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Elements of a Successful Partnership

With generous support from the MacArthur Foundation, CLPHA developed an in-depth report on regional housing-education collaborations taking place at housing authorities across the Pacific-Northwest.

Read the Multimedia Report
 

National Snapshot of PHA-Health Partnerships

The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) provides new data about public housing authorities’ partnerships with the health sector and offers recommendations to encourage collaboration between these affordable housing providers and their health system partners.

Read the Report
 
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News Article
Community: Youth
Feb 1, 2018
Chicago’s troubling homicide rate could be significantly reduced through a massive increase in state spending for Chicago schools. That's just one of the proposals floated Monday by a prominent University of Chicago economist Jens Ludwig. With a substantial commitment, he says homicides could be reduced by nearly 60 percent. Illinois is dead last when it comes to the percentage of education dollars provided by the state to its cities. Ludwig believes adding $1.7 billion dollars would not only bring Illinois up to the national average, but could substantially reduce gun violence as well. Given the social science evidence on the link between high school graduation and gun violence, that would be about a 30 percent decrease in the homicide rates in the city of Chicago for something that has absolutely nothing to do with the city of Chicago policies.

Authored by: FOX 32 CHICAGO
Topics: Child welfare, Community development, Education, Funding, Legislation & Policy, Preventative care, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Oct 15, 2020
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News Article
Community: Youth
Jun 29, 2017
One Summer Chicago Plus is a jobs program designed to reduce violence and prepare youth living in some of the city’s highest-violence neighborhoods for the labor market. This study was carried out over the summer of 2013 in partnership with the Chicago Department of Family and Support Services. It found that the program, which provided a six-week, minimum-wage job for 25 hours a week, reduced the number of violent-crime arrests for participants by 33 percent over the subsequent year. The One Summer Chicago Plus 2013 study—accompanied by a long-term follow-up of the 2012 program—closely examines the two to three years following the six-week program and finds that the reduction in violent-crime arrests is not driven simply by keeping participants off the streets during the summer. In fact, the decline in violence remains significant when the summer is ignored entirely. Researchers did find, however, that the program had no significant impacts on schooling outcomes or engagement, nor did it have a positive impact on formal labor sector employment for all of the participants after the fact. The authors do note that it is possible that significant labor market effects will develop past the three-year window examined in the study.

Authored by: UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO URBAN LABS
Topics: Child welfare, Community development, Criminal justice, Out-of-school time, Partnerships, Preventative care, Safety, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Oct 15, 2020

Chicago jobs program reduces youth violence, Urban Labs study shows

News Article
Jun 29, 2017
UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO URBAN LABS
One Summer Chicago Plus is a jobs program designed to reduce violence and prepare youth living in some of the city’s highest-violence neighborhoods for the labor market. This study was carried out over the summer of 2013 in partnership with the Chicago Department of Family and Support Services.
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News Article
Community:
Jun 4, 2019
A new study finds that higher percentages of wealthy, Asian, and white residents live in HOAs; and people pay a premium of about 4 percent for homes in HOAs.

Authored by: David Montgomery for CityLab
Topics: Community development, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Jun 6, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Apr 26, 2019
In the District of Columbia, low-income residents are being pushed out of neighborhoods at some of the highest rates in the country, according to the Institute on Metropolitan Opportunity, which sought to track demographic and economic changes in neighborhoods in the 50 largest U.S. cities from 2000 to 2016.

Authored by: Marissa J. Lang for The Washington Post
Topics: Community development, Housing, Low-income, Racial inequalities
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 26, 2019

Gentrification in D.C. means widespread displacement, bucking national trends, report says

News Article
Apr 26, 2019
Marissa J. Lang for The Washington Post
In the District of Columbia, low-income residents are being pushed out of neighborhoods at some of the highest rates in the country, according to the Institute on Metropolitan Opportunity, which sought to track demographic and economic changes in neighborhoods in the 50 largest U.S.
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News Article
Community:
Apr 16, 2019
ProMedica and LISC team up to fund place-based investments in the hope of improving residents’ health. How do they do it?

Authored by: Amanda Abrams for Shelter Force
Topics: Community development, Health, Housing, Place-based
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 23, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Apr 7, 2019
Puerto Rico was in financial distress and had crumbling infrastructure before Hurricane Maria, and many residents complain of government malfeasance that exacerbated the storm’s impact, echoing criticism from Washington. But Puerto Rican leaders say the delay to the Vieques hospital and thousands of other stalled projects is a reflection of unequal treatment from the White House and Congress, which last week failed to pass disaster relief legislation because of a dispute over how much money to send the island.

Authored by: Patricia Mazzei for The New York Times
Topics: Community development, Food insecurity, Funding, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Nutrition, U.S. Territories
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 15, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Feb 5, 2019
Building more affordable housing units in the metros that are centers of innovation will increase demand for the wares that fill houses, and increase productivity.

Authored by: Richard Floriday for City Lab
Topics: Asset building, Community development, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 4, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Mar 31, 2019
Miami is projected to face anywhere from 1 to 3 feet of sea level rise by 2060, and as sea levels rise, higher ground inland has started to look more and more desirable. Much of that higher ground is in the city's poorest neighborhoods, like Liberty City and Little Haiti. The shifting real estate landscape is just one example of how, in Miami, the effects of global warming are not hypothetical predictions but realities of everyday life, prompting action by government, businesses and individuals alike. Across the region, developers are changing how they build, wealthy homeowners are reinforcing their properties, and in communities that are farther from the coast — places like Liberty City — residents are working to make sure they don't have to leave their homes.

Authored by: Ian Stewart and Lulu Garcia-Navarro for NPR
Topics: Community development, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Racial inequalities, South
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 4, 2019

Building For An Uncertain Future: Miami Residents Adapt To The Changing Climate

News Article
Mar 31, 2019
Ian Stewart and Lulu Garcia-Navarro for NPR
Miami is projected to face anywhere from 1 to 3 feet of sea level rise by 2060, and as sea levels rise, higher ground inland has started to look more and more desirable. Much of that higher ground is in the city's poorest neighborhoods, like Liberty City and Little Haiti.
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News Article
Community:
Mar 27, 2019
A shortage of affordable housing on this island territory has forced hundreds of families to remain in damaged and leaky houses during the lengthy recovery effort. The widespread destruction of hotels and public housing, combined with the flood of workers who have rushed to the islands to aid in rebuilding, have pushed rents higher, beyond the means of many disaster victims.

Authored by: Tim Craig for The Washington Post
Topics: Community development, Housing, Low-income, Safety, U.S. Territories
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 2, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Mar 26, 2019
Community First! Village is built and run by the nonprofit Mobile Loaves & Fishes to lift the most chronically homeless off the streets and into a place they can call home. They live in about 100 RVs and 125 micro homes arranged on streets with names like "Peaceful Path" and "Goodness Way." Heavy machinery has broken ground on the neighboring 24 acres to add another 310 housing units. When complete, Mobile Loaves and Fishes believes it will be able to provide permanent homes for approximately 40% of the chronically homeless in Austin.

Authored by: Christopher Dawson for CNN
Topics: Community development, Homelessness, Housing, Place-based, South
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 28, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Mar 18, 2019
Taller buildings in the hearts of more than two dozen neighborhoods, denser housing on some nearby blocks and requirements that developers help create affordable housing. That’s what Seattle is getting after the City Council voted unanimously Monday to approve some of the most sweeping zoning changes in the city’s recent history.

Authored by: Daniel Beekman for The Seattle Times
Topics: Community development, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Mar 26, 2019
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Community:
Mar 15, 2019
Although such a complex problem such as lack of affordable housing demands numerous solutions, modular construction looks promising, barreling toward a tipping point with a new generation of startups bringing a manufacturing mindset to multifamily construction.

Authored by: Matt Alderton for Arch Daily
Topics: Community development, Cost effectiveness, Housing, Low-income
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 15, 2019

How Modular Construction Could Offer a Lasting Solution in the Affordable Housing Crisis

News Article
Mar 15, 2019
Matt Alderton for Arch Daily
Although such a complex problem such as lack of affordable housing demands numerous solutions, modular construction looks promising, barreling toward a tipping point with a new generation of startups bringing a manufacturing mindset to multifamily construction.
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Community:
Mar 12, 2019
Kaiser is investing $200 million in low-interest loans for affordable housing nationwide. This may be part of a growing national trend of health maintenance organizations investing in housing to improve community health. In Phoenix, United Healthcare lent money to a community development corporation, Chicanos Por La Causa, to purchase apartment complexes for Medicaid recipients. In Chicago, the University of Illinois Hospital helps to find permanent housing for homeless people who regularly present at its emergency department.

Authored by: Raquel Maria Dillon for Market Place
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Community development, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Partnerships, West Coast
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Mar 14, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Mar 11, 2019
The housing crisis has given rise to acronyms which define the battle over new developments: "Yes in My Backyard" (YIMBYs) vs. “Not In My Backyard" (NIMBYs). And now there's a new acronym: PHIMBY, as in "Public Housing in My Backyard."

Authored by: Jessica Placzek for KQED
Topics: Community development, Housing, Legislation & Policy, West Coast
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 11, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Feb 28, 2019
Over the past decade, the real estate fortunes for African Americans have reversed course. Despite a strengthening economy, including record low unemployment and higher wages for black workers, homeownership levels for that group have dropped incrementally almost every year since 2004. It fell to 43 percent in 2017, virtually erasing all of the gains made since the passage of the Fair Housing Act in 1968, landmark legislation outlawing housing discrimination.

Authored by: Troy McMullen for The Washington Post
Topics: Asset building, Community development, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Racial inequalities
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 11, 2019

The 'heartbreaking' decrease in black homeownership

News Article
Feb 28, 2019
Troy McMullen for The Washington Post
Over the past decade, the real estate fortunes for African Americans have reversed course. Despite a strengthening economy, including record low unemployment and higher wages for black workers, homeownership levels for that group have dropped incrementally almost every year since 2004.
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News Article
Community:
Mar 5, 2019
Disasters are becoming more common in America. In the early and mid-20th century, fewer than 20 percent of U.S. counties experienced a disaster each year. Today, it's about 50 percent. According to the 2018 National Climate Assessment, climate change is already driving more severe droughts, floods and wildfires in the U.S. And those disasters are expensive. The federal government spends billions of dollars annually helping communities rebuild and prevent future damage. But an NPR investigation has found that across the country, white Americans and those with more wealth often receive more federal dollars after a disaster than do minorities and those with less wealth. Federal aid isn't necessarily allocated to those who need it most; it's allocated according to cost-benefit calculations meant to minimize taxpayer risk.

Authored by: Rebecca Hersher and Robert Benincasa for NPR
Topics: Community development, Funding, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Research, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Mar 7, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Jan 30, 2019
The gas tax hasn’t budged since 1992, and highway trust fund is running on fumes. Could a Green New Deal pushed by Congress be a fix?

Authored by: Laura Bliss for CityLab
Topics: Community development, Funding, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Transportation
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Feb 28, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Feb 4, 2019
Central Ohio’s suburbs have become a target of affordable housing efforts. With the region’s rising housing costs straining people everywhere, developers, advocates and some city leaders are increasingly calling attention to the need for affordable housing to be built in places where it historically hasn’t been.

Authored by: Kevin Stankiewicz for The Columbus Dispatch
Topics: Community development, Housing, Midwest
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Feb 7, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Feb 4, 2019
The U.S. territory needs to urgently tackle issues such as "widespread informal housing" and "the exorbitant amount of abandoned spaces" as it rebuilds after Hurricane Maria.

Authored by: Nicole Acevedo for NBC News
Topics: Community development, Food insecurity, Funding, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Nutrition, Safety, Stability, U.S. Territories
Shared by Housing Is on Feb 4, 2019
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Community:
Jun 11, 2018
At a recent public meeting, Sandra Lee Fewer, a member of the city’s Board of Supervisors, asked acting librarian Michael Lambert to explore whether future library renovations might include affordable housing. Fewer hopes to leverage existing public land to create multi-story facilities that include both libraries and housing.

Authored by: Steve Dubb for NPQ
Topics: Community development, Homelessness, Housing, Literacy, Low-income, Partnerships, Place-based, Research, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 29, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Jan 24, 2019
A new collaboration of San Francisco Bay Area foundations and businesses is raising $540 million to tackle the region’s affordable housing crisis.

Authored by: Affordable Housing Finance
Topics: Community development, Health, Housing, Low-income, Partnerships, Supportive housing, West Coast
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 28, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Jan 22, 2019
Mayors from across the country believe that high housing costs and a lack of well-paying jobs are keeping more people from climbing the social ladder in their cities.

Authored by: Rick Rouan for The Columbus Dispatch
Topics: Community development, Housing, Legislation & Policy
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 24, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Jan 11, 2019
When plans to develop affordable housing units in San Bernadino hit a funding roadblock, Dignity Health committed a $1.2 million bridge loan to help fill the gap. But the health system didn't stop there.

Authored by: Alyia Gaskins for Shelter Force
Topics: Community development, Funding, Health, Housing, Low-income, Partnerships
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 23, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Jan 10, 2019
Island School is one of 247 “community schools” in New York. These are regular public schools, with a twist. They have longer days and longer school years: Island stays open 12 hours a day, six days a week, including spring and winter breaks as well as the summer. A psychologist makes weekly rounds. A dentist comes by regularly. So does an optometrist, and students who need glasses get them free.

Authored by: David L. Kirk for The New York Times
Topics: Community development, Dual-generation, East Coast, Education, Family engagement, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Mental health, Metrics, Partnerships, Stability, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 10, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Dec 14, 2018
Opportunity zones are home to approximately 35 million Americans. It is estimated that the opportunity-zone designation could attract $100 billion in private investment in these areas, which would go a long way to spurring economic development and creating jobs.

Authored by: Ben Carson for The New York Times
Topics: Community development, Legislation & Policy, Partnerships, Place-based, Racial inequalities, RAD
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 17, 2018

Ben Carson: We won't allow forgotten Americans to be left behind. Here's how.

News Article
Dec 14, 2018
Ben Carson for The New York Times
Opportunity zones are home to approximately 35 million Americans. It is estimated that the opportunity-zone designation could attract $100 billion in private investment in these areas, which would go a long way to spurring economic development and creating jobs.