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Elements of a Successful Partnership

With generous support from the MacArthur Foundation, CLPHA developed an in-depth report on regional housing-education collaborations taking place at housing authorities across the Pacific-Northwest.

Read the Multimedia Report
 

National Snapshot of PHA-Health Partnerships

The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) provides new data about public housing authorities’ partnerships with the health sector and offers recommendations to encourage collaboration between these affordable housing providers and their health system partners.

Read the Report
 
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Research
Community:
Aug 5, 2019
CLPHA developed a general data sharing template that public housing authorities (PHAs) and their health partners can customize to suit their data sharing and collaboration needs. Please feel free to comment to share any uses/modifications your organization made to implement into a partnership.

Authored by:
Topics: Affordable Care Act, CLPHA, Community development, Cost effectiveness, Data sharing, Dental, Depression, Dual-eligibles, Funding, Health, Healthy homes, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Mental health, Metrics, MTW, Nutrition, Obesity, Partnerships, Place-based, Preventative care, Racial inequalities, Research, SAMHSA, Smoke-free, Stability, Substance abuse, Supportive housing, Sustainability, TA
Shared by Steve Lucas on Aug 5, 2019

CLPHA Data Sharing Template for PHAs and Health Organizations

 

Disclaimer: This template is provided for informational purposes only and not for the purpose of providing legal advice. You should contact your attorney to obtain advice with respect to any particular issue or question. Use of this template, including its exhibits and attachments, does not create a relationship or any responsibilities between CLPHA and the user.

Research
Aug 5, 2019
CLPHA developed a general data sharing template that public housing authorities (PHAs) and their health partners can customize to suit their data sharing and collaboration needs. Please feel free to comment to share any uses/modifications your organization made to implement into a partnership.
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Research
Community:
Apr 29, 2019
When following the mother–child pair from pregnancy through five years postpartum, the estimated cost is $14.2 billion for births in 2017, or an average of $32,000 for every mother–child pair affected but not treated.

Authored by: Mathematica
Topics: Dual-generation, Early childhood, Mental health, Pre-natal, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 30, 2019
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Research
Community:
Apr 1, 2019
Serious mental illness (SMI) is a disabling condition that develops early in life and imposes substantial economic burden. There is a growing belief that early intervention for SMI has lifelong benefits for patients. However, assessing the cost-effectiveness of early intervention efforts is hampered by a lack of evidence on the long-term benefits. We addressed this by using a dynamic microsimulation model to estimate the lifetime burden of SMI for those diagnosed by age twenty-five.

Authored by: Health Affairs
Topics: Disabilities, Education, Low-income, Mental health, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 23, 2019

Measuring The Lifetime Costs of Serious Mental Illness And The Mitigating Effects of Educational Attainment

Research
Apr 1, 2019
Health Affairs
Serious mental illness (SMI) is a disabling condition that develops early in life and imposes substantial economic burden. There is a growing belief that early intervention for SMI has lifelong benefits for patients.
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Research
Community:
Mar 28, 2019
Federal safety net programs are intended to protect the most vulnerable Americans—such as the elderly, people with severe disabilities and young children. Housing assistance plays a critical role in the safety net, providing decent, safe, and affordable housing for millions of extremely low-income and vulnerable families—though, because it is not an entitlement like other federal safety net programs, the assistance available falls far short of the need. Housing subsidies free families to spend on other essentials like healthy food, education, and health care.

Authored by: Susan J. Popkin for Journal of Housing & Community Development
Topics: Asset building, Dual-generation, Education, Housing, Mental health, Mobility, Partnerships, Research, Workforce development
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 2, 2019
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Research
Community:
Jan 1, 2019
Homelessness during pregnancy poses significant health risks for mothers and infants. As health care providers increase their emphasis on social determinants of health, it is important to understand how unstable housing contributes to complications during pregnancy. We linked data about emergency shelter enrollees with Massachusetts Medicaid claims for the period January 1, 2008–June 30, 2015 to compare health care use and pregnancy complications for 9,124 women who used emergency shelter with those for 8,757 similar women who did not. Rates of mental illness and substance use disorders were significantly higher among homeless women. Adjusted odds of having nine pregnancy complications were also significantly higher for homeless women and remained substantially unchanged after we adjusted for behavioral health disorders.

Authored by: Robin Clark, Linda Weinreb, Julie Flahive, and Robert Seifert for Health Affairs
Topics: Child welfare, Depression, Early childhood, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Mental health, Pre-natal, Research, Substance abuse
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 26, 2019

Homelessness Contributes To Pregnancy Complications

Research
Jan 1, 2019
Robin Clark, Linda Weinreb, Julie Flahive, and Robert Seifert for Health Affairs
Homelessness during pregnancy poses significant health risks for mothers and infants. As health care providers increase their emphasis on social determinants of health, it is important to understand how unstable housing contributes to complications during pregnancy.
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Research
Community:
Jan 31, 2019
Because mental health conditions can negatively affect employment, people with these conditions make up a large share of federal disability program participants. Federal agencies have tested supported employment (SE) interventions designed to help those with mental health conditions keep or obtain employment and reduce their dependence on public programs. This brief describes the characteristics of adults with mental health conditions who participate in the federal disability programs and reports evidence from three recent studies of longer-term impacts of SE on the employment of people with mental health conditions. The findings indicate that, although a large share of disability program participants with mental health conditions report that they want to work, many face barriers, including being discouraged by failed past work attempts.

Authored by: Mathematica Policy Research
Topics: Asset building, Disabilities, Mental health, Research, Workforce development
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 18, 2019
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Research
Community:
Jul 21, 2018
A new study measured the mental health of Philadelphia residents before and after blighted lots had been converted into green spaces.

Authored by: Melissa Breyer for treehugger
Topics: Community development, Health, Mental health, Place-based, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 11, 2019
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Research
Community:
Nov 22, 2018
Improved access to health insurance contributed to reducing worry and stress associated with paying rent/mortgage or purchasing meals among low-income people. Expanding health insurance access may have contributed to increasing the disposable income of low income groups.

Authored by: Shiho Kino, Koryu Sato, and Iciro Kawachi for International Journal for Equity in Health
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Health, Housing, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Mental health, Research, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Mar 7, 2019

Spillover benefit of improved access to healthcare on reducing worry about housing and meal affordability

Research
Nov 22, 2018
Shiho Kino, Koryu Sato, and Iciro Kawachi for International Journal for Equity in Health
Improved access to health insurance contributed to reducing worry and stress associated with paying rent/mortgage or purchasing meals among low-income people. Expanding health insurance access may have contributed to increasing the disposable income of low income groups.
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Research
Community:
Nov 1, 2018
In this study, researchers conduct a literature review across public health, environmental health, medical, sociology, and urban planning journals to synthesize the research on the mental health effects of rat infestations on residents living in urban neighborhoods.

Authored by: Kaylee Byers, Chelsea G. Himsworth, and Raymond Lam for The Journal of Environmental Health
Topics: Health, Housing, Low-income, Mental health, Research, Safety
Shared by Housing Is on Feb 28, 2019

The Mental Health Consequences of Rat Exposure

Research
Nov 1, 2018
Kaylee Byers, Chelsea G. Himsworth, and Raymond Lam for The Journal of Environmental Health
In this study, researchers conduct a literature review across public health, environmental health, medical, sociology, and urban planning journals to synthesize the research on the mental health effects of rat infestations on residents living in urban neighborhoods.
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Research
Community:
Feb 6, 2019
Research suggests that living in concentrated poverty is harmful to health, well-being, and economic mobility. Inclusionary zoning can break up poverty density by imposing legal requirements to create affordable housing across neighborhoods. In Montgomery County, Maryland, inclusionary zoning laws require developers to set aside 12 to 15 percent of new homes at below-market rates and allow the public housing authority to purchase a portion of these units. As a result, two-thirds of public housing residents in Montgomery County live in economically diverse, low-poverty neighborhoods. To assess the effects of these unique conditions, researchers explored how public housing residents’ social networks, neighborhood perceptions, and health outcomes differ based on their placement in mixed-income communities or traditionally clustered public housing.

Authored by: Heather Schwartz, Susan Burkhauser, Beth Ann Griffin, David Kennedy, Harold Green Jr., Alene Kennedy-Hendricks, and Craig Pollack for Housing Policy Debate, How Housing Matters
Topics: Community development, Housing, Mental health, Place-based, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Feb 7, 2019

Inclusionary Zoning Can Improve Outcomes for Public Housing Residents

Research
Feb 6, 2019
Heather Schwartz, Susan Burkhauser, Beth Ann Griffin, David Kennedy, Harold Green Jr., Alene Kennedy-Hendricks, and Craig Pollack for Housing Policy Debate, How Housing Matters
Research suggests that living in concentrated poverty is harmful to health, well-being, and economic mobility. Inclusionary zoning can break up poverty density by imposing legal requirements to create affordable housing across neighborhoods.
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Research
Community:
Mar 1, 2018
Medicaid coverage reduced the prevalence of undiagnosed depression by almost 50% and untreated depression by more than 60%. It increased use of medications and reduced the share of respondents reporting unmet mental health care needs by almost 40%.

Authored by: Katherine Baicker, Heidi Allen, Bill Wright, Sarah Taubman, and Amy Finkelstein for Milbank Memorial Fund
Topics: Depression, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Mental health, Metrics, Pacific Northwest, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 24, 2019

The Effect of Medicaid on Management of Depression: Evidence From the Oregon Health Insurance Experiment

Research
Mar 1, 2018
Katherine Baicker, Heidi Allen, Bill Wright, Sarah Taubman, and Amy Finkelstein for Milbank Memorial Fund
Medicaid coverage reduced the prevalence of undiagnosed depression by almost 50% and untreated depression by more than 60%. It increased use of medications and reduced the share of respondents reporting unmet mental health care needs by almost 40%.
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Research
Community:
Dec 5, 2018
How does the quality of where we live affect our children’s development? The impact of housing and neighborhood quality on physical health has long been studied in the public health field, but studies that aim to assess those same impacts on mental health are less common. This study examined the relationship between the physical quality of housing and neighborhoods and their interactive effect on the mental health and motivation of children from elementary school through young adulthood.

Authored by: Journal of Environmental Psychology
Topics: Child welfare, Community development, Housing, Low-income, Mental health, Racial inequalities, Research, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 6, 2018

How Housing and Neighborhood Quality Affect Children's Mental Health

Research
Dec 5, 2018
Journal of Environmental Psychology
How does the quality of where we live affect our children’s development? The impact of housing and neighborhood quality on physical health has long been studied in the public health field, but studies that aim to assess those same impacts on mental health are less common.
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Research
Community:
Sep 17, 2018
The study finds three out of five adults across the U.S. had at least one adverse experience in their childhood, such as divorce, a parent's death, physical or emotional abuse, or a family member's incarceration or substance abuse problem. A quarter of adults have at least three such experiences in childhood, which – according to other research — increases their risk for most common chronic diseases, from heart disease and cancer to depression and substance abuse.

Authored by: Tara Haelle for NPR
Topics: Child welfare, Depression, Early childhood, Low-income, Mental health, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 18, 2018
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Research
Community:
Aug 9, 2018
For almost two decades now, cities around the country have been demolishing traditional public housing and relocating residents to subsidized private market rental housing. In this paper, we examine sense of place, consisting of both community and place attachment, among a sample of Atlanta public housing residents prior to relocation.

Authored by:
Topics: Asset building, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Mental health, Mobility, Research, South, Stability
Shared by Housing Is on Aug 9, 2018
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Research
Community:
Aug 1, 2018
We examined the impact of long-term (6 months or more) vacant housing and various durations of vacancy on a variety of health outcomes at the neighborhood level across three types of U.S. metropolitan areas (metros): (1) those that have experienced consistently strong growth, (2) those that have undergone weak growth, and (3) those hit hardest by the foreclosure crisis

Authored by:
Topics: Asset building, Asthma, Community development, Health, Housing, Low-income, Mental health, Metrics, Research, Safety, Transportation
Shared by Housing Is on Aug 1, 2018
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Research
Community:
Aug 1, 2018
This study draws on qualitative interview data to examine transitions into rent-assisted housing as they relate to diabetes self-management behaviors.

Authored by:
Topics: East Coast, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Mental health, Metrics, Nutrition, Research, Stability
Shared by Housing Is on Aug 1, 2018
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Research
Community:
Aug 1, 2018
Work requirements in public housing are highly controversial, and little is known about their impacts. We examined how implementation of a work requirement paired with supportive services by Charlotte Housing Authority has impacted residents’ overall well-being. Although the policy might improve well-being by increasing household income, it might also engender stress through greater housing precarity.

Authored by:
Topics: Depression, Disabilities, Education, Food insecurity, Health, Housing, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Mental health, Metrics, MTW, Partnerships, Racial inequalities, Research, South, Workforce development
Shared by Housing Is on Aug 1, 2018
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Research
Community:
Aug 1, 2018
We examine the implementation of a community health worker (CHW) program in subsidized housing, describe needs identified and priorities set by residents, and summarize participant-reported outcomes.

Authored by:
Topics: East Coast, Health, Housing, Low-income, Mental health, Metrics, Partnerships, Place-based, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Aug 1, 2018
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Research
Community:
Jul 27, 2018
The purpose of this paper is to investigate the association between public housing and health conditions: specifically, we ask if residents entered public housing already ill or if public housing may cause the poor health of its residents.

Authored by:
Topics: Health, Housing, Low-income, Mental health, Metrics, Mobility, Nutrition, Racial inequalities, Research, South
Shared by Housing Is on Jul 27, 2018
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Research
Community:
Jul 23, 2018
Supportive housing programs are proposed as a way of increasing housing access and stability for the chronically homeless, improving access to needed services, and decreasing vulnerability to HIV and other diseases. Little is known about residents’ understandings of and experiences with different models of supportive housing and how they fit within residents’ broader strategies to maintain housing. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 23 residents and 10 service providers from nine different supportive housing programs in Hartford, Connecticut. Data analysis explored residents’ perceptions of and experiences with supportive housing programs in the context of strategies to access resources and receive emotional, financial, and other forms of support.

Authored by:
Topics: East Coast, Homelessness, Housing, Mental health, Place-based, Research, Substance abuse, Supportive housing
Shared by Housing Is on Jul 23, 2018
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Research
Community:
Jul 23, 2018
To what extent does a change of address and transformation of the surrounding environment translate into a reduced sense of stigmatization of public housing residents? This article explores this question. Drawing from research at three new, mixed-income developments in Chicago, we examine changes in the regulatory and social environment and the perspectives and experiences of public housing residents living there. We find that although some forms of perceived stigma may have been ameliorated in these new settings, in other ways stigma and isolation has intensified.

Authored by:
Topics: Housing, Low-income, Mental health, Midwest, Mobility, Racial inequalities, Research, Safety
Shared by Housing Is on Jul 23, 2018

The New Stigma of Relocated Public Housing Residents: Challenges to Social Identity in Mixed-Income Developments

Research
Jul 23, 2018
To what extent does a change of address and transformation of the surrounding environment translate into a reduced sense of stigmatization of public housing residents? This article explores this question.
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Research
Community:
Jul 20, 2018
Despite the fact that people invest more financial, temporal, and psychological resources in their homes than in any other material entity, research on housing and mental health is remarkably underdeveloped. We critically review existing research on housing and mental health, considering housing type (e.g., singlefamily detached versus multiple dwelling), floor level, and housing quality (e.g., structural damage). We then discuss methodological and conceptual shortcomings of this literature and provide a theoretical framework for future research on housing quality and mental health.

Authored by:
Topics: Depression, Health, Housing, Mental health, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Jul 20, 2018
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Research
Community:
Jul 18, 2018
We examined whether receiving housing assistance is associated with improved health and well-being using a nationally representative sample of the US population. Specifically, we examined whether entry into housing assistance was associated with better reported health or reduced psychological distress relative to awaiting admission and whether there were differential effects associated with the 3 primary program categories: public housing, housing choice vouchers, and multifamily housing. Furthermore, we explored whether the health effects of housing assistance are mediated by neighborhood characteristics.

Authored by:
Topics: Health, Housing, Low-income, Mental health, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Jul 18, 2018
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Research
Community:
Jul 11, 2018
Studies show that those residing in households subsidized with federal housing vouchers exhibit fewer mental health problems than residents of public housing. The role of housing conditions and neighborhood quality in this relationship is unclear. This study investigated the relationship between rental assistance, housing and neighborhood conditions, and the risk of depressive symptomology and hostile affect among low-income Latino adults living in the Bronx, NY

Authored by:
Topics: Depression, East Coast, Health, Housing, Low-income, Mental health, Obesity, Racial inequalities, Research, Stability
Shared by Housing Is on Jul 11, 2018

Depressive Symptomology and Hostile Affect among Latinos Using Housing Rental Assistance: the AHOME Study

Research
Jul 11, 2018
Studies show that those residing in households subsidized with federal housing vouchers exhibit fewer mental health problems than residents of public housing. The role of housing conditions and neighborhood quality in this relationship is unclear.
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Research
Community:
Jul 11, 2018
A Research Review and Comment on Future Directions for Integrating Housing and Health Services

Authored by:
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Cost effectiveness, Data sharing, Exercise, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Mental health, Metrics, Nutrition, Obesity, Partnerships, Preventative care, Research, Supportive housing
Shared by Housing Is on Jul 11, 2018