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Elements of a Successful Partnership

With generous support from the MacArthur Foundation, CLPHA developed an in-depth report on regional housing-education collaborations taking place at housing authorities across the Pacific-Northwest.

Read the Multimedia Report
 

National Snapshot of PHA-Health Partnerships

The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) provides new data about public housing authorities’ partnerships with the health sector and offers recommendations to encourage collaboration between these affordable housing providers and their health system partners.

Read the Report
 
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Report
Community:
Jun 27, 2022
We have an abundance of talent that is ready to reimagine early childhood and well-being in America for our youngest children and families, but we do not have an abundance of leadership experiences that nurture, propel, and position them as the dynamic leaders our country urgently needs. Leadership that reflects the full diversity and genius of our communities, sectors, identities, and lived experiences matters now more than ever. In Toward A More Equitable Tomorrow: A Landscape Analysis of Early Childhood Leadership, we uncover the essentials for future leadership investments that value and center equity—especially racial equity and inclusion—to surface new possibilities and equitable prosperity moving forward. Insights from stakeholders including state and federal cabinet directors, service providers, funders, and parents offer powerful perspectives to guide the future early childhood field, and guide those who seek to accelerate families’ well-being, educational success, and economic mobility. Ascend at the Aspen Institute is embracing this moment as a renewal, and also as a redoubling of our commitment to remake our systems and our society. This means centering children and families with a focus not simply on eliminating persistent inequities such as poverty, polarization, and racism, but on ensuring pathways to prosperity and well-being. With support from the Buffett Early Childhood Fund, David and Lucile Packard Foundation, and the Bezos Family Foundation, Ascend undertook a robust landscape analysis of the early childhood field. More than 80 leaders—from research, practice, policy, philanthropy, and families with young children—shared their insights for this report. It was augmented by a review of 20 mission-aligned leadership efforts. Our inquiry was grounded in an intentional focus on racial, economic, and gender equity; respect for the advances made; commitment to innovation; and an open mind to new approaches, possibilities, and power.

Authored by: Ascend at the Aspen Institute
Topics: Advocacy, Asset building, Child welfare, CLPHA, Early childhood, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Racial inequalities, Research, Supportive housing, Sustainability, Youth
Shared by Karina George on Jun 27, 2022

Toward a More Equitable Tomorrow: A Landscape Analysis of Early Childhood Leadership

Report
Jun 27, 2022
Ascend at the Aspen Institute
We have an abundance of talent that is ready to reimagine early childhood and well-being in America for our youngest children and families, but we do not have an abundance of leadership experiences that nurture, propel, and position them as the dynamic leaders our country urgently needs.
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Video
Community:
Jun 17, 2022
This panel discussion will examine the results of efforts to significantly expand the reach of HUD’s Family Self-Sufficiency Program through partnerships between the nonprofit Compass Working Capital and the Boston and Cambridge Housing Authorities. Panelists will discuss their program model and its evaluation, how they have scaled up FSS, what results they have experienced to date, and where they plan to go from here. An FSS program participant will participate in the panel and share their perspective on how the program has benefitted them.

Authored by:
Topics: Advocacy, Asset building, CLPHA, Early childhood, Education, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Research, Supportive housing
Shared by Karina George on Jun 17, 2022

CLPHA Housing Is Summit 2022: Taking FSS to Scale - Lessons from Compass' Partnerships in Boston and Cambridge

Video
Jun 17, 2022
This panel discussion will examine the results of efforts to significantly expand the reach of HUD’s Family Self-Sufficiency Program through partnerships between the nonprofit Compass Working Capital and the Boston and Cambridge Housing Authorities.
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Report
Community:
Apr 11, 2022
Educators play an important role in supporting students' mental well-being. The pandemic has added incredible layers of stress for both adults and young people. Although educators can't control all the stressors and sources of trauma affecting them, they can foster healing and wellness in their classroom or program and work to remove the stigma around mental health concerns.

Authored by: First Book Research & Insights
Topics: Advocacy, Depression, Early childhood, Education, Health, Healthy homes, Literacy, Low-income, Mental health, Racial inequalities, Research, School-readiness, Youth
Shared by Stephanie Gray on Apr 11, 2022
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Report
Community:
Nov 7, 2019
How Housing Programs Can Support the Educational Needs of Children Living in Publicly Supported Homes

Authored by: Public and Affordable Housing Research Corporation
Topics: Attendance, Broadband, Child welfare, Early childhood, Health, Housing, Literacy, Low-income, Out-of-school time, Partnerships, Place-based, Research, School-readiness
Shared by Kelly McElwain on Nov 7, 2019
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Report
Community:
Apr 25, 2019
Access to affordable child care can be a major barrier for low-income parents who want to participate in education and training activities to gain skills or obtain employment. Child care assistance from the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF), the federal block grant that funds states to provide child care assistance to low-income families, can help alleviate this barrier and make it easier for low-income parents to participate in activities that improve their skills and lead to stable employment with adequate pay. However, the CCDF eligibility requirements and priorities for service are set at the state level, and states make different decisions about how to allocate scarce CCDF resources, so access to and use of CCDF subsidies for parents seeking education and training varies across states.

Authored by: Semhar Gebrekristos and Gina Adams for The Urban Institute
Topics: Child welfare, Early childhood, Education, Legislation & Policy, Post-secondary, Research, Workforce development
Shared by Housing Is on May 30, 2019
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Report
Community:
May 1, 2019
Child poverty is an urgent and preventable crisis. Solutions to child poverty already exist if we just expand and invest in them. Benefits like nutrition assistance, housing vouchers and tax credits helped lift nearly 7 million children out of poverty in 2017, but millions of children were left behind due to inadequate funding, eligibility restrictions and low wages. We can and must fix these problems to help more children escape poverty now.

Authored by: Children's Defense Fund
Topics: Child welfare, Dual-generation, Early childhood, Food insecurity, Funding, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Research, Workforce development
Shared by Housing Is on May 28, 2019
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Research
Community:
Early childhood education programs can impact life outcomes in ways that span generations, according to new research from Nobel laureate James Heckman. In a pair of companion papers released this week, the pioneering University of Chicago economist found that the children of those who participated in a landmark 1960s study still saw improvements in education, health and employment. The children saw such benefits without participating in the same preschool program as their parents—suggesting that early education can contribute to lasting upward mobility and help break cycles of poverty

Authored by: Professor James Heckman and Ganesh Karapakula
Topics: Child welfare, Dual-generation, Early childhood, Family engagement, Research
Shared by Housing Is on May 21, 2019
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Video
Community:
May 9, 2019
On May 9, the Brookings Institution hosted an event to discuss the subsequent report, “A Roadmap to Reducing Child Poverty.” The event featured comments from Greg Duncan, who served as Chair of the Committee on Building an Agenda to Reduce the Number of Children in Poverty by Half in 10 Years, as well as a panel discussion on the report, its recommendations, and barriers to implementation. A second panel highlighted national and state policy perspectives of the consensus study report.

Authored by: The Brookings Institution
Topics: Early childhood, Funding, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Research, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on May 13, 2019
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Research
Community:
Apr 29, 2019
When following the mother–child pair from pregnancy through five years postpartum, the estimated cost is $14.2 billion for births in 2017, or an average of $32,000 for every mother–child pair affected but not treated.

Authored by: Mathematica
Topics: Dual-generation, Early childhood, Mental health, Pre-natal, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 30, 2019
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Research
Community:
Apr 23, 2019
Sweeping changes designed to make the food more nutritious in a federal assistance program for low-income families reduced the risk for obesity for 4-year-olds who had been on the program since birth, according to new research.

Authored by: UCLA Fielding School of Public Health
Topics: Early childhood, Food insecurity, Low-income, Nutrition, Obesity, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 29, 2019

UCLA-Tulane study finds improved WIC food packages reduced children's risk for obesity

Research
Apr 23, 2019
UCLA Fielding School of Public Health
Sweeping changes designed to make the food more nutritious in a federal assistance program for low-income families reduced the risk for obesity for 4-year-olds who had been on the program since birth, according to new research.
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Research
Community:
Nov 27, 2018
A growing body of research suggests that housing eviction is more common than previously recognized and may play an important role in the reproduction of poverty. The proportion of children affected by housing eviction, however, remains largely unknown. We estimate that one in seven children born in large U.S. cities in 1998–2000 experienced at least one eviction for nonpayment of rent or mortgage between birth and age 15. Rates of eviction were substantial across all cities and demographic groups studied, but children from disadvantaged backgrounds were most likely to experience eviction. Among those born into deep poverty, we estimate that approximately one in four were evicted by age 15. Given prior evidence that forced moves have negative consequences for children, we conclude that the high prevalence and social stratification of housing eviction are sufficient to play an important role in the reproduction of poverty and warrant greater policy attention.

Authored by: Ian Lundberg and Louis Donnelly
Topics: Early childhood, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 18, 2019

A Research Note on the Prevalance of Housing Eviction Among Children Born in U.S. Cities

Research
Nov 27, 2018
Ian Lundberg and Louis Donnelly
A growing body of research suggests that housing eviction is more common than previously recognized and may play an important role in the reproduction of poverty. The proportion of children affected by housing eviction, however, remains largely unknown.
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Report
Community:
Apr 1, 2019
Investments in the postsecondary success of parents with young children can increase attainment of credentials leading to good jobs, bring children the benefits of high-quality learning environments, promote later college-going among children, and improve family economic security across generations. This factsheet provides figures on the student parent population based on the latest National Postsecondary Student Aid Study data.

Authored by: Ascend: The Aspen Institute
Topics: Dual-generation, Early childhood, Post-secondary, Research, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 11, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Apr 10, 2019
Senate Democrats, led by Sherrod Brown (OH), Michael Bennet (CO), Dick Durbin (IL), and Ron Wyden (OR), has introduced a new bill that would establish a child allowance for the first time in American history and substantially increase the size of the Earned Income Tax Credit for low-income people.

Authored by: Dylan Matthews for Vox
Topics: Early childhood, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 10, 2019

Senate Democrats have coalesced around a big plan to expand tax credits

News Article
Apr 10, 2019
Dylan Matthews for Vox
Senate Democrats, led by Sherrod Brown (OH), Michael Bennet (CO), Dick Durbin (IL), and Ron Wyden (OR), has introduced a new bill that would establish a child allowance for the first time in American history and substantially increase the size of the Earned Income Tax Credit for low-income people.
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Publication
Community:
Managing director of Ascend at the Aspen Institute discusses the role of women in public health policy-making

Authored by: Ascend: The Aspen Institute
Topics: Dual-generation, Early childhood, Family engagement, Mental health, Pre-natal, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 2, 2019
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Interactive
Community:
Resources from Ascend at The Aspen Institute

Authored by: Ascend: The Aspen Institute
Topics: Asset building, Child welfare, Dual-generation, Early childhood, Family engagement, Research, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 2, 2019
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Publication
Community:
Mar 1, 2019
Released bi-monthly, each issue of the ZERO TO THREE Journal focuses on a critical topic within the early childhood development field. Journal articles are carefully composed to present current knowledge, latest research, and practical advice to help early childhood professionals do their best work in support of infants and toddlers.

Authored by: Zero To Three
Topics: Child welfare, Dual-generation, Early childhood, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Research, Safety
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Mar 26, 2019
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Research
Community:
Jan 1, 2019
Homelessness during pregnancy poses significant health risks for mothers and infants. As health care providers increase their emphasis on social determinants of health, it is important to understand how unstable housing contributes to complications during pregnancy. We linked data about emergency shelter enrollees with Massachusetts Medicaid claims for the period January 1, 2008–June 30, 2015 to compare health care use and pregnancy complications for 9,124 women who used emergency shelter with those for 8,757 similar women who did not. Rates of mental illness and substance use disorders were significantly higher among homeless women. Adjusted odds of having nine pregnancy complications were also significantly higher for homeless women and remained substantially unchanged after we adjusted for behavioral health disorders.

Authored by: Robin Clark, Linda Weinreb, Julie Flahive, and Robert Seifert for Health Affairs
Topics: Child welfare, Depression, Early childhood, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Mental health, Pre-natal, Research, Substance abuse
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 26, 2019

Homelessness Contributes To Pregnancy Complications

Research
Jan 1, 2019
Robin Clark, Linda Weinreb, Julie Flahive, and Robert Seifert for Health Affairs
Homelessness during pregnancy poses significant health risks for mothers and infants. As health care providers increase their emphasis on social determinants of health, it is important to understand how unstable housing contributes to complications during pregnancy.
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Research
Community:
Feb 28, 2019
Findings from a national descriptive study of Early Head Start-Child Care Partnerships reveal new information about how partnerships expand access to high quality, affordable care for infants and toddlers. The study describes characteristics of these partnerships, including how they were formed and operated, as well as strategies for implementing partnerships in both center-based child care and family child care homes. It also describes the wide range of services that partnerships offer to children and families who receive care through Early Head Start-Child Care Partnership grant funds. Lessons learned from this study can inform ongoing and future activities of partnerships in early care and education programs as well as training and technical assistance efforts.

Authored by: Del Grosso, Thomas, Makowsky, Levere, Fung, and Paulsell for Department of Health and Human Services
Topics: Child welfare, Early childhood, Low-income, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 15, 2019

Working Together for Children and Families: Findings from the National Descriptive Study of Early Head Start-Child Care Partnerships

Research
Feb 28, 2019
Del Grosso, Thomas, Makowsky, Levere, Fung, and Paulsell for Department of Health and Human Services
Findings from a national descriptive study of Early Head Start-Child Care Partnerships reveal new information about how partnerships expand access to high quality, affordable care for infants and toddlers.
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News Article
Community:
Mar 7, 2019
Democrats this week announced new legislation that would slash child poverty by paying low-income parents the kind of monthly allowance that is standard in other developed countries. But the lawmakers who introduced the bill, called the American Family Act, didn’t use the terms “child benefit” or “child allowance” at their Capitol Hill press conference Wednesday. Instead, they all called it a tax credit or a tax cut.

Authored by: Arthur Delaney for HuffPost
Topics: Child welfare, Dual-generation, Early childhood, Funding, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 12, 2019
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Research
Community:
Mar 8, 2019
The number of kids enrolled in Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) — two government health plans for the poor — fell by nearly 600,000 in the first 11 months of 2018, a precipitous drop that has puzzled and alarmed many health policy analysts, while several states say it reflects the good news of an improving economy.

Authored by: Michael Ollove for The Pew Charitable Trusts
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Child welfare, Early childhood, Health, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Research, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 8, 2019

Child Enrollment in Public Health Programs Fell by 600K Last Year

Research
Mar 8, 2019
Michael Ollove for The Pew Charitable Trusts
The number of kids enrolled in Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) — two government health plans for the poor — fell by nearly 600,000 in the first 11 months of 2018, a precipitous drop that has puzzled and alarmed many health policy analysts, while several states say it refl
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Publication
Community:
Jan 31, 2019
For many years, the vulnerabilities of children experiencing homelessness have been glossed over on the assumption that their innate resilience would overcome the impact of homelessness. As someone who worked in the field, I would often hear, “Oh, they’ll never remember.” Today we know better. We know more about how the brain develops and about how trauma impacts brain development. There is a growing recognition among providers that these early years are critical for establishing a foundation for emotional, mental, and physical wellbeing, and that we don’t get a second chance at early childhood.

Authored by: Carol Klocek for SchoolHouse Connection
Topics: Early childhood, Education, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Research, Safety, Stability
Shared by Housing Is on Feb 21, 2019

Real Families, Real Solutions: How Homeless Service Providers Can Meet the Needs of Young Children and Their Families

Publication
Jan 31, 2019
Carol Klocek for SchoolHouse Connection
For many years, the vulnerabilities of children experiencing homelessness have been glossed over on the assumption that their innate resilience would overcome the impact of homelessness. As someone who worked in the field, I would often hear, “Oh, they’ll never remember.” Today we know better.
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Report
Community:
Feb 1, 2019
In the summer of 2018, Ascend gathered more than two dozen state and national policy experts and other leaders in the fields of health and early learning at its Aspen Meadows Campus in Aspen, Colorado, to discuss the growing opportunity to leverage the 2Gen approach at the state level and determine how best to take promising new innovations to scale. This report offers a snapshot of specific things federal, state, and local leaders can keep doing, start doing, or stop doing to remove barriers and accelerate success.

Authored by: Ascend: The Aspen Institute
Topics: Dual-generation, Early childhood, Family engagement, Legislation & Policy, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Feb 15, 2019

Aligning and Streamlining Systems to Secure Better Outcomes for Families

Report
Feb 1, 2019
Ascend: The Aspen Institute
In the summer of 2018, Ascend gathered more than two dozen state and national policy experts and other leaders in the fields of health and early learning at its Aspen Meadows Campus in Aspen, Colorado, to discuss the growing opportunity to leverage the 2Gen approach at the state level and determine
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Publication
Community:
Jan 1, 2019
A healthy birth and positive experiences in early childhood can promote health and development. One approach that has improved outcomes for children and their parents is home visiting, which provides individually tailored support, resources, and information to expectant parents and families with young children. This brief summarizes recently published reports from two national studies of evidence-based early childhood home visiting: the Mother and Infant Home Visiting Program Evaluation (MIHOPE) and MIHOPE-Strong Start.

Authored by: MDRC
Topics: Child welfare, Dual-generation, Early childhood, Home visiting, Metrics, Partnerships, Place-based, Preventative care, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 31, 2019
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Research
Community:
Mar 14, 2017
This brief examines the well-being of young children 20 months after staying in emergency homeless shelters with their families.

Authored by: Office of the Administration for Children & Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Topics: Early childhood, Homelessness, Housing, Literacy, Low-income, Research, School-readiness
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 29, 2019
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Report
Community:
Dec 1, 2018
This 2018 report updates the annual Early Childhood Homelessness State Profiles and provides a snapshot of early childhood data available for children who are experiencing homelessness in each state, plus the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. It includes publicly available data for 2015—2016 from the U.S. Census Bureau (Census), U.S. Department of Education (ED), U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), and the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

Authored by: U.S. Department of Education
Topics: Early childhood, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 8, 2019