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Housing Is Working Group 2022-2023 Calendar

Join the Housing Is Working Group to discuss special topics related to cross-sector initiatives and programmatic considerations particularly focused on the intersections of housing, health, and education.

This year’s public webinars cover topics such as environmental resiliency, Medicaid redetermination, and digital equity!

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Elements of a Successful Partnership

With generous support from the MacArthur Foundation, CLPHA developed an in-depth report on regional housing-education collaborations taking place at housing authorities across the Pacific-Northwest.

Read the Multimedia Report
 
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Video
Community:
Jun 17, 2022
The Low Income Investment Fund (LIIF) will moderate a unique cross-sector panel of housing and early care and education (ECE) experts on strategies and best practices for co-locating ECE facilities within affordable housing developments. Discussion of specific financing techniques and site design considerations from existing co-located facilities will provide attendees lessons on policy and programmatic changes needed to incentivize co-location. Panelists include innovators in affordable housing development, government and public sectors, early care and education operations, and community development finance.

Authored by:
Topics: Advocacy, Broadband, Child welfare, CLPHA, Family engagement, Food insecurity, Health, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Nutrition, School-readiness, Supportive housing, Sustainability
Shared by Karina George on Jun 17, 2022

CLPHA Housing Is Summit 2022: Meeting Families' Needs Including Child Care in Housing Developments

Video
Jun 17, 2022
The Low Income Investment Fund (LIIF) will moderate a unique cross-sector panel of housing and early care and education (ECE) experts on strategies and best practices for co-locating ECE facilities within affordable housing developments.
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Policy Brief
Community:
Dec 4, 2019
In California, more than 3.7 million students were eligible for free or reduced priced school meals in the 2017-2018 school year. For many of those students, school meals are the primary source of regular access to healthy food. When the bell rings at 3:00 or lets out for summer break, many of those students go home to nutritional uncertainty or high-calorie, low-nutrient foods. For many low-income families, the out-of-school-time food access gap increases family stress: limited budgets are stretched further to cover food, rent, utilities, transportation, medications, and chidcare costs. For very young children, food insecurity can negatively impact brain and physical development. For children of all ages, disrupted access to healthy food can impact behavior, increase risk of obesity, make it harder to concentrate, or exacerbate existing healthy conditions like type 2 diabetes. The impact is not limited to summer, and can lead to a rocky start to the school year, negatively impacting school attendance and students’ ability to effectively participate in school. Read the full brief to learn how public and affordable housing communities can address food insecurity for children and youth with the help of out-of-school-time USDA child nutrition programs.

Authored by:
Topics: Advocacy, Early childhood, Food insecurity, Health, Healthy homes, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Nutrition, Out-of-school time, West Coast, Youth
Shared by Linda Lu on Dec 4, 2019

Keeping Kids Healthy and Engaged When School is Out Through Public and Affordable Housing Communities

Policy Brief
Dec 4, 2019
In California, more than 3.7 million students were eligible for free or reduced priced school meals in the 2017-2018 school year. For many of those students, school meals are the primary source of regular access to healthy food.
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Video
Community:
Feb 20, 2019
With the active support of their residents, HABG converted a 34-passenger bus donated by Warren County Public Schools. The new mobile grocery store will offer fresh fruits and vegetables to families who currently live in a 'food desert' where the cost of eating healthy can be beyond their reach. HAGB's new mobile grocery store will visit public housing developments and other low-income neighborhoods in Bowling Green to help residents lower their food costs by offering affordable groceries, including fresh produce grown at HAGB. More than 90 residents were surveyed and almost everyone said they would use the mobile grocery store at least once weekly.

Authored by: Housing Authority of Bowling Green
Topics: Food insecurity, Health, Housing, Low-income, Nutrition, Place-based
Shared by Housing Is on Feb 28, 2019
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Policy Brief
Community:
Jan 30, 2019
Under the continuing resolution (CR) that provided the funding to reopen the government for three weeks, SNAP (food stamps) now is fully funded at least through March, even if the government shuts down again on February 15. Millions of families, however, face a longer-than-usual gap between their February and March benefits because the Agriculture Department worked with states to issue February benefits early during the shutdown, and that could further strain household budgets, the emergency food network, and other community resources.

Authored by: Dottie Rensbaum for The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
Topics: Food insecurity, Funding, Health, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Nutrition
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 30, 2019

SNAP Can Cover Full Benefits Through March, But Participants Face Big Gaps Between February and March Benefits

Policy Brief
Jan 30, 2019
Dottie Rensbaum for The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
Under the continuing resolution (CR) that provided the funding to reopen the government for three weeks, SNAP (food stamps) now is fully funded at least through March, even if the government shuts down again on February 15.