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5th Annual Housing Is Summit on May 16-17

On May 16-17, over 300 practitioners, policymakers, executives, and researchers gathered in Washington, D.C., for CLPHA’s fifth annual Housing Is Summit, an event highlighting collaboration among the housing, education, and health sectors.

View Summit session summaries and video recordings
 

Elements of a Successful Partnership

With generous support from the MacArthur Foundation, CLPHA developed an in-depth report on regional housing-education collaborations taking place at housing authorities across the Pacific-Northwest.

Read the Multimedia Report
 

National Snapshot of PHA-Health Partnerships

The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) provides new data about public housing authorities’ partnerships with the health sector and offers recommendations to encourage collaboration between these affordable housing providers and their health system partners.

Read the Report
 

Housing Is Summit 2019: Keynote Recap

Day Two of this year's Housing Is Summit began with an electrifying keynote by Dr. Camara Jones, a renowned epidemiologist and public health leader, who talked about the role of "social determinants of inequity" as they relate to health disparities and disparities in other key outcomes. 

View summary and video recording of Dr. Jones' keynote.
 
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Report
Community:
In 2017, the Bipartisan Policy Center and the Center for Outcomes Research and Education (CORE) spoke with over 90 national thought leaders and stakeholders about the current state of rural health care in the Upper Midwest region, including Iowa, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wyoming. BPC and CORE used these discussions to determine the real-world implications of existing federal policies, to understand ongoing care challenges, and to identify opportunities for improvement in rural health care access and delivery.

Authored by: Bipartisan Policy Center
Topics: Health, Low-income, Midwest, Research, Seniors
Shared by Housing Is on Jun 12, 2019

Reinventing Rural Health Care: A Case Study of Seven Upper Midwest States

Report
Bipartisan Policy Center
In 2017, the Bipartisan Policy Center and the Center for Outcomes Research and Education (CORE) spoke with over 90 national thought leaders and stakeholders about the current state of rural health care in the Upper Midwest region, including Iowa, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dak
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News Article
Community:
Jan 6, 2019
These programs, available at 10 Wichita middle and high schools so far, include extended serving times in cafeterias, grab-and-go breakfasts from carts or kiosks, and “second-chance breakfast,” in which students are offered breakfast after homeroom or first period.

Authored by: Suzanne Perez Tobias for The Wichita Eagle
Topics: Child welfare, Education, Food insecurity, Health, Low-income, Midwest, Nutrition, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 16, 2019

Lots of kids start the school day hungry. Here's how Wichita is trying to help

News Article
Jan 6, 2019
Suzanne Perez Tobias for The Wichita Eagle
These programs, available at 10 Wichita middle and high schools so far, include extended serving times in cafeterias, grab-and-go breakfasts from carts or kiosks, and “second-chance breakfast,” in which students are offered breakfast after homeroom or first period.
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News Article
Community:
Jan 8, 2019
SNAP is the first line of defense against senior hunger and frees up funds for health care and housing. This is important because one way struggling seniors often meet rising health care and other costs is by cutting back on or skipping meals — coping strategies that can exacerbate existing health problems. SNAP improves the health and well-being of seniors by reducing the negative health impacts of food insecurity, including diabetes, hypertension and depression.

Authored by: Joey Hentzler for The Topeka Capital-Journal
Topics: Depression, Disabilities, Food insecurity, Health, Housing, Low-income, Mental health, Midwest, Nutrition, Seniors
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 16, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Oct 9, 2018
Sweet Water Foundation transformed four blocks in Englewood to cultivate community and help build skills, resources, and opportunities for residents.

Authored by: MacArthur Foundation
Topics: Community development, Family engagement, Food insecurity, Green, Health, Low-income, Midwest, Nutrition, Partnerships, Place-based, Sustainability, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Oct 24, 2018
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News Article
Community:
Sep 22, 2018
For the Omaha refugee families removed from an apartment complex where city inspectors found gas leaks, vermin and other code violations, there were glimmers of progress Friday amid the uncertainty.

Authored by: Erin Duffy for the Omaha World Herald
Topics: Health, Housing, Immigrants, Low-income, Midwest, Safety
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 27, 2018

500 refugees evacuated from Omaha apartments could be in new housing or hotel rooms next week

News Article
Sep 22, 2018
Erin Duffy for the Omaha World Herald
For the Omaha refugee families removed from an apartment complex where city inspectors found gas leaks, vermin and other code violations, there were glimmers of progress Friday amid the uncertainty.
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News Article
Community:
Sep 21, 2018
A children’s hospital in Columbus, Ohio, is trying to treat a difficult patient: Its own struggling neighborhood.

Authored by: Laura Bliss for CityLab
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Child welfare, Health, Housing, Low-income, Midwest, Partnerships
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 25, 2018
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News Article
Community:
Jul 9, 2018
Neighborhood may matter more than race in breast cancer survival rates

Authored by: Darcel Rockett for THE CHICAGO TRIBUNE
Topics: Health, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Midwest, Racial inequalities
Shared by Abra Lyons-Warren on Jul 12, 2018
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News Article
Community:
May 25, 2018
Community organizations are improving health equity by tackling the cycle of poverty in urban neighborhoods.

Authored by: Jacqui Cook
Topics: Asthma, Child welfare, Community development, Early childhood, Exercise, Family engagement, Health, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Midwest, Nutrition, Obesity, Out-of-school time, Partnerships, Preventative care, Racial inequalities, Research, Safety, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Jul 11, 2018
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News Article
Community:
Jul 3, 2018
Researchers have shown — and teachers know — that schoolchildren exposed to neighborhood violence can have a tougher time learning, experiencing more stress and depression than their peers growing up in safe neighborhoods. But a Johns Hopkins University sociologist discovered that the consequences of neighborhood violence reach further than previously known, even spilling over to students who come from safe neighborhoods. Using crime and student data from Chicago, Julia Burdick-Will linked exposure to neighborhood violence to a drop in test scores, an effect that extended to students coming from communities that experienced little or no violence.

Authored by: Moriah Balingit for The Washington Post
Topics: Attendance, Child welfare, Community development, Depression, Education, Health, Low-income, Mental health, Midwest, Out-of-school time, Post-secondary, Racial inequalities, Research, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jul 3, 2018

What happens when schoolchildren live in violent neighborhoods? The effects are broader than previously known, a study finds.

News Article
Jul 3, 2018
Moriah Balingit for The Washington Post
Researchers have shown — and teachers know — that schoolchildren exposed to neighborhood violence can have a tougher time learning, experiencing more stress and depression than their peers growing up in safe neighborhoods.
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Report
Community:
Nov 1, 2017
Why do some neighborhoods appear able to launch effective local improvement initiatives, while others are more hampered by fragmentation and mistrust? Why can some communities mobilize diverse constituencies to influence public policy, while others cannot? Answers to these questions may be found in the specific patterns of collaboration that form among community organizations, and between these groups, schools, public agencies, and elected officials, according to MDRC, a preeminent social-policy research organization.

Authored by: MDRC
Topics: Asset building, Child welfare, Community development, Data sharing, Dual-generation, Education, Family engagement, Funding, Health, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Metrics, Midwest, Mobility, Out-of-school time, Partnerships, Place-based, Preventative care, Research, Safety, Stability, Workforce development, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jun 29, 2018

Network Effectiveness in Community Collaborations: Learning from the Chicago Community Networks Study

Report
Nov 1, 2017
MDRC
Why do some neighborhoods appear able to launch effective local improvement initiatives, while others are more hampered by fragmentation and mistrust? Why can some communities mobilize diverse constituencies to influence public policy, while others cannot?
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Video
Community:
Jul 19, 2017

Authored by: CLPHA
Topics: CLPHA, Education, Health, Housing, Low-income, Midwest, Partnerships
Shared by CLPHA Admin on Jul 19, 2017

VIDEO: Leadership Spotlight: State & Regional Initiatives (CLPHA's 2017 Affordable Housing & Education Summit)

Recorded at CLPHA's 2017 Affordable Housing & Education Summit on July 12, 2017.

This panel provides examples of how states can and have helped efforts to align systems in order to improve life outcomes for low-income residents.

Video
Jul 19, 2017
CLPHA