotten Americans to be left behind. Here's how.

News Article
Dec 14, 2018
Ben Carson for The New York Times
Opportunity zones are home to approximately 35 million Americans. It is estimated that the opportunity-zone designation could attract $100 billion in private investment in these areas, which would go a long way to spurring economic development and creating jobs.
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News Article
Community:
Dec 6, 2018
Recent research shows that social safety net programs benefit everyone.

Authored by: David L. Kirk for The New York Times
Topics: Asset building, Child welfare, Community development, Food insecurity, Legislation & Policy, Medicaid / Medicare, Racial inequalities, Research, Workforce development
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 6, 2018
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Research
Community:
Dec 5, 2018
How does the quality of where we live affect our children’s development? The impact of housing and neighborhood quality on physical health has long been studied in the public health field, but studies that aim to assess those same impacts on mental health are less common. This study examined the relationship between the physical quality of housing and neighborhoods and their interactive effect on the mental health and motivation of children from elementary school through young adulthood.

Authored by: Journal of Environmental Psychology
Topics: Child welfare, Community development, Housing, Low-income, Mental health, Racial inequalities, Research, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 6, 2018

How Housing and Neighborhood Quality Affect Children's Mental Health

Research
Dec 5, 2018
Journal of Environmental Psychology
How does the quality of where we live affect our children’s development? The impact of housing and neighborhood quality on physical health has long been studied in the public health field, but studies that aim to assess those same impacts on mental health are less common.