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Elements of a Successful Partnership

With generous support from the MacArthur Foundation, CLPHA developed an in-depth report on regional housing-education collaborations taking place at housing authorities across the Pacific-Northwest.

Read the Multimedia Report
 

National Snapshot of PHA-Health Partnerships

The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) provides new data about public housing authorities’ partnerships with the health sector and offers recommendations to encourage collaboration between these affordable housing providers and their health system partners.

Read the Report
 
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Video
Community:
Jun 17, 2022
The Low Income Investment Fund (LIIF) will moderate a unique cross-sector panel of housing and early care and education (ECE) experts on strategies and best practices for co-locating ECE facilities within affordable housing developments. Discussion of specific financing techniques and site design considerations from existing co-located facilities will provide attendees lessons on policy and programmatic changes needed to incentivize co-location. Panelists include innovators in affordable housing development, government and public sectors, early care and education operations, and community development finance.

Authored by:
Topics: Advocacy, Broadband, Child welfare, CLPHA, Family engagement, Food insecurity, Health, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Nutrition, School-readiness, Supportive housing, Sustainability
Shared by Karina George on Jun 17, 2022

CLPHA Housing Is Summit 2022: Meeting Families' Needs Including Child Care in Housing Developments

Video
Jun 17, 2022
The Low Income Investment Fund (LIIF) will moderate a unique cross-sector panel of housing and early care and education (ECE) experts on strategies and best practices for co-locating ECE facilities within affordable housing developments.
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Publication
Community:
Jun 11, 2019
The Trump Administration is publicly weighing plans to gradually lower the official poverty line by applying a smaller cost-of-living adjustment each year. Doing so would be unjustified for several reasons.

Authored by: Arloc Sherman and Paul Van de Water for The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
Topics: Child welfare, Food insecurity, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Nutrition, Stability
Shared by Housing Is on Jun 11, 2019

Reducing Cost-of-Living Adjustment Would Make Poverty Line a Less Accurate Measure of Basic Needs

Publication
Jun 11, 2019
Arloc Sherman and Paul Van de Water for The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
The Trump Administration is publicly weighing plans to gradually lower the official poverty line by applying a smaller cost-of-living adjustment each year. Doing so would be unjustified for several reasons.
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Publication
Community:
This paper analyzes why SNAP benefits are inadequate, reviews the body of research showing positive effects from more adequate SNAP benefits, and offers key policy solutions to improve benefit adequacy.

Authored by: Food Research & Action Center (FRAC)
Topics: Food insecurity, Health, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Nutrition, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Jun 11, 2019

Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program: Initiatives to Make SNAP Benefits More Adequate Significantly Improve Food Security, Nutrition, and Health

Publication
Food Research & Action Center (FRAC)
This paper analyzes why SNAP benefits are inadequate, reviews the body of research showing positive effects from more adequate SNAP benefits, and offers key policy solutions to improve benefit adequacy.
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Publication
Community:
Moving Health Care Upstream (MHCU) is based on the belief that health systems can address persistent and costly health inequities by moving “upstream”—beyond the walls of hospitals and clinics and into the communities, collaborating with community-based organizations to address the root causes of disease. The various areas of work within MHCU share a common focus-supporting hospitals and community stakeholders in testing and spreading strategies to move upstream, and sharing “what works” to inform the field and accelerate the upstream movement in the field as a whole. Policy Learning Labs are one example of MHCU’s work to spread knowledge and accelerate action in the field.

Authored by: Nemours, Moving Health Care Upstream, and Change Lab Solutions
Topics: Child welfare, Early childhood, Food insecurity, Green, Health, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Nutrition, Partnerships, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on May 1, 2019

Policy Learning Lab Compendium of Research & Technical Assistance Memos

Publication
Nemours, Moving Health Care Upstream, and Change Lab Solutions
Moving Health Care Upstream (MHCU) is based on the belief that health systems can address persistent and costly health inequities by moving “upstream”—beyond the walls of hospitals and clinics and into the communities, collaborating with community-based organizations to address the root causes of di
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Publication
Community:
Apr 24, 2019
Are you a Pennsylvanian without a high school diploma? Then sign up with AmeriHealth Caritas for Medicaid and the plan will help you get your GED. Having trouble getting a job in Ohio? If you are enrolled in CareSource, the Life Services JobConnect in CareSource’s managed care organization (MCO) will arrange job coaching and other employment services at no cost. These are not examples of corporate philanthropy. Rather, they reflect a growing recognition in the health care sector, especially among managed care organizations, that good health—and achieving lower medical costs—requires a focus on the nonmedical factors known as social determinants that affect health and well-being.

Authored by: Stuart Butler for news@Jama
Topics: Education, Food insecurity, Health, Housing, Low-income, Nutrition, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 25, 2019
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Publication
Community:
Apr 16, 2019
When it comes to the federally funded Afterschool and Summer Meal Programs, what is the trick to engaging teens better? Across the country, both anti-hunger advocates and out-of-school time program providers are asking themselves this very question.

Authored by: Clarissa Hayes for Food Research & Action Center (FRAC)
Topics: Food insecurity, Nutrition, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 22, 2019

3 Tips for Engaging Teens in The Summer And In Afterschool Meal Programs

Publication
Apr 16, 2019
Clarissa Hayes for Food Research & Action Center (FRAC)
When it comes to the federally funded Afterschool and Summer Meal Programs, what is the trick to engaging teens better? Across the country, both anti-hunger advocates and out-of-school time program providers are asking themselves this very question.
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Publication
Community:
Apr 8, 2019
In 2015, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) prevented 8.4 million people from living in poverty. This essential and effective safety net program helps people with low incomes purchase food for themselves and their families—an estimated 40.8 million Americans were living in poverty in 2015; absent SNAP benefits, that number would have been 49.1 million. Despite its success, SNAP is facing rule changes that would cause people to lose benefits—harming those who need it most and weakening the poverty-fighting power of the program.

Authored by: Anthony Barrows for Ideas 42
Topics: Food insecurity, Health, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Nutrition
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 18, 2019
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Publication
Community:
Mar 21, 2019
School districts, teachers, and students across the country are beginning to prepare for spring break even though snow still blankets the ground in many states. While many students welcome the break from classes, for many others spring break also means a break from the nutritious school meals and afterschool suppers and snacks they rely on to remain engaged, active, and healthy.

Authored by: Clarissa Hayes for Food Research & Action Center (FRAC)
Topics: Child welfare, Education, Food insecurity, Low-income, Nutrition
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 2, 2019
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Interactive
Community:
This interactive map provides state-by-state data on Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) participation rates among eligible seniors and for comparison, participation rates among all eligible individuals. FRAC’s map and accompanying tables show that just 42 percent of eligible seniors (60+) are using SNAP on average each month — compared to 83 percent of all SNAP-eligible people that participate in SNAP.

Authored by: Food Research & Action Center (FRAC)
Topics: Food insecurity, Health, Nutrition, Seniors
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 2, 2019
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Interactive
Community:
Includes: The Strength of SNAP and SNAP Action Needed, The Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP), Commodity Supplemental Food Program (CSFP), and Child Nutrition Reauthorization.

Authored by: Food Research & Action Center (FRAC)
Topics: Food insecurity, Funding, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Nutrition
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Mar 1, 2019
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Video
Community:
Feb 20, 2019
With the active support of their residents, HABG converted a 34-passenger bus donated by Warren County Public Schools. The new mobile grocery store will offer fresh fruits and vegetables to families who currently live in a 'food desert' where the cost of eating healthy can be beyond their reach. HAGB's new mobile grocery store will visit public housing developments and other low-income neighborhoods in Bowling Green to help residents lower their food costs by offering affordable groceries, including fresh produce grown at HAGB. More than 90 residents were surveyed and almost everyone said they would use the mobile grocery store at least once weekly.

Authored by: Housing Authority of Bowling Green
Topics: Food insecurity, Health, Housing, Low-income, Nutrition, Place-based
Shared by Housing Is on Feb 28, 2019
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Publication
Community:
Sep 1, 2018
The firearm, obesity, and opioid epidemics are among the most important public health crises of our time. Each epidemic has a complex etiology that challenges efforts at mitigation. From this, a central question arises for researchers, clinicians, and policymakers: How can we identify what matters most within a broad range of causal factors in these epidemics, and can we draw cross-epidemic inferences that will help inform our thinking?

Authored by: Sandro Galea for Milbank Memorial Fund
Topics: Food insecurity, Health, Low-income, Nutrition, Obesity, Partnerships, Safety, Substance abuse
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 24, 2019
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Publication
Community:
Jan 24, 2019
Affordable housing campaigns are not new, of course, but what is unprecedented and transformative about Opportunity Starts at Home is the scope and diversity of the partners that are joining forces to advocate for more robust and equitable federal housing policies. The campaign is advised by a Steering Committee including leading national organizations representing a wide range of interests that are working shoulder-to-shoulder to solve the affordable housing crisis.

Authored by: Opportunity Starts at Home
Topics: Asset building, Child welfare, CLPHA, Community development, Early childhood, Education, Food insecurity, Funding, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Immigrants, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Mobility, Out-of-school time, Partnerships, Racial inequalities, Safety, Seniors, Stability, Substance abuse, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 24, 2019

Within Reach: Ambitious Federal Solutions to Meet the Housing Needs of the Most Vulnerable People

Publication
Jan 24, 2019
Opportunity Starts at Home
Affordable housing campaigns are not new, of course, but what is unprecedented and transformative about Opportunity Starts at Home is the scope and diversity of the partners that are joining forces to advocate for more robust and equitable federal housing policies.
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Publication
Community:
“Families are borrowing from already-limited food budgets to keep a roof over their heads”

Authored by: Opportunity Starts at Home
Topics: Food insecurity, Housing, Nutrition, Partnerships, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 18, 2019
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Publication
Community:
Jan 1, 2019
Postsecondary attainment is increasingly necessary to move out of poverty and homelessness and live a healthy, productive life. Yet youth experiencing homelessness face barriers in transitioning from secondary to postsecondary education, as well as barriers to financial aid, college retention, and college completion. This fact sheet summarizes existing data and information on the higher education experiences of homeless youth.

Authored by: SchoolHouse Connection
Topics: Education, Food insecurity, Homelessness, Housing, Post-secondary, Research, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 16, 2019
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Publication
Community:
Dec 20, 2018
The Trump Administration proposed draconian changes today in a key SNAP (food stamp) rule which, if implemented, would cut off basic food assistance for hundreds of thousands of the nation’s poorest and most destitute people. The Administration and House Republican leaders sought, but failed, to secure these changes as part of the farm bill that Congress just passed. The Administration is now proposing to implement, through executive action, what it failed to secure through legislation.

Authored by: Robert Greenstein for The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
Topics: Food insecurity, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Nutrition, Workforce development
Shared by Housing Is on Dec 20, 2018

Trump SNAP Proposal Would Cost Many of Nation's Poorest Their Food Aid

Publication
Dec 20, 2018
Robert Greenstein for The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
The Trump Administration proposed draconian changes today in a key SNAP (food stamp) rule which, if implemented, would cut off basic food assistance for hundreds of thousands of the nation’s poorest and most destitute people.
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Publication
Community:
Dec 17, 2018
Stricter work requirement policies for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) at the federal level were left out of the recently passed farm bill, but state policymakers are still considering whether to expand or establish their own work requirements for SNAP and Medicaid, with the goal of incentivizing employment. There’s no question that good jobs help spur upward mobility. But if we are serious about helping people work, we have to get serious about helping people improve their skills.

Authored by: Gina Adams and Shayne Spaulding for The Urban Institute
Topics: Child welfare, Cost effectiveness, Dual-generation, Early childhood, Food insecurity, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Research, Stability, Workforce development
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 17, 2018

Work requirement policies must consider parents' need for child care

Publication
Dec 17, 2018
Gina Adams and Shayne Spaulding for The Urban Institute
Stricter work requirement policies for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) at the federal level were left out of the recently passed farm bill, but state policymakers are still considering whether to expand or establish their own work requirements for SNAP and Medicaid, with the goa
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Publication
Community:
Resources and presentation slides

Authored by: Food Research & Action Center
Topics: Food insecurity, Housing, Immigrants, Legislation & Policy
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 15, 2018
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Publication
Community:
Jan 1, 2018
SAHF members believe that connecting residents of affordable housing with needed supports – such as educational resources or health services – can help vulnerable families and seniors achieve a better quality of life. SAHF began the Outcomes Initiative to create a common framework for its members to demonstrate with data the impact on residents of providing housing-based services and support in the five key areas listed below.

Authored by: Stewards of Affordable Housing for the Future (SAHF)
Topics: Asset building, Cost effectiveness, Dual-generation, Education, Exercise, Food insecurity, Health, Housing, Mental health, Metrics, Nutrition, Safety, Stability
Shared by Housing Is on Jul 26, 2018
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Publication
Community:
Jul 24, 2018
The community development “industry”—a network of nonprofit service providers, real estate developers, financial institutions, foundations, and government—draws on public subsidies and other financing to transform impoverished neighborhoods into better-functioning communities. Although such activity positively affects the “upstream” causes of poor health, the community development industry rarely collaborates with the health sector or even considers health effects in its work. We propose a four-point plan to help ensure that existing and future collaborations achieve positive outcomes and sustainable progress for residents and investors alike.

Authored by:
Topics: Community development, Food insecurity, Funding, Health, Low-income, Partnerships, Supportive housing, Transportation
Shared by Housing Is on Jul 24, 2018

Partnerships Among Community Development, Public Health, and Health Care Could Improve the Well-Being of Low-Income People

Publication
Jul 24, 2018
The community development “industry”—a network of nonprofit service providers, real estate developers, financial institutions, foundations, and government—draws on public subsidies and other financing to transform impoverished neighborhoods into better-functioning communities.
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Publication
Community:
Jul 12, 2018
This brief aims to bring attention to non-Medicaid funding sources that states could potentially blend or braid to address social determinants of health and other needs that are not typically covered by Medicaid. It is intended to familiarize state Medicaid, public health, and other state policymakers with the funding streams of other agencies, and sketch out a continuum of options to help states coordinate funding to better serve the needs of low-income populations. Because this brief focuses on services for adult Medicaid beneficiaries, it does not address many of the funding sources available for children’s services. However, existing efforts to pool funds for children and youth—notably by the Commonwealth of Virginia—could prove instructive for states seeking to launch such an effort for adults.

Authored by:
Topics: Cost effectiveness, Data sharing, Dual-eligibles, Food insecurity, Funding, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Mental health, Partnerships, Research, Substance abuse
Shared by Housing Is on Jul 12, 2018

Braiding & Blending Funding Streams to Meet the Health-Related Social Needs of Low-Income Persons: Considerations for State Health Policymakers

Publication
Jul 12, 2018
This brief aims to bring attention to non-Medicaid funding sources that states could potentially blend or braid to address social determinants of health and other needs that are not typically covered by Medicaid.