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5th Annual Housing Is Summit on May 16-17

On May 16-17, over 300 practitioners, policymakers, executives, and researchers gathered in Washington, D.C., for CLPHA’s fifth annual Housing Is Summit, an event highlighting collaboration among the housing, education, and health sectors.

View Summit session summaries and video recordings
 

Elements of a Successful Partnership

With generous support from the MacArthur Foundation, CLPHA developed an in-depth report on regional housing-education collaborations taking place at housing authorities across the Pacific-Northwest.

Read the Multimedia Report
 

National Snapshot of PHA-Health Partnerships

The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) provides new data about public housing authorities’ partnerships with the health sector and offers recommendations to encourage collaboration between these affordable housing providers and their health system partners.

Read the Report
 

Housing Is Summit 2019: Keynote Recap

Day Two of this year's Housing Is Summit began with an electrifying keynote by Dr. Camara Jones, a renowned epidemiologist and public health leader, who talked about the role of "social determinants of inequity" as they relate to health disparities and disparities in other key outcomes. 

View summary and video recording of Dr. Jones' keynote.
 
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News Article
Community:
Jan 8, 2019
SNAP is the first line of defense against senior hunger and frees up funds for health care and housing. This is important because one way struggling seniors often meet rising health care and other costs is by cutting back on or skipping meals — coping strategies that can exacerbate existing health problems. SNAP improves the health and well-being of seniors by reducing the negative health impacts of food insecurity, including diabetes, hypertension and depression.

Authored by: Joey Hentzler for The Topeka Capital-Journal
Topics: Depression, Disabilities, Food insecurity, Health, Housing, Low-income, Mental health, Midwest, Nutrition, Seniors
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 16, 2019
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Research
Community:
Jul 23, 2018
To what extent does a change of address and transformation of the surrounding environment translate into a reduced sense of stigmatization of public housing residents? This article explores this question. Drawing from research at three new, mixed-income developments in Chicago, we examine changes in the regulatory and social environment and the perspectives and experiences of public housing residents living there. We find that although some forms of perceived stigma may have been ameliorated in these new settings, in other ways stigma and isolation has intensified.

Authored by:
Topics: Housing, Low-income, Mental health, Midwest, Mobility, Racial inequalities, Research, Safety
Shared by Housing Is on Jul 23, 2018

The New Stigma of Relocated Public Housing Residents: Challenges to Social Identity in Mixed-Income Developments

Research
Jul 23, 2018
To what extent does a change of address and transformation of the surrounding environment translate into a reduced sense of stigmatization of public housing residents? This article explores this question.
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News Article
Community:
Jul 3, 2018
Researchers have shown — and teachers know — that schoolchildren exposed to neighborhood violence can have a tougher time learning, experiencing more stress and depression than their peers growing up in safe neighborhoods. But a Johns Hopkins University sociologist discovered that the consequences of neighborhood violence reach further than previously known, even spilling over to students who come from safe neighborhoods. Using crime and student data from Chicago, Julia Burdick-Will linked exposure to neighborhood violence to a drop in test scores, an effect that extended to students coming from communities that experienced little or no violence.

Authored by: Moriah Balingit for The Washington Post
Topics: Attendance, Child welfare, Community development, Depression, Education, Health, Low-income, Mental health, Midwest, Out-of-school time, Post-secondary, Racial inequalities, Research, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jul 3, 2018

What happens when schoolchildren live in violent neighborhoods? The effects are broader than previously known, a study finds.

News Article
Jul 3, 2018
Moriah Balingit for The Washington Post
Researchers have shown — and teachers know — that schoolchildren exposed to neighborhood violence can have a tougher time learning, experiencing more stress and depression than their peers growing up in safe neighborhoods.