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Housing Is Working Group 2022-2023 Calendar

Join the Housing Is Working Group to discuss special topics related to cross-sector initiatives and programmatic considerations particularly focused on the intersections of housing, health, and education.

This year’s public webinars cover topics such as environmental resiliency, Medicaid redetermination, and digital equity!

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Elements of a Successful Partnership

With generous support from the MacArthur Foundation, CLPHA developed an in-depth report on regional housing-education collaborations taking place at housing authorities across the Pacific-Northwest.

Read the Multimedia Report
 
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News Article
Community:
Jan 16, 2019
Nearly 60 percent of Oklahoma K-12 kids qualify for free and reduced lunches at school. It's a meal they can rely on during the most of the year, but when summer comes around the meal often goes away. The Summer Food Service Program helps fix that problem in much of the state, but not all of it.

Authored by: Mitchell Willetts for Enid News & Eagle
Topics: Child welfare, Food insecurity, Low-income, Midwest
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 22, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Jan 6, 2019
These programs, available at 10 Wichita middle and high schools so far, include extended serving times in cafeterias, grab-and-go breakfasts from carts or kiosks, and “second-chance breakfast,” in which students are offered breakfast after homeroom or first period.

Authored by: Suzanne Perez Tobias for The Wichita Eagle
Topics: Child welfare, Education, Food insecurity, Health, Low-income, Midwest, Nutrition, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 16, 2019

Lots of kids start the school day hungry. Here's how Wichita is trying to help

News Article
Jan 6, 2019
Suzanne Perez Tobias for The Wichita Eagle
These programs, available at 10 Wichita middle and high schools so far, include extended serving times in cafeterias, grab-and-go breakfasts from carts or kiosks, and “second-chance breakfast,” in which students are offered breakfast after homeroom or first period.
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News Article
Community:
Sep 21, 2018
A children’s hospital in Columbus, Ohio, is trying to treat a difficult patient: Its own struggling neighborhood.

Authored by: Laura Bliss for CityLab
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Child welfare, Health, Housing, Low-income, Midwest, Partnerships
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Sep 25, 2018
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News Article
Community:
May 25, 2018
Community organizations are improving health equity by tackling the cycle of poverty in urban neighborhoods.

Authored by: Jacqui Cook
Topics: Asthma, Child welfare, Community development, Early childhood, Exercise, Family engagement, Health, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Midwest, Nutrition, Obesity, Out-of-school time, Partnerships, Preventative care, Racial inequalities, Research, Safety, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Jul 11, 2018
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News Article
Community:
Jan 29, 2018
Chicago’s troubling homicide rate could be significantly reduced through a massive increase in state spending for Chicago schools.

Authored by: Larry Yellen for Fox 32
Topics: Child welfare, Community development, Cost effectiveness, Education, Funding, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Midwest, Research, Safety, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Jul 5, 2018
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News Article
Community:
Jul 3, 2018
Researchers have shown — and teachers know — that schoolchildren exposed to neighborhood violence can have a tougher time learning, experiencing more stress and depression than their peers growing up in safe neighborhoods. But a Johns Hopkins University sociologist discovered that the consequences of neighborhood violence reach further than previously known, even spilling over to students who come from safe neighborhoods. Using crime and student data from Chicago, Julia Burdick-Will linked exposure to neighborhood violence to a drop in test scores, an effect that extended to students coming from communities that experienced little or no violence.

Authored by: Moriah Balingit for The Washington Post
Topics: Attendance, Child welfare, Community development, Depression, Education, Health, Low-income, Mental health, Midwest, Out-of-school time, Post-secondary, Racial inequalities, Research, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jul 3, 2018

What happens when schoolchildren live in violent neighborhoods? The effects are broader than previously known, a study finds.

News Article
Jul 3, 2018
Moriah Balingit for The Washington Post
Researchers have shown — and teachers know — that schoolchildren exposed to neighborhood violence can have a tougher time learning, experiencing more stress and depression than their peers growing up in safe neighborhoods.