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Elements of a Successful Partnership

With generous support from the MacArthur Foundation, CLPHA developed an in-depth report on regional housing-education collaborations taking place at housing authorities across the Pacific-Northwest.

Read the Multimedia Report
 

National Snapshot of PHA-Health Partnerships

The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) provides new data about public housing authorities’ partnerships with the health sector and offers recommendations to encourage collaboration between these affordable housing providers and their health system partners.

Read the Report
 
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Video
Community:
May 18, 2021
After over a year of remote learning, everything is out-of-school time at this point. With unknowns about vaccinations for children, communities should prepare for uneven plans across communities for summer and fall 2021. This discussion session focuses on capacity: how to support virtual and hybrid learning, how to counter learning loss, supporting parent engagement, supporting staff to support parents, providing adult socio-emotional learning, and providing connection to services. Panelists will share examples from on the ground, toolkits, and other resources, while also allowing time for small group discussion to share challenges and troubleshoot solutions.

Authored by: CLPHA
Topics: Attendance, Child welfare, Community development, Early childhood, Education, Grade-level proficiency, Out-of-school time, School-readiness, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on May 18, 2021
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News Article
Community: Youth
Jun 29, 2017
One Summer Chicago Plus is a jobs program designed to reduce violence and prepare youth living in some of the city’s highest-violence neighborhoods for the labor market. This study was carried out over the summer of 2013 in partnership with the Chicago Department of Family and Support Services. It found that the program, which provided a six-week, minimum-wage job for 25 hours a week, reduced the number of violent-crime arrests for participants by 33 percent over the subsequent year. The One Summer Chicago Plus 2013 study—accompanied by a long-term follow-up of the 2012 program—closely examines the two to three years following the six-week program and finds that the reduction in violent-crime arrests is not driven simply by keeping participants off the streets during the summer. In fact, the decline in violence remains significant when the summer is ignored entirely. Researchers did find, however, that the program had no significant impacts on schooling outcomes or engagement, nor did it have a positive impact on formal labor sector employment for all of the participants after the fact. The authors do note that it is possible that significant labor market effects will develop past the three-year window examined in the study.

Authored by: UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO URBAN LABS
Topics: Child welfare, Community development, Criminal justice, Out-of-school time, Partnerships, Preventative care, Safety, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Oct 15, 2020

Chicago jobs program reduces youth violence, Urban Labs study shows

News Article
Jun 29, 2017
UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO URBAN LABS
One Summer Chicago Plus is a jobs program designed to reduce violence and prepare youth living in some of the city’s highest-violence neighborhoods for the labor market. This study was carried out over the summer of 2013 in partnership with the Chicago Department of Family and Support Services.
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Publication
Community:
Jan 24, 2019
Affordable housing campaigns are not new, of course, but what is unprecedented and transformative about Opportunity Starts at Home is the scope and diversity of the partners that are joining forces to advocate for more robust and equitable federal housing policies. The campaign is advised by a Steering Committee including leading national organizations representing a wide range of interests that are working shoulder-to-shoulder to solve the affordable housing crisis.

Authored by: Opportunity Starts at Home
Topics: Asset building, Child welfare, CLPHA, Community development, Early childhood, Education, Food insecurity, Funding, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Immigrants, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Mobility, Out-of-school time, Partnerships, Racial inequalities, Safety, Seniors, Stability, Substance abuse, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 24, 2019

Within Reach: Ambitious Federal Solutions to Meet the Housing Needs of the Most Vulnerable People

Publication
Jan 24, 2019
Opportunity Starts at Home
Affordable housing campaigns are not new, of course, but what is unprecedented and transformative about Opportunity Starts at Home is the scope and diversity of the partners that are joining forces to advocate for more robust and equitable federal housing policies.
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Case study
Community:
Sep 25, 2018
Practitioners working on community safety have increasingly incorporated creative placemaking techniques into their work. Creative placemaking refers to the ways in which arts and culture change how people use the places they share.

Authored by: Mark Treskon for Urban Institute
Topics: Community development, Criminal justice, Low-income, Out-of-school time, Partnerships, Place-based
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Oct 10, 2018
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News Article
Community:
May 25, 2018
Community organizations are improving health equity by tackling the cycle of poverty in urban neighborhoods.

Authored by: Jacqui Cook
Topics: Asthma, Child welfare, Community development, Early childhood, Exercise, Family engagement, Health, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Midwest, Nutrition, Obesity, Out-of-school time, Partnerships, Preventative care, Racial inequalities, Research, Safety, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Jul 11, 2018
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News Article
Community:
Jul 3, 2018
Researchers have shown — and teachers know — that schoolchildren exposed to neighborhood violence can have a tougher time learning, experiencing more stress and depression than their peers growing up in safe neighborhoods. But a Johns Hopkins University sociologist discovered that the consequences of neighborhood violence reach further than previously known, even spilling over to students who come from safe neighborhoods. Using crime and student data from Chicago, Julia Burdick-Will linked exposure to neighborhood violence to a drop in test scores, an effect that extended to students coming from communities that experienced little or no violence.

Authored by: Moriah Balingit for The Washington Post
Topics: Attendance, Child welfare, Community development, Depression, Education, Health, Low-income, Mental health, Midwest, Out-of-school time, Post-secondary, Racial inequalities, Research, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jul 3, 2018

What happens when schoolchildren live in violent neighborhoods? The effects are broader than previously known, a study finds.

News Article
Jul 3, 2018
Moriah Balingit for The Washington Post
Researchers have shown — and teachers know — that schoolchildren exposed to neighborhood violence can have a tougher time learning, experiencing more stress and depression than their peers growing up in safe neighborhoods.
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Report
Community:
Nov 1, 2017
Why do some neighborhoods appear able to launch effective local improvement initiatives, while others are more hampered by fragmentation and mistrust? Why can some communities mobilize diverse constituencies to influence public policy, while others cannot? Answers to these questions may be found in the specific patterns of collaboration that form among community organizations, and between these groups, schools, public agencies, and elected officials, according to MDRC, a preeminent social-policy research organization.

Authored by: MDRC
Topics: Asset building, Child welfare, Community development, Data sharing, Dual-generation, Education, Family engagement, Funding, Health, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Metrics, Midwest, Mobility, Out-of-school time, Partnerships, Place-based, Preventative care, Research, Safety, Stability, Workforce development, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jun 29, 2018

Network Effectiveness in Community Collaborations: Learning from the Chicago Community Networks Study

Report
Nov 1, 2017
MDRC
Why do some neighborhoods appear able to launch effective local improvement initiatives, while others are more hampered by fragmentation and mistrust? Why can some communities mobilize diverse constituencies to influence public policy, while others cannot?
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Video
Community:
May 23, 2018
The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) hosted The Housing Is Summit in Washington, D.C., on May 3-4, 2018 with 300 partners across the housing, education, and healthcare sectors. Access video recordings of the Summit's keynote speakers (HUD Secretary Ben Carson, John Bridgeland, Matthew Morton), plenary panels (on topics that cut across sectors like anchor institutions, data collaboration, stability, and foundation investments), and select breakout sessions focused on the intersections of housing, education, and health.

Authored by: Council of Large Public Housing Authorities
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Attendance, Child welfare, CLPHA, Community development, Data sharing, Dual-eligibles, Dual-generation, Early childhood, Education, Funding, Grade-level proficiency, Health, Healthy homes, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Mental health, Metrics, MTW, Out-of-school time, Partnerships, Place-based, Preventative care, Racial inequalities, Research, School-readiness, Seniors, Stability, Substance abuse, Supportive housing, Sustainability, TA, Workforce development, Youth
Shared by Steve Lucas on May 23, 2018

2018 CLPHA Housing Is Summit - Video Recordings

The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) hosted The Housing Is Summit in Washington, D.C., on May 3-4, 2018 with 200 partners across the housing, education, and healthcare sectors. The Summit highlighted the ways that we can transform systems to better serve low-income people with two days of plenary speakers/panels, breakout sessions, and caucus discussions geared toward intersectional thinking and ways to take action. 

Video
May 23, 2018
Council of Large Public Housing Authorities
The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) hosted The Housing Is Summit in Washington, D.C., on May 3-4, 2018 with 300 partners across the housing, education, and healthcare sectors.