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5th Annual Housing Is Summit on May 16-17

On May 16-17, over 300 practitioners, policymakers, executives, and researchers gathered in Washington, D.C., for CLPHA’s fifth annual Housing Is Summit, an event highlighting collaboration among the housing, education, and health sectors.

View Summit session summaries and video recordings
 

Elements of a Successful Partnership

With generous support from the MacArthur Foundation, CLPHA developed an in-depth report on regional housing-education collaborations taking place at housing authorities across the Pacific-Northwest.

Read the Multimedia Report
 

National Snapshot of PHA-Health Partnerships

The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) provides new data about public housing authorities’ partnerships with the health sector and offers recommendations to encourage collaboration between these affordable housing providers and their health system partners.

Read the Report
 

Housing Is Summit 2019: Keynote Recap

Day Two of this year's Housing Is Summit began with an electrifying keynote by Dr. Camara Jones, a renowned epidemiologist and public health leader, who talked about the role of "social determinants of inequity" as they relate to health disparities and disparities in other key outcomes. 

View summary and video recording of Dr. Jones' keynote.
 
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Research
Community:
Jul 23, 2018
To what extent does a change of address and transformation of the surrounding environment translate into a reduced sense of stigmatization of public housing residents? This article explores this question. Drawing from research at three new, mixed-income developments in Chicago, we examine changes in the regulatory and social environment and the perspectives and experiences of public housing residents living there. We find that although some forms of perceived stigma may have been ameliorated in these new settings, in other ways stigma and isolation has intensified.

Authored by:
Topics: Housing, Low-income, Mental health, Midwest, Mobility, Racial inequalities, Research, Safety
Shared by Housing Is on Jul 23, 2018

The New Stigma of Relocated Public Housing Residents: Challenges to Social Identity in Mixed-Income Developments

Research
Jul 23, 2018
To what extent does a change of address and transformation of the surrounding environment translate into a reduced sense of stigmatization of public housing residents? This article explores this question.
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Report
Community:
Jun 29, 2017
Violent-crime arrests drop by 33 percent for program participants.

Authored by: UChicago News
Topics: Child welfare, Criminal justice, Education, Low-income, Midwest, Mobility, Out-of-school time, Post-secondary, Racial inequalities, Research, Safety, Substance abuse, Workforce development, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Jul 5, 2018
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Report
Community:
Nov 1, 2017
Why do some neighborhoods appear able to launch effective local improvement initiatives, while others are more hampered by fragmentation and mistrust? Why can some communities mobilize diverse constituencies to influence public policy, while others cannot? Answers to these questions may be found in the specific patterns of collaboration that form among community organizations, and between these groups, schools, public agencies, and elected officials, according to MDRC, a preeminent social-policy research organization.

Authored by: MDRC
Topics: Asset building, Child welfare, Community development, Data sharing, Dual-generation, Education, Family engagement, Funding, Health, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Metrics, Midwest, Mobility, Out-of-school time, Partnerships, Place-based, Preventative care, Research, Safety, Stability, Workforce development, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jun 29, 2018

Network Effectiveness in Community Collaborations: Learning from the Chicago Community Networks Study

Report
Nov 1, 2017
MDRC
Why do some neighborhoods appear able to launch effective local improvement initiatives, while others are more hampered by fragmentation and mistrust? Why can some communities mobilize diverse constituencies to influence public policy, while others cannot?