Resources

 

Welcome to Resources! Explore research, policy, news, and other resources related to housing, education, and health, as well as share your own content. Use the commenting feature to interact and collaborate with other users.

 
Found 52 resources.
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Publication Jun 11, 2019
Authored by Civic and the Everyone Graduates Center at the Johns Hopkins University School of Education, and released annually in partnership with the Alliance for Excellent Education and America’s Promise Alliance, the Building a Grad Nation report examines both progress and challenges toward reaching the GradNation campaign goal of a national on-time graduation rate of 90 percent.

Authored by: Civic and the Everyone Graduates Center at Johns Hopkins University School of Education
Topics: Education, Low-income, Research, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Jun 11, 2019
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This paper analyzes why SNAP benefits are inadequate, reviews the body of research showing positive effects from more adequate SNAP benefits, and offers key policy solutions to improve benefit adequacy.

Authored by: Food Research & Action Center (FRAC)
Topics: Food insecurity, Health, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Nutrition, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Jun 11, 2019
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Publication May 1, 2019
Focusing on traditional neighborhood measures such as disadvantage and segregation rarely reveals how specific policies, powerful decisionmakers, and institutions built on racial hierarchy generate and maintain racial health disparities. To help researchers, policymakers, and practitioners consider how best to recognize and incorporate structural racism in the study of place-based health disparities, this literature review highlights four lessons researchers can use to more directly study the connection between structural racism and health.

Authored by: How Housing Matters for The Urban Institute
Topics: Health, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Housing Is on May 2, 2019
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Publication Apr 24, 2019
Are you a Pennsylvanian without a high school diploma? Then sign up with AmeriHealth Caritas for Medicaid and the plan will help you get your GED. Having trouble getting a job in Ohio? If you are enrolled in CareSource, the Life Services JobConnect in CareSource’s managed care organization (MCO) will arrange job coaching and other employment services at no cost. These are not examples of corporate philanthropy. Rather, they reflect a growing recognition in the health care sector, especially among managed care organizations, that good health—and achieving lower medical costs—requires a focus...

Authored by: Stuart Butler for news@Jama
Topics: Education, Food insecurity, Health, Housing, Low-income, Nutrition, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 25, 2019
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Publication Apr 24, 2019
The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and states spend over $300 billion per year on the care of dually eligible individuals, yet still do not achieve acceptable health outcomes. In a 2016 study of social risk factors in the Medicare value-based purchasing programs, dual enrollment status was the most powerful predictor of poor outcomes. For example, relative to Medicare-only beneficiaries, dually eligible individuals had 10-31 percent higher risk-adjusted odds of hospital readmission across conditions measured in the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program, and scores were...

Authored by: Seema Verma for Health Affairs
Topics: Dual-eligibles, Funding, Health, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Research, Seniors
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 24, 2019
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The role of public and nonprofit hospitals and hospital systems in supportive housing is not an obvious one at first glance. Traditionally, the role of nonprofit and public hospitals has been to provide primary healthcare and additional health services to the public, often to select “catchment” areas or neighborhoods. The extent of these institutions’ role in housing was limited to either providing a) short-term inpatient beds for medical or treatment services, or b) residences for nurses or other hospital staff. Why then are more and more nonprofit and public hospitals becoming involved in...

Authored by: Richard Cho for CSH
Topics: Health, Homelessness, Housing, Partnerships, Research, Supportive housing
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 17, 2019
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Publication Apr 11, 2019
High-need, high-cost (HNHC) individuals are defined as people of all ages living with clinically complex needs and functional limitations who also incur high health care costs or are likely to do so in the near future. Despite frequent contact with the health care system and substantial medical spending, the physical, social, and behavioral health needs of these individuals often remain unmet due to uncoordinated and fragmented care. Studies suggest that HNHC individuals could benefit from a more holistic approach that coordinates the care they receive and addresses their unmet social needs....

Authored by: Janet Niles, Teresa Litton, and Robert Mechanic for Health Affairs
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Disabilities, Health, Research, Seniors
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 11, 2019
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Could Housing Solutions be Funded by Avoidance of Excess Shelter, Hospital, and Nursing Home Costs?

Authored by: Actionable Intelligence for Social Policy
Topics: Cost effectiveness, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Research, Seniors
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 11, 2019
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The Keeping Families Together model turned the usual paradigm for prioritizing affordable housing on its head. Rather than targeting the most “stable” families, Keeping Families Together sought out families with the most complicated cases—those at greatest risk. Thanks to this approach, families once on the brink of crisis now have a permanent place to call home, as well as the services and support they need to stay together.

Authored by: CSH
Topics: Child welfare, Family engagement, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Partnerships, Research, Supportive housing
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 4, 2019
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Managing director of Ascend at the Aspen Institute discusses the role of women in public health policy-making

Authored by: Ascend: The Aspen Institute
Topics: Dual-generation, Early childhood, Family engagement, Mental health, Pre-natal, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 2, 2019
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Publication Mar 28, 2019
On March 28, 2019, the campaign released the results of a national public opinion poll that it commissioned through Hart Research Associates. The poll is the first in several years to extensively assess the extent to which the public considers housing affordability to be a problem in their communities, whether they have had to make sacrifices in other areas of life because of housing costs, whether they expect action from elected officials, whether they are more likely to vote for a candidate that has a detailed plan to address the problem, and their openness to the specific policy solutions...

Authored by: Opportunity Starts at Home
Topics: Housing, Legislation & Policy, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 2, 2019
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Publication Mar 1, 2019
Released bi-monthly, each issue of the ZERO TO THREE Journal focuses on a critical topic within the early childhood development field. Journal articles are carefully composed to present current knowledge, latest research, and practical advice to help early childhood professionals do their best work in support of infants and toddlers.

Authored by: Zero To Three
Topics: Child welfare, Dual-generation, Early childhood, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Research, Safety
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Mar 26, 2019
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Publication Feb 26, 2019
With different drivers but a shared set of goals, public health, health care, social services, and other sectors can come together to work upstream and develop creative solutions to solve the complex problems facing communities today. To that end, with funding from the Robert Wood Johnson, the Public Health National Center for Innovations and the Center for Sharing Public Health Services partnered to launch the Cross-sector Innovation Initiative (CSII). The goal of the CSII is to support, promote and disseminate learning about the role of governmental public health departments in aligning...

Authored by: Jessica Solomon Fisher for JPHMP Direct
Topics: Data sharing, Health, Partnerships, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 19, 2019
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The Home Preservation Initiative (HPI) for Healthy Living seeks to improve asthma outcomes related to unhealthy housing in five neighborhoods in West Philadelphia. By combining home repairs and community health worker home visits, HPI aims to significantly reduce emergency department visits and hospitalizations due to pediatric asthma. For these primarily African-American communities, substandard housing, unemployment, low wages and a lack of education are barriers to the overall health and well-being of residents. Using outcome data, the collaboration will show health care cost savings,...

Authored by: The BUILD Health Challenge
Topics: Asthma, Cost effectiveness, Data sharing, East Coast, Health, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Partnerships, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 19, 2019
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Publication Jan 30, 2019
Understanding health disparity causes is an important first step toward developing policies or interventions to eliminate disparities, but their nature makes identifying and addressing their causes challenging.

Authored by: Mathematica Policy Research
Topics: Health, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 18, 2019
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The California Homeless Youth Project (HYP) is a research and policy initiative that highlights the issues and challenges faced by unaccompanied young people who are homeless or lack stable housing. This website provides state and local policymakers and others with information and policy resources specific to unaccompanied homeless youth, with a focus on young people in California.

Authored by: CA.gov
Topics: Education, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Research, West Coast
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 5, 2019
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Publication Feb 28, 2019
In light of the many costs generated by child poverty for the United States, a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine provides evidence-based policy and program packages that could cut the child poverty rate by as much as 50 percent while at the same time increasing employment and earnings among adults living in low-income families.

Authored by: The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine
Topics: Child welfare, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Mar 1, 2019
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Publication Feb 27, 2019
Over the past two decades, criminal justice reform has focused on evidence-based interventions to prevent arrests and incarceration and to facilitate community reintegration. These initiatives represent a movement toward a less punitive, more holistic approach to public safety, targeting critical social factors that lead to and perpetuate criminal justice involvement. Because housing problems are often a key underlying factor for people’s involvement with the criminal justice system, there are ways housing interventions can help lessen criminal justice involvement. Decriminalizing...

Authored by: Kimberly Burrowes for How Housing Matters (Urban Institute)
Topics: Criminal justice, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Research, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Feb 28, 2019
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We can imagine a future where everyone can find and afford a quality home. Where every neighborhood offers a diversity of housing options. And where people up and down the income ladder can enjoy housing security and build wealth through ownership. Achieving this vision requires more than incremental tinkering with today’s market institutions and public policies. It requires bold innovation by changemakers at all levels of government and in the private and nonprofit sectors.

Authored by: Urban Institute
Topics: Housing, Legislation & Policy, Mobility, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Feb 21, 2019
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Publication Jan 31, 2019
For many years, the vulnerabilities of children experiencing homelessness have been glossed over on the assumption that their innate resilience would overcome the impact of homelessness. As someone who worked in the field, I would often hear, “Oh, they’ll never remember.” Today we know better. We know more about how the brain develops and about how trauma impacts brain development. There is a growing recognition among providers that these early years are critical for establishing a foundation for emotional, mental, and physical wellbeing, and that we don’t get a second chance at early...

Authored by: Carol Klocek for SchoolHouse Connection
Topics: Early childhood, Education, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Research, Safety, Stability
Shared by Housing Is on Feb 21, 2019
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Publication Jan 15, 2019
Zoning, a topic usually buried in the real estate sections of local newspapers or debated at community planning meetings, has recently taken the national stage. Zoning figures prominently in the debates over the value that Amazon HQ2 will deliver to Arlington, Virginia, and New York City, while coverage of the affordable housing crisis in states like California blames local zoning restrictions. Cities like Minneapolis, which is radically rewriting its zoning codes, are being hailed as national models.

Authored by: Graham MacDonald, Solomon Greene, and Emma Nechamkin for the Urban Institute
Topics: Community development, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Feb 14, 2019
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Publication Feb 1, 2019
While there are many examples of small-scale programs that have integrated care and financing for Medicare-Medicaid eligible individuals, implementation at large scale has been elusive, often limited by concerns that savings will not materialize. The Medicare-Medicaid Coordination Office with its Financial Alignment Demonstration was specifically created to allow states to step forward and develop models that could substantially improve care for beneficiaries while delivering savings to states and the federal programs.We are now six years into this audacious set of pilots, which involve 12...

Authored by: Bruce A. Chernof for Milbank Memorial Fund
Topics: Health, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Feb 7, 2019
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Publication Jan 1, 2019
A healthy birth and positive experiences in early childhood can promote health and development. One approach that has improved outcomes for children and their parents is home visiting, which provides individually tailored support, resources, and information to expectant parents and families with young children. This brief summarizes recently published reports from two national studies of evidence-based early childhood home visiting: the Mother and Infant Home Visiting Program Evaluation (MIHOPE) and MIHOPE-Strong Start.

Authored by: MDRC
Topics: Child welfare, Dual-generation, Early childhood, Home visiting, Metrics, Partnerships, Place-based, Preventative care, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 31, 2019
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Evidence shows that retrofitting the entire stock of multifamily apartment buildings in the United States could save tenants and property owners $8 billion a year in energy costs and reduce electricity consumption by almost 15 percent. Amid the rising cost of housing, energy efficiency upgrades can provide much-needed relief to low-income families and help keep rental stock affordable, but few documented examples showcase the benefits of energy retrofits in multifamily housing. Addressing this gap, this study measures the impact of a collaborative energy efficiency program in Orlando, Florida...

Authored by: Nicholas Taylor, Jennison Searcy, and Pierce Jones for Energy Efficiency
Topics: Energy, Housing, Low-income, Research, Sustainability
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 31, 2019
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Publication Jan 30, 2019
To understand more about housing from an epidemiologist’s perspective, we spoke with Earle Chambers, an associate professor in the Department of Family and Social Medicine at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Chambers has documented the connections between housing and neighborhood conditions and health disparities among low-income Latinos in the Bronx.

Authored by: Lisette Vegas and Maya Brennan for How Housing Matters
Topics: Asthma, Community development, Depression, East Coast, Health, Obesity, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 31, 2019