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Elements of a Successful Partnership

With generous support from the MacArthur Foundation, CLPHA developed an in-depth report on regional housing-education collaborations taking place at housing authorities across the Pacific-Northwest.

Read the Multimedia Report
 

National Snapshot of PHA-Health Partnerships

The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) provides new data about public housing authorities’ partnerships with the health sector and offers recommendations to encourage collaboration between these affordable housing providers and their health system partners.

Read the Report
 
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Policy Brief
Community:
May 5, 2021
In March 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic forced many public housing authorities (PHAs) to quickly adjust their operational procedures to protect their staff while providing emergency assistance to residents. Many PHAs had to close their offices and convert to remote operations almost overnight, while staff focused on supporting their tenants by delivering them food, doing wellness checks for vulnerable residents, and ensuring they had access to and in some cases providing the technology needed for children to attend school remotely and isolated residents to remain connected to friends, family, and service providers. Moreover, as the economic crisis caused by the pandemic worsened, PHAs were under pressure to rapidly adjust rents for tenants who had lost income and process housing choice voucher (HCV) applications so people could use their vouchers to find housing. This brief provides insights into how public housing authorities used additional flexibilities that became available through a series of HUD-issued regulatory and statutory waivers, and makes the case for the potential benefits for added flexibilities for the HCV and public housing programs going forward.

Authored by: Monique King-Viehl, Elizabeth Champion, & Susan J. Popkin for URBAN INSTITUTE
Topics: Advocacy, COVID-19, Data sharing, Health, Housing, Safety, Supportive housing
Shared by Housing Is on May 25, 2021
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Policy Brief
Community:
Dec 4, 2019
In California, more than 3.7 million students were eligible for free or reduced priced school meals in the 2017-2018 school year. For many of those students, school meals are the primary source of regular access to healthy food. When the bell rings at 3:00 or lets out for summer break, many of those students go home to nutritional uncertainty or high-calorie, low-nutrient foods. For many low-income families, the out-of-school-time food access gap increases family stress: limited budgets are stretched further to cover food, rent, utilities, transportation, medications, and chidcare costs. For very young children, food insecurity can negatively impact brain and physical development. For children of all ages, disrupted access to healthy food can impact behavior, increase risk of obesity, make it harder to concentrate, or exacerbate existing healthy conditions like type 2 diabetes. The impact is not limited to summer, and can lead to a rocky start to the school year, negatively impacting school attendance and students’ ability to effectively participate in school. Read the full brief to learn how public and affordable housing communities can address food insecurity for children and youth with the help of out-of-school-time USDA child nutrition programs.

Authored by:
Topics: Advocacy, Early childhood, Food insecurity, Health, Healthy homes, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Nutrition, Out-of-school time, West Coast, Youth
Shared by Linda Lu on Dec 4, 2019

Keeping Kids Healthy and Engaged When School is Out Through Public and Affordable Housing Communities

Policy Brief
Dec 4, 2019
In California, more than 3.7 million students were eligible for free or reduced priced school meals in the 2017-2018 school year. For many of those students, school meals are the primary source of regular access to healthy food.
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Policy Brief
Community:
Jun 4, 2019
The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has announced its intention to roll back protections for transgender people experiencing homelessness. The newly proposed rule, which is in the early stages of the rulemaking process and has not yet been publicly posted to the Federal Register, would allow homeless shelters to discriminate based on gender identity, putting transgender people in danger of violence and further housing instability. This is part of a long string of attacks the Trump administration has directed toward the transgender community, such as implementing the infamous military ban, contributing to a pattern that legally perpetuates discrimination against transgender people in this country.

Authored by: Aastha Uprety for Equal Rights Center
Topics: Health, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Racial inequalities
Shared by Housing Is on Jun 13, 2019
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Interactive
Community:
Self-paced courses for home visitors and supervisors and webinars that cover: the basics of home visiting, foundations of infant mental health in home visiting, domestic violence in home visiting, substance abuse in home visiting, the impact of trauma on home visiting, building engaging and collaborative relationships with families, and home visiting with families during pregnancy.

Authored by: The Ounce
Topics: Child welfare, Early childhood, Health, Home visiting
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 29, 2019
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Interactive
Community:
The Legal Bibliography is collection of 100+ papers, toolkits and other materials focused on privacy, consent and policy documentation. Co-developed by the Network for Public Health Law and Data Across Sectors for Health (DASH), the Bibliography is a growing resource for lawyers and community data practitioners, intended to support local collaboratives in their efforts to share data across sectors.

Authored by: Data Across Sectors for Health (DASH) and Network for Public Health Law (NPHL)
Topics: Criminal justice, Data sharing, Education, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Mental health, Partnerships, Safety
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 8, 2019
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Interactive
Community:
This interactive map provides state-by-state data on Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) participation rates among eligible seniors and for comparison, participation rates among all eligible individuals. FRAC’s map and accompanying tables show that just 42 percent of eligible seniors (60+) are using SNAP on average each month — compared to 83 percent of all SNAP-eligible people that participate in SNAP.

Authored by: Food Research & Action Center (FRAC)
Topics: Food insecurity, Health, Nutrition, Seniors
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 2, 2019
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Policy Brief
Community:
Oct 1, 2016
Emerging health care financing models require much more sophisticated actuarial calculations than previous payment arrangements, often taking into account risk factors such as homelessness. Homelessness also has direct implications for clinical treatment decisions and integrated care models and should be noted in individual patient records. This policy brief provides a rationale for using the ICD-10-CM code for homelessness, outlines the challenges to maximizing this code, and offers strategies to consider to ensure health care providers ask about homelessness and record patients’ housing status. This data is highly relevant to clinicians and administrators at health centers, hospitals, state Medicaid systems, Medicaid managed care organizations, and public health departments.

Authored by: National Health Care for the Homeless Council
Topics: Health, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Mar 26, 2019
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Interactive
Community:
Mar 20, 2019
As the population ages, one of the greatest challenges facing state officials is how to organize and pay for long-term services and supports (LTSS) for low-income elderly and disabled adults—the most complex, expensive, and fastest-growing group covered by Medicaid. To help address this challenge, a toolkit for state leaders published in 2017 has been updated.

Authored by: Manatt Health Strategies and PhD Center for Health Care Strategies
Topics: Disabilities, Health, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Partnerships, Seniors
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 26, 2019

Strengthening Medicaid Long-Term Services and Supports in an Evolving Policy Environment: A Toolkit for States

Interactive
Mar 20, 2019
Manatt Health Strategies and PhD Center for Health Care Strategies
As the population ages, one of the greatest challenges facing state officials is how to organize and pay for long-term services and supports (LTSS) for low-income elderly and disabled adults—the most complex, expensive, and fastest-growing group covered by Medicaid.
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Interactive
Community:
After working with 37 communities across the country over the last three years to drive sustainable improvements in community health we’ve we’ve seen how when specific approaches are implemented, namely Bold, Upstream, Integrated, Local, and Data-Driven approaches, meaningful change affecting the health of a community can happen. We’ve done our best to document the processes, the successes, and the failures along the way, and from those real-world experiences we’ve created a set of preliminary tools that can inform and guide those interested in learning about the unique BUILD approach.

Authored by: All In: Data for Community Health
Topics: Community development, Data sharing, Health, Partnerships
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 19, 2019
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Interactive
Community:
The NQP Social Determinants of Health Data Integration Action Team brings together experts and recognized leaders from the private and public sectors committed to accelerating the integration of data on social determinants of health (SDOH) into clinical practice. Through a series of web meetings and one in-person forum, the NQP Social Determinants of Health Data Integration Action Team Action Team will develop and share successful approaches to integrating SDOH data to support providers and communities in their efforts to eliminate disparities.

Authored by: National Quality Forum
Topics: Data sharing, Health, Partnerships, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 18, 2019
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Interactive
Community:
On behalf of All In: Data for Community Health, Data Across Sectors for Health (DASH) is conducting The 2019 National Inventory of Data Sharing Collaborations for Health to better understand the location and nature of multi-sector collaborations in the United States, their capacity for data-sharing to improve health, and to assess progress in this field among multi-sector collaborations. Your participation in The National Inventory will also help us identify areas for further learning and opportunities to support and expand these activities. All In: Data for Community Health is a learning network of communities that are testing exciting new ways to systematically improve community health outcomes through multi-sector collaborations using shared data.

Authored by: All In: Data for Community Health
Topics: Data sharing, Health, Partnerships, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 13, 2019

2019 National Inventory of Data Sharing Collaborations for Health

Interactive
All In: Data for Community Health
On behalf of All In: Data for Community Health, Data Across Sectors for Health (DASH) is conducting The 2019 National Inventory of Data Sharing Collaborations for Health to better understand the location and nature of multi-sector collaborations in the United States, their capacity for data-sharing
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Policy Brief
Community:
This annotated resource compilation is intended to help state and local agencies access information and resources needed to better understand the federal legal protections and requirements associated with datasets collected by federal agencies or as part of a federally funded program.

Authored by: The Network for Public Health Law
Topics: Data sharing, Disabilities, Early childhood, Education, Health, Homelessness, Legislation & Policy, Post-secondary
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Feb 20, 2019

Federal Privacy Laws

Policy Brief
The Network for Public Health Law
This annotated resource compilation is intended to help state and local agencies access information and resources needed to better understand the federal legal protections and requirements associated with datasets collected by federal agencies or as part of a federally funded program.
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Policy Brief
Community:
More than one-third of adult public housing residents in the US smoke—totaling approximately 400,000 smokers, putting other residents and staff at risk of negative health effects.

Authored by: Building Success
Topics: Asthma, Health, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Place-based, Smoke-free
Shared by Housing Is on Feb 4, 2019
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Policy Brief
Community:
Jan 30, 2019
Under the continuing resolution (CR) that provided the funding to reopen the government for three weeks, SNAP (food stamps) now is fully funded at least through March, even if the government shuts down again on February 15. Millions of families, however, face a longer-than-usual gap between their February and March benefits because the Agriculture Department worked with states to issue February benefits early during the shutdown, and that could further strain household budgets, the emergency food network, and other community resources.

Authored by: Dottie Rensbaum for The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
Topics: Food insecurity, Funding, Health, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Nutrition
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 30, 2019

SNAP Can Cover Full Benefits Through March, But Participants Face Big Gaps Between February and March Benefits

Policy Brief
Jan 30, 2019
Dottie Rensbaum for The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
Under the continuing resolution (CR) that provided the funding to reopen the government for three weeks, SNAP (food stamps) now is fully funded at least through March, even if the government shuts down again on February 15.
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Interactive
Community:
Jan 30, 2019
Medicaid helps low-income seniors, children, people with disabilities, and families get needed health care. Medicaid coverage improves families’ financial security by protecting them from medical debt and helping them stay healthy for work. Medicaid coverage also has long-term health, educational, and financial benefits for children. Click on the map to learn more about Medicaid’s contributions to your state.

Authored by: Matt Broaddus for the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
Topics: Child welfare, Health, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 30, 2019

Medicaid Works for Low-Income Families and Individuals in Your State

Interactive
Jan 30, 2019
Matt Broaddus for the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
Medicaid helps low-income seniors, children, people with disabilities, and families get needed health care. Medicaid coverage improves families’ financial security by protecting them from medical debt and helping them stay healthy for work.
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Interactive
Community:
Jan 11, 2019
A new mapping tool can help you learn more about the state of environmental health, wherever you live in Washington.

Authored by: Kamna Shastri for KUOW
Topics: Health, Housing, Pacific Northwest, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 17, 2019
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Interactive
Community:
Jan 1, 2019
A collection of resources that cover public health issues such as dental care, diabetes, vaccines, and nutrition.

Authored by: Mark Barna for The Nation's Health
Topics: Child welfare, Health, Low-income, Safety
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 7, 2019
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Policy Brief
Community:
Health departments provide public health protections in a number of areas, including: preventing the spread of communicable disease, ensuring food, air, and water quality are safe, supporting maternal and child health, improving access to clinical care services, and preventing chronic disease and injury. In addition, public health departments provide local protections and services unique to their community’s needs.

Authored by: The Public Health National Center for Innovations (PHNCI)
Topics: Data sharing, Health, Metrics, Partnerships
Shared by Housing Is on Dec 17, 2018

Building a strong foundation of public health infrastructure.

Policy Brief
The Public Health National Center for Innovations (PHNCI)
Health departments provide public health protections in a number of areas, including: preventing the spread of communicable disease, ensuring food, air, and water quality are safe, supporting maternal and child health, improving access to clinical care services, and preventing chronic disease and in
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Interactive
Community:
The 2018 Purpose Built Conference in Orlando, Florida from October 24 – 26 was a tremendous opportunity for thoughtful engagement and energetic conversations with Network Members and attendees from all across the country. Our panel of guest speakers represented a wide range of industries and brought unique perspectives and insights.

Authored by: Purpose Built Communities
Topics: Community development, Education, Health, Housing, Low-income, Mobility, Partnerships, Place-based
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 5, 2018
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Interactive
Community:
People living just a few blocks apart may have vastly different opportunities to live a long life in part because of their neighborhood. Unfortunately, significant gaps in life expectancy at birth persist across many United States cities, towns, ZIP codes and neighborhoods. The latest estimates of life expectancy at birth reveals differences down to the census tract level. Explore how life expectancy in America compares with life expectancy in your area, and resources to help everyone have the opportunity to live a longer, healthier life.

Authored by: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Topics: Health, Housing, Low-income, Place-based, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 5, 2018
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Policy Brief
Community:
Nov 2, 2018
The new opioid legislation—the Substance Use-Disorder Prevention That Promotes Opioid Recovery and Treatment for Patients and Communities Act (the SUPPORT Act)—signed into law on October 24 includes targeted expansions in treatment, including provisions that provide funding or flexibility to states to expand access to treatment for substance use disorders (SUD), including opioid use disorder (OUD), and health care more generally in Medicaid and Medicare.

Authored by: Eva H. Allen and Lisa Clemans-Cope for The Urban Institute
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Health, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Safety, Substance abuse
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 5, 2018

The new opioid legislation takes important steps toward expanding treatment and coverage

Policy Brief
Nov 2, 2018
Eva H. Allen and Lisa Clemans-Cope for The Urban Institute
The new opioid legislation—the Substance Use-Disorder Prevention That Promotes Opioid Recovery and Treatment for Patients and Communities Act (the SUPPORT Act)—signed into law on October 24 includes targeted expansions in treatment, including provisions that provide funding or flexibility to states
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Interactive
Community:
Nov 5, 2018
Content for this app was developed specifically for middle schoolers and educates them on the principles of a healthy home in a preteen-friendly format. Navigation is simple and intuitive. Interactive features include the Train the Brain and the ability to save a list of items found in their home. Colorful graphics highlight many different hazards that can occur in homes, such as lead, mold and moisture, pests, and more.

Authored by: HUD
Topics: Child welfare, Health, Healthy homes, Housing, Lead, Low-income, Place-based, Safety, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 5, 2018

Healthy Homes App

Interactive
Nov 5, 2018
HUD
Content for this app was developed specifically for middle schoolers and educates them on the principles of a healthy home in a preteen-friendly format. Navigation is simple and intuitive. Interactive features include the Train the Brain and the ability to save a list of items found in their home.
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Policy Brief
Community:
Nov 2, 2018
More than 56 million people live in communities that are classified as high opportunity areas. These neighborhoods often provide access to certain amenities or community attributes that are believed to increase economic mobility for their residents. However, they are also often encumbered by high costs of living and dense populations. As a result, the supply of affordable housing is unable to support the demand. In an effort to combat this, there has been an increased focus from research, policy and affordable housing groups on deconcentrating poverty and promoting affordable housing in high opportunity areas.

Authored by: Freddie Mac Multifamily: Duty to Serve
Topics: Education, Health, Housing, Low-income, Mobility, Safety
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 2, 2018

Spotlight on Underserved Markets: Affordable Housing in High Opportunity Areas

Policy Brief
Nov 2, 2018
Freddie Mac Multifamily: Duty to Serve
More than 56 million people live in communities that are classified as high opportunity areas. These neighborhoods often provide access to certain amenities or community attributes that are believed to increase economic mobility for their residents.
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Interactive
Community:
Which neighborhoods in America offer children the best chance to rise out of poverty? The Opportunity Atlas answers this question using anonymous data following 20 million Americans from childhood to their mid-30s. Now you can trace the roots of today's affluence and poverty back to the neighborhoods where people grew up. See where and for whom opportunity has been missing, and develop local solutions to help more children rise out of poverty.

Authored by: Census Bureau, Harvard University, and Brown University
Topics: Asset building, Child welfare, Dual-generation, Early childhood, Education, Health, Housing, Low-income, Mobility, Stability, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Oct 12, 2018

The Opportunity Atlas

Interactive
Census Bureau, Harvard University, and Brown University
Which neighborhoods in America offer children the best chance to rise out of poverty? The Opportunity Atlas answers this question using anonymous data following 20 million Americans from childhood to their mid-30s.
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Interactive
Community:
This initiative is generating innovative ideas that will help us address the affordable housing crisis in America and further support our broad mission to create housing opportunities that are safe, sustainable, and affordable, while managing risk to protect lenders, homeowners, and taxpayers. Specifically, The Challenge is a $10 million commitment by Fannie Mae to generate affordable housing solutions that will help Fannie Mae address the nation’s affordable housing issues by advancing sustainable communities–those providing residents integrated opportunities for employment, health and wellness, and education.

Authored by: Fannie Mae
Topics: Education, Funding, Health, Housing, Low-income, Workforce development
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Oct 10, 2018