Welcome to Housing Is, a hub for generating effective programs and sharing innovative ideas.

Sign Up or Sign In
 

RFP: CLPHA Housing Is Development Consultant

CLPHA is looking for a development consultant to identify multi-year funding opportunities and secure grant funds to support the ongoing sustainability of our Housing Is Initiative work.

View our RFP!
 

6th Annual Housing Is Summit April 30 & May 1

Register now to join practitioners, policymakers, executives, and researchers gathered in Washington, D.C., for CLPHA’s sixth annual Housing Is Summit, an event highlighting collaboration among the housing, education, and health sectors.

Get more info and register now!
 

Elements of a Successful Partnership

With generous support from the MacArthur Foundation, CLPHA developed an in-depth report on regional housing-education collaborations taking place at housing authorities across the Pacific-Northwest.

Read the Multimedia Report
 

National Snapshot of PHA-Health Partnerships

The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) provides new data about public housing authorities’ partnerships with the health sector and offers recommendations to encourage collaboration between these affordable housing providers and their health system partners.

Read the Report
 

Housing Is Summit 2019: Keynote Recap

Day Two of this year's Housing Is Summit began with an electrifying keynote by Dr. Camara Jones, a renowned epidemiologist and public health leader, who talked about the role of "social determinants of inequity" as they relate to health disparities and disparities in other key outcomes. 

View summary and video recording of Dr. Jones' keynote.
 
0
0
0
0
Interactive
Community:
NHC’s annual release of Paycheck to Paycheck provides insights into the ability of working households to afford typical housing in metropolitan areas across the country. The published report highlights the housing affordability challenges of workers within the construction industry across 259 metropolitan areas. See our methodology for more information on how we come up with our numbers (or use the same methodology to do your own analysis).

Authored by: National Housing Conference
Topics: Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income
Shared by Housing Is on May 1, 2019
0
0
0
0
Policy Brief
Community:
Congress has an important opportunity in 2019 to improve the health of millions of our nation’s children by passing a strong reauthorization that protects and strengthens the child nutrition programs. These successful, cost-effective federal nutrition programs play a critical role in helping children in low-income families achieve access to child care, educational, and enrichment activities while improving overall nutrition, health, development, and academic achievement.

Authored by: Feeding America and Food Research & Action Center
Topics: Child welfare, Early childhood, Food insecurity, Funding, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Nutrition
Shared by Housing Is on May 1, 2019
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Apr 23, 2019
Sweeping changes designed to make the food more nutritious in a federal assistance program for low-income families reduced the risk for obesity for 4-year-olds who had been on the program since birth, according to new research.

Authored by: UCLA Fielding School of Public Health
Topics: Early childhood, Food insecurity, Low-income, Nutrition, Obesity, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 29, 2019

UCLA-Tulane study finds improved WIC food packages reduced children's risk for obesity

Research
Apr 23, 2019
UCLA Fielding School of Public Health
Sweeping changes designed to make the food more nutritious in a federal assistance program for low-income families reduced the risk for obesity for 4-year-olds who had been on the program since birth, according to new research.
0
0
0
0
News Article
Community:
Apr 26, 2019
In the District of Columbia, low-income residents are being pushed out of neighborhoods at some of the highest rates in the country, according to the Institute on Metropolitan Opportunity, which sought to track demographic and economic changes in neighborhoods in the 50 largest U.S. cities from 2000 to 2016.

Authored by: Marissa J. Lang for The Washington Post
Topics: Community development, Housing, Low-income, Racial inequalities
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 26, 2019

Gentrification in D.C. means widespread displacement, bucking national trends, report says

News Article
Apr 26, 2019
Marissa J. Lang for The Washington Post
In the District of Columbia, low-income residents are being pushed out of neighborhoods at some of the highest rates in the country, according to the Institute on Metropolitan Opportunity, which sought to track demographic and economic changes in neighborhoods in the 50 largest U.S.
0
0
0
0
Publication
Community:
Apr 24, 2019
Are you a Pennsylvanian without a high school diploma? Then sign up with AmeriHealth Caritas for Medicaid and the plan will help you get your GED. Having trouble getting a job in Ohio? If you are enrolled in CareSource, the Life Services JobConnect in CareSource’s managed care organization (MCO) will arrange job coaching and other employment services at no cost. These are not examples of corporate philanthropy. Rather, they reflect a growing recognition in the health care sector, especially among managed care organizations, that good health—and achieving lower medical costs—requires a focus on the nonmedical factors known as social determinants that affect health and well-being.

Authored by: Stuart Butler for news@Jama
Topics: Education, Food insecurity, Health, Housing, Low-income, Nutrition, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 25, 2019
0
0
0
0
News Article
Community:
Apr 24, 2019
A new report from DePaul University’s Institute for Housing Studies shows that a loss of affordable rental units is a growing challenge across the city. The loss is especially acute in Logan Square and other neighborhoods on the city’s North and Northwest sides, the report says.

Authored by: Blair Kamin for The Chicago Tribune
Topics: Housing, Low-income
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 25, 2019

Rents rise, supply drops - Chicago's affordable housing woes mount

News Article
Apr 24, 2019
Blair Kamin for The Chicago Tribune
A new report from DePaul University’s Institute for Housing Studies shows that a loss of affordable rental units is a growing challenge across the city. The loss is especially acute in Logan Square and other neighborhoods on the city’s North and Northwest sides, the report says.
0
0
0
0
News Article
Community:
Apr 21, 2019
An EdSource analysis of teacher salaries and rents reveals just how crushing California’s housing crisis has become for many teachers.Teachers at the bottom of the salary scale working in coastal or metro areas of the state are being shut out of affordable housing. Many are spending more than 30% of their salary on rent, the federal cutoff for affordable housing.

Authored by: Diana Lambert and Daniel Willis for The San Francisco Chronicle
Topics: Education, Housing, Low-income, West Coast
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 25, 2019

California's teacher housing crunch: Rising rents in coastal areas outpace pay

News Article
Apr 21, 2019
Diana Lambert and Daniel Willis for The San Francisco Chronicle
An EdSource analysis of teacher salaries and rents reveals just how crushing California’s housing crisis has become for many teachers.Teachers at the bottom of the salary scale working in coastal or metro areas of the state are being shut out of affordable housing.
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
May 18, 2018
Parent involvement is associated with child academic outcomes, positive behaviors, and social skills. This qualitative study explored school-based parent involvement barriers experienced by nine low-income mothers. In-depth interviews were used to collect data from mothers participating in a community-based program offered in a large public housing neighborhood. Findings included three main barriers: (a) cultural and language differences in their children’s school, (b) undertones of racism from teachers and parents, and (c) being the primary caregiver or sole provider for their children. Although all parents experience challenges to school involvement, low-income mothers face additional obstacles preventing them from engaging in their children’s schools. This perceived lack of school involvement can lead to feelings of helplessness, shame, and stigma.

Authored by: Stephanie Lechuga-Pena and Daniel Brisson for TQR
Topics: Education, Family engagement, Housing, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 25, 2019

Barriers to School-Based Parent Involvement While Living in Public Housing: A Mother's Perspective

Research
May 18, 2018
Stephanie Lechuga-Pena and Daniel Brisson for TQR
Parent involvement is associated with child academic outcomes, positive behaviors, and social skills. This qualitative study explored school-based parent involvement barriers experienced by nine low-income mothers.
0
0
0
0
Publication
Community:
Apr 25, 2019
Adequate, safe, and affordable housing is one of our most basic needs. But in the US, access to housing is not guaranteed. Demand for affordable housing is growing, especially as housing costs increase beyond wage growth in many communities. Hospitals and health systems are stepping in to help fill this gap. Because of their mission orientation, the importance of stable housing on health outcomes, and policy changes initiated by the Affordable Care Act, hospitals and health systems are increasingly investing in and supporting the creation of affordable housing in their communities.

Authored by: Martha Fedorowicz and Kathryn Reynolds for How Housing Matters, The Urban Institute
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Community development, Health, Housing, Low-income
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 25, 2019

Three Ways Hospitals and Health Systems Can Improve How They Invest in Affordable Housing

Publication
Apr 25, 2019
Martha Fedorowicz and Kathryn Reynolds for How Housing Matters, The Urban Institute
Adequate, safe, and affordable housing is one of our most basic needs. But in the US, access to housing is not guaranteed. Demand for affordable housing is growing, especially as housing costs increase beyond wage growth in many communities.
0
0
0
0
Publication
Community:
Apr 24, 2019
The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and states spend over $300 billion per year on the care of dually eligible individuals, yet still do not achieve acceptable health outcomes. In a 2016 study of social risk factors in the Medicare value-based purchasing programs, dual enrollment status was the most powerful predictor of poor outcomes. For example, relative to Medicare-only beneficiaries, dually eligible individuals had 10-31 percent higher risk-adjusted odds of hospital readmission across conditions measured in the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program, and scores were lower for dually eligible individuals on nearly all (17 of 19) beneficiary-level quality measures in Medicare Advantage.

Authored by: Seema Verma for Health Affairs
Topics: Dual-eligibles, Funding, Health, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Research, Seniors
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 24, 2019
0
0
0
0
Report
Community:
Apr 1, 2019
College Promise programs aim to make students believe they can afford college, and to give them the opportunity to go to college and earn degrees without taking on significant debt. At the core of all College Promise programs is a scholarship: All eligible College Promise students receive scholarships that may cover up to 100 percent of tuition and fees at postsecondary institutions. Additionally, many Promise programs are designing, implementing, and refining additions to their models by providing students with support services once they enroll in college. MDRC’s College Promise Success Initiative (CPSI) provides important lessons for Promise programs interested in including such services.This brief shares early lessons from CPSI about how different Promise programs are designing, implementing, and refining their models with embedded student services in mind.

Authored by: Jacklyn Willard, Andrea Vasquez, and Marco Lepe for MDRC
Topics: Education, Low-income, Post-secondary, Research, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 24, 2019
0
0
0
0
Report
Community:
Apr 20, 2019
Detroit’s Promise program was designed to encourage college attendance among some of the nation’s most underserved students, those in Detroit, Michigan. The next step was to help students succeed once they enrolled in college. To do so, MDRC and the Detroit Promise partnered to create the Detroit Promise Path, an evidence-based student services program. Detroit Promise Path students begin meeting with college coaches in the late summer before their first semester of college. They are given an incentive to attend coaching meetings in the form of a monthly gift card refilled with $50 each month that they meet with coaches as directed. The program lasts all year, including summer semesters, when students are encouraged to enroll in summer classes or engage in a local summer jobs program. The entire operation is supported by a management information system.

Authored by: MDRC
Topics: Education, Low-income, Midwest, Post-secondary, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 24, 2019
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Apr 1, 2019
Serious mental illness (SMI) is a disabling condition that develops early in life and imposes substantial economic burden. There is a growing belief that early intervention for SMI has lifelong benefits for patients. However, assessing the cost-effectiveness of early intervention efforts is hampered by a lack of evidence on the long-term benefits. We addressed this by using a dynamic microsimulation model to estimate the lifetime burden of SMI for those diagnosed by age twenty-five.

Authored by: Health Affairs
Topics: Disabilities, Education, Low-income, Mental health, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 23, 2019

Measuring The Lifetime Costs of Serious Mental Illness And The Mitigating Effects of Educational Attainment

Research
Apr 1, 2019
Health Affairs
Serious mental illness (SMI) is a disabling condition that develops early in life and imposes substantial economic burden. There is a growing belief that early intervention for SMI has lifelong benefits for patients.
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Apr 16, 2019
This report presents a case study of the Chicago Housing Authority’s (CHA’s) work requirement policy, one of a small number of work requirements implemented by housing authorities. The report describes the CHA work requirement, the policy’s implementation and how it has changed, and perceptions of implementation and outcomes from key CHA and service provider staff and residents. The CHA work requirement has been in place for nearly 10 years, allowing us to analyze implementation over time and outcomes.

Authored by: Diane K. Levy, Leiha Edmonds, Samantha Batko, and Marcus Gaddy for The Urban Institute
Topics: Asset building, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Midwest, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 23, 2019
0
0
0
0
News Article
Community:
Apr 17, 2019
A survey of LGBTQ Midwesterners and their families finds they are more likely to receive public assistance than non-LGBTQ people.

Authored by: Cincinnati Public Radio
Topics: Low-income, Midwest, Stability
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 22, 2019
0
0
0
0
Interactive
Community:
Displacement tracts are those showing strong economic expansion and a net decline in low-income population. Concentration tracts are those showing strong economic decline and a net increase in low-income population.

Authored by: Institute on Metropolitan Opportunity at the University of Minnesota Law School
Topics: Community development, Low-income, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 18, 2019

Low Income Displacement and Concentration in U.S. Census Tracts, 2000-2016

Interactive
Institute on Metropolitan Opportunity at the University of Minnesota Law School
Displacement tracts are those showing strong economic expansion and a net decline in low-income population. Concentration tracts are those showing strong economic decline and a net increase in low-income population.
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
Nov 27, 2018
A growing body of research suggests that housing eviction is more common than previously recognized and may play an important role in the reproduction of poverty. The proportion of children affected by housing eviction, however, remains largely unknown. We estimate that one in seven children born in large U.S. cities in 1998–2000 experienced at least one eviction for nonpayment of rent or mortgage between birth and age 15. Rates of eviction were substantial across all cities and demographic groups studied, but children from disadvantaged backgrounds were most likely to experience eviction. Among those born into deep poverty, we estimate that approximately one in four were evicted by age 15. Given prior evidence that forced moves have negative consequences for children, we conclude that the high prevalence and social stratification of housing eviction are sufficient to play an important role in the reproduction of poverty and warrant greater policy attention.

Authored by: Ian Lundberg and Louis Donnelly
Topics: Early childhood, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 18, 2019

A Research Note on the Prevalance of Housing Eviction Among Children Born in U.S. Cities

Research
Nov 27, 2018
Ian Lundberg and Louis Donnelly
A growing body of research suggests that housing eviction is more common than previously recognized and may play an important role in the reproduction of poverty. The proportion of children affected by housing eviction, however, remains largely unknown.
0
0
0
0
News Article
Community:
Apr 15, 2019
Rapid re-housing was designed for people experiencing homelessness who have a good chance of paying for their own housing after a one-time boost. The Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority, which manages Measure H spending, is using the program to house a much wider segment of the homeless population.

Authored by: Madeleine Brand for KCRW
Topics: Funding, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, West Coast
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 18, 2019
0
1
1
0
Publication
Community:
Apr 8, 2019
In 2015, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) prevented 8.4 million people from living in poverty. This essential and effective safety net program helps people with low incomes purchase food for themselves and their families—an estimated 40.8 million Americans were living in poverty in 2015; absent SNAP benefits, that number would have been 49.1 million. Despite its success, SNAP is facing rule changes that would cause people to lose benefits—harming those who need it most and weakening the poverty-fighting power of the program.

Authored by: Anthony Barrows for Ideas 42
Topics: Food insecurity, Health, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Nutrition
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 18, 2019
0
0
0
0
News Article
Community:
Apr 4, 2019
Education Design Lab taps four large community colleges in an ambitious effort to raise single-mother completion rate 30 percent at each institution by 2024.

Authored by: Education Design Lab for Ciston PR Newswire
Topics: Dual-generation, Early childhood, Family engagement, Low-income, Metrics, Post-secondary
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 18, 2019
0
0
0
0
Publication
Community:
Founded in 1995 as Project Women, Family Scholar House (FSH) provides comprehensive, holistic services for disadvantaged single parents, their children, and foster alumni. The nonprofit seeks to end the cycle of poverty and transform communities by empowering families and youth to succeed in education and life-long self-sufficiency. FSH provides supportive housing, educational programming, and participant advocacy to help families gain independence.

Authored by: American Planning Association
Topics: Dual-generation, Early childhood, Education, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Partnerships, Place-based, Post-secondary, South, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 18, 2019
0
0
0
0
News Article
Community:
Mar 13, 2019
Lawmakers are currently considering legislation meant to put some extra cash in the pockets of families like Franson’s. House Bill 1527 and its companion, Senate Bill 5810, would create the Working Families Tax Credit, which supporters say would make Washington’s tax code less regressive while helping households with the rising cost of living. The federal government and other states have similar programs and use rely on income tax returns to distribute credits. Washington has no income tax. If the bill passes, people would apply through the state Employment Security Department, which would determine eligibility and calculate and write checks to those eligible.

Authored by: Jake Thomas for The Columbian
Topics: Asset building, Funding, Legislation & Policy, Low-income
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 18, 2019
0
0
0
0
News Article
Community:
Mar 19, 2019
For 17 years, physicians, nurse practitioners and pediatric residents at our hospital, and presently, at more than 80 locations throughout the region, have been participating in Reach Out and Read of Greater Philadelphia (www.reachoutandreadphilly.org), a simple yet profound way to harness the power of a book to potentially alter a child’s health trajectory.

Authored by: Daniel Taylor for The Inquirer
Topics: Early childhood, East Coast, Education, Grade-level proficiency, Health, Literacy, Low-income
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 18, 2019

This Philly pediatrician always prescribes reading to patients and parents. Here's why.

News Article
Mar 19, 2019
Daniel Taylor for The Inquirer
For 17 years, physicians, nurse practitioners and pediatric residents at our hospital, and presently, at more than 80 locations throughout the region, have been participating in Reach Out and Read of Greater Philadelphia (www.reachoutandreadphilly.org), a simple yet profound way to harness the power
0
0
0
0
Research
Community:
To what extent is there a mix of incomes within the LIHTC complexes? Is it realistic to expect properties without an explicit mixed-income focus to create and sustain mixed-income communities?

Authored by: Raphael Bostic, Andrew Jakabovics, Richard Voith, and Sean Zielenback
Topics: Housing, Low-income, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 17, 2019

Mixed-Income LIHTC Developments in Chicago: A First Look at Their Income Characteristics and Spillover Impacts

Research
Raphael Bostic, Andrew Jakabovics, Richard Voith, and Sean Zielenback
To what extent is there a mix of incomes within the LIHTC complexes? Is it realistic to expect properties without an explicit mixed-income focus to create and sustain mixed-income communities?
0
0
0
0
News Article
Community:
Apr 14, 2019
In 2014 Caselli started Haven Connect, which is now based in Austin, to make it easier for property managers to communicate with affordable housing applicants, including those who are and aren’t homeless, and for applicants to update their information online.

Authored by: Anne Field for Forbes
Topics: Broadband, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Partnerships, South
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 16, 2019