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Housing Is Working Group 2022-2023 Calendar

Join the Housing Is Working Group to discuss special topics related to cross-sector initiatives and programmatic considerations particularly focused on the intersections of housing, health, and education.

This year’s public webinars cover topics such as environmental resiliency, Medicaid redetermination, and digital equity!

View Calendar
 

Elements of a Successful Partnership

With generous support from the MacArthur Foundation, CLPHA developed an in-depth report on regional housing-education collaborations taking place at housing authorities across the Pacific-Northwest.

Read the Multimedia Report
 
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Research
Community:
Jul 19, 2022
This ebook, authored by Next City, explores ways that creative placemaking can expand opportunities for low-income people living in disinvested communities. The journalism Next City has produced for the series “For Whom, By Whom” chronicles how creative placemaking can expand opportunities for low-income people living in disinvested communities. These stories give lie to the false narrative that such neighborhoods are home to violence and deprivation instead of talent, imagination, and solutions. Here are communities that produce incredible feats despite being terminally under-resourced, and despite systemic neglect that has persisted for generations.

Authored by:
Topics: Community development, Mobility, Place-based, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Malcolm Guy on Jul 19, 2022
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Interactive
Community:
Jun 29, 2022
In 2020 we launched a dedicated effort to learn more about legal issues surrounding unaccompanied minors experiencing homelessness. This project was intended to guide both organizations’ ongoing work and advocacy and develop resources to help the field better prevent and end homelessness among minors. This toolkit includes: • Key issues and challenges for minors experiencing homelessness; • Strategies and lessons learned from advocacy for state minor consent to services laws (including questions to consider); • Legal issues and considerations relevant to host homes for minors; • Working towards equity while serving minors; • Child welfare and youth homelessness; and • Additional legal and policy issues.

Authored by: National Network for Youth
Topics: Advocacy, Child welfare, Community development, Education, Foster care, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Racial inequalities, Research, Supportive housing, Sustainability, Youth
Shared by Karina George on Jun 29, 2022

Toolkit: Overcoming Legal and Policy Barriers to serving minors experiencing homelessness - a collection of resources for youth advocates

Interactive
Jun 29, 2022
National Network for Youth
In 2020 we launched a dedicated effort to learn more about legal issues surrounding unaccompanied minors experiencing homelessness.
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Report
Community:
Jun 27, 2022
We have an abundance of talent that is ready to reimagine early childhood and well-being in America for our youngest children and families, but we do not have an abundance of leadership experiences that nurture, propel, and position them as the dynamic leaders our country urgently needs. Leadership that reflects the full diversity and genius of our communities, sectors, identities, and lived experiences matters now more than ever. In Toward A More Equitable Tomorrow: A Landscape Analysis of Early Childhood Leadership, we uncover the essentials for future leadership investments that value and center equity—especially racial equity and inclusion—to surface new possibilities and equitable prosperity moving forward. Insights from stakeholders including state and federal cabinet directors, service providers, funders, and parents offer powerful perspectives to guide the future early childhood field, and guide those who seek to accelerate families’ well-being, educational success, and economic mobility. Ascend at the Aspen Institute is embracing this moment as a renewal, and also as a redoubling of our commitment to remake our systems and our society. This means centering children and families with a focus not simply on eliminating persistent inequities such as poverty, polarization, and racism, but on ensuring pathways to prosperity and well-being. With support from the Buffett Early Childhood Fund, David and Lucile Packard Foundation, and the Bezos Family Foundation, Ascend undertook a robust landscape analysis of the early childhood field. More than 80 leaders—from research, practice, policy, philanthropy, and families with young children—shared their insights for this report. It was augmented by a review of 20 mission-aligned leadership efforts. Our inquiry was grounded in an intentional focus on racial, economic, and gender equity; respect for the advances made; commitment to innovation; and an open mind to new approaches, possibilities, and power.

Authored by: Ascend at the Aspen Institute
Topics: Advocacy, Asset building, Child welfare, CLPHA, Early childhood, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Racial inequalities, Research, Supportive housing, Sustainability, Youth
Shared by Karina George on Jun 27, 2022

Toward a More Equitable Tomorrow: A Landscape Analysis of Early Childhood Leadership

Report
Jun 27, 2022
Ascend at the Aspen Institute
We have an abundance of talent that is ready to reimagine early childhood and well-being in America for our youngest children and families, but we do not have an abundance of leadership experiences that nurture, propel, and position them as the dynamic leaders our country urgently needs.
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Report
Community:
Jun 27, 2022
A robust research base indicates the importance of high quality early care and education in relation to a host of long term health, education, and employment outcomes. The concept of “quality” in these programs has been the focus of much attention and resources, particularly over the last decade. Most states have established definitions of quality through quality rating and improvement systems (QRIS) and allocated accompanying resources to support early care and education providers to progress toward higher levels of quality. Unfortunately, with few exceptions, definitions of “quality” have been sorely lacking attention to equity and to the unique experiences that disproportionately affect children from historically marginalized communities. This report addresses a fundamental content flaw in QRISs by operationalizing equity indicators. These indicators are grounded and organized by the CEP’s 14 priorities to advance equity in early care and education systems, published in a 2020 report, in partnership with eight national organizations. States can use these indicators to inform QRIS redesign efforts to advance equity and improve transparency for families.

Authored by: The Children's Equity Project (CEP)
Topics: Advocacy, CLPHA, Communications, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Metrics, Racial inequalities, Research, Supportive housing, Sustainability
Shared by Karina George on Jun 27, 2022

Equity is Quality and Quality is Equity: Operationalizing Equity in Quality Rating and Improvement Systems

Report
Jun 27, 2022
The Children's Equity Project (CEP)
A robust research base indicates the importance of high quality early care and education in relation to a host of long term health, education, and employment outcomes. The concept of “quality” in these programs has been the focus of much attention and resources, particularly over the last decade.
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Video
Community:
Jun 17, 2022
The Columbus Metropolitan Housing Authority (CMHA) has formed a partnership with the Healthcare Collaborative of Greater Columbus (HCGC) and their Central Ohio Pathways HUB to provide supportive services to all 14,000 CMHA-assisted households. HCGC’s HUB is a nationally certified program focused on addressing the Social Determinants of Health in an effort to improve health outcomes for at-risk populations. The HUB oversees 10 Care Coordination Agencies (CCAs) and their employed Community Health Workers (CHWs) to provide these services. The HUB contracts with Medicaid Managed Care Organizations, who provide payments to the HUB for services called Pathways delivered to their members.

Authored by:
Topics: Advocacy, Community development, Housing, Partnerships, Racial inequalities, Research, Supportive housing, Sustainability
Shared by Karina George on Jun 17, 2022

CLPHA Housing Is Summit 2022: A Sustainable Approach to Addressing the Social Determinants of Health

Video
Jun 17, 2022
The Columbus Metropolitan Housing Authority (CMHA) has formed a partnership with the Healthcare Collaborative of Greater Columbus (HCGC) and their Central Ohio Pathways HUB to provide supportive services to all 14,000 CMHA-assisted households.
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Report
Community:
Apr 11, 2022
Educators play an important role in supporting students' mental well-being. The pandemic has added incredible layers of stress for both adults and young people. Although educators can't control all the stressors and sources of trauma affecting them, they can foster healing and wellness in their classroom or program and work to remove the stigma around mental health concerns.

Authored by: First Book Research & Insights
Topics: Advocacy, Depression, Early childhood, Education, Health, Healthy homes, Literacy, Low-income, Mental health, Racial inequalities, Research, School-readiness, Youth
Shared by Stephanie Gray on Apr 11, 2022
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Publication
Community:
Oct 21, 2021
State and local policymakers are making consequential decisions about the treatment of race and racism in schools. It is crucial, right now, to slow down, consider the evidence from research and experience, and apply that knowledge to improve teaching about race and racism. Authored in partnership between the Aspen Institute Education & Society Program and Dr. Francesca López, Professor & Waterbury Chair of Equity Pedagogy at Penn State University, United We Learn looks at empirical research on teaching about race and racism, across more than 40 studies on child development, beliefs about academic ability, positive ethnic-racial identity, and sense of belonging.

Authored by: Aspen Institute
Topics: Education, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Kirsten Greenwell on Oct 22, 2021

United We Learn: Honoring America’s Racial and Ethnic Diversity In Education

Publication
Oct 21, 2021
Aspen Institute
State and local policymakers are making consequential decisions about the treatment of race and racism in schools. It is crucial, right now, to slow down, consider the evidence from research and experience, and apply that knowledge to improve teaching about race and racism.
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Research
Community:
Aug 5, 2019
CLPHA developed a general data sharing template that public housing authorities (PHAs) and their health partners can customize to suit their data sharing and collaboration needs. Please feel free to comment to share any uses/modifications your organization made to implement into a partnership.

Authored by:
Topics: Affordable Care Act, CLPHA, Community development, Cost effectiveness, Data sharing, Dental, Depression, Dual-eligibles, Funding, Health, Healthy homes, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Mental health, Metrics, MTW, Nutrition, Obesity, Partnerships, Place-based, Preventative care, Racial inequalities, Research, SAMHSA, Smoke-free, Stability, Substance abuse, Supportive housing, Sustainability, TA
Shared by Steve Lucas on Aug 5, 2019

CLPHA Data Sharing Template for PHAs and Health Organizations

 

Disclaimer: This template is provided for informational purposes only and not for the purpose of providing legal advice. You should contact your attorney to obtain advice with respect to any particular issue or question. Use of this template, including its exhibits and attachments, does not create a relationship or any responsibilities between CLPHA and the user.

Research
Aug 5, 2019
CLPHA developed a general data sharing template that public housing authorities (PHAs) and their health partners can customize to suit their data sharing and collaboration needs. Please feel free to comment to share any uses/modifications your organization made to implement into a partnership.
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Video
Community:
Jun 3, 2019
On June 3, Governance Studies at Brookings cohosted an event with Contexts Magazine, featuring an expert panel that discussed the causes, consequences, and policy solutions to the racial wealth gap.

Authored by: The Brookings Institution
Topics: Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Jun 11, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Jun 4, 2019
A new study finds that higher percentages of wealthy, Asian, and white residents live in HOAs; and people pay a premium of about 4 percent for homes in HOAs.

Authored by: David Montgomery for CityLab
Topics: Community development, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Jun 6, 2019
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Video
Community:
May 24, 2019
Dr. Camara Jones, a Senior Fellow at Morehouse School of Medicine and a past president of the American Public Health Association, will discuss systemic, historical inequities that constrict the social safety net and ways cross-sector collaboration can help improve health outcomes, educational attainment, and housing stability.

Authored by: Housing Is, CLPHA
Topics: Health, Housing, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Housing Is on May 24, 2019
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Research
Community:
Mar 14, 2019
Despite abundant evidence about the effect of children’s socioeconomic circumstances on their transition to adulthood, we know much less about the effect of social policy programs aimed at poor families with children in facilitating how and when children become adults. This issue is particularly important for the U.S. federal subsidized housing program given its long history of placing subsidized units in some of the poorest and most racially segregated neighborhoods. Using counterfactual causal methods that adjust for the length of receipt of subsidized housing, I estimate the effect of subsidized housing on teenage parenthood, household formation, and educational attainment. I find that the subsidized housing program has either null or positive effects on the transition to adulthood and that these effects vary by both race and gender. These results underscore the importance of considering whether social programs have differential effects on the life chances of individuals based on both race and gender.

Authored by: Yana Kucheva for Demography
Topics: Homelessness, Housing, Racial inequalities, Research, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on May 20, 2019
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Report
Community:
May 15, 2019
Where you live is linked to how healthy you are.Sadly, U.S. Latino communities are marked by lower-quality, unaffordable housing, as well as high risk for eviction and displacement. This contributes to health inequities in this population. That’s what we found in our new research review, The State of Latinos and Housing, Transportation, and Green Space, released on May 14, 2019, by my team at Salud America!, a national network for health equity at UT Health San Antonio.

Authored by: Amelie Ramirez for Salud America!, UT Health San Antonio and the National Low Income Housing Coalition
Topics: Health, Housing, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Housing Is on May 15, 2019

The Dire State of Latino Housing (and How to Deal with It)

Report
May 15, 2019
Amelie Ramirez for Salud America!, UT Health San Antonio and the National Low Income Housing Coalition
Where you live is linked to how healthy you are.Sadly, U.S. Latino communities are marked by lower-quality, unaffordable housing, as well as high risk for eviction and displacement. This contributes to health inequities in this population.
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Report
Community:
In fact, Syracuse’s experience feels both unique and all too common for U.S. cities, particularly Great Lakes cities: federally sanctioned housing disinvestment; sprawling outward development; stagnating or declining and segregated population; fractured local government and school systems; and outdated infrastructure.

Authored by: Anthony Armstrong & Make Communities for The Poverty and Race Research Action Council (PRRAC)
Topics: Community development, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Housing Is on May 10, 2019
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Publication
Community:
May 1, 2019
Focusing on traditional neighborhood measures such as disadvantage and segregation rarely reveals how specific policies, powerful decisionmakers, and institutions built on racial hierarchy generate and maintain racial health disparities. To help researchers, policymakers, and practitioners consider how best to recognize and incorporate structural racism in the study of place-based health disparities, this literature review highlights four lessons researchers can use to more directly study the connection between structural racism and health.

Authored by: How Housing Matters for The Urban Institute
Topics: Health, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Housing Is on May 2, 2019

Four Ways to Integrate a Structural Racism Lens into Neighborhood Health Research

Publication
May 1, 2019
How Housing Matters for The Urban Institute
Focusing on traditional neighborhood measures such as disadvantage and segregation rarely reveals how specific policies, powerful decisionmakers, and institutions built on racial hierarchy generate and maintain racial health disparities.
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Report
Community:
As the United States rapidly becomes both a more diverse and unequal nation, policymakers face the urgent challenge of confronting growing wealth gaps by race and ethnicity. To create a more equitable and secure future, we must shift away from public policies that fuel and exacerbate racial disparities in wealth. But which policies can truly begin to reduce our country’s expanding racial divergences?

Authored by: Demos and The Institute on Assets and Social Policy (IASP)
Topics: Housing, Legislation & Policy, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 26, 2019
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Research
Community:
May 18, 2018
Parent involvement is associated with child academic outcomes, positive behaviors, and social skills. This qualitative study explored school-based parent involvement barriers experienced by nine low-income mothers. In-depth interviews were used to collect data from mothers participating in a community-based program offered in a large public housing neighborhood. Findings included three main barriers: (a) cultural and language differences in their children’s school, (b) undertones of racism from teachers and parents, and (c) being the primary caregiver or sole provider for their children. Although all parents experience challenges to school involvement, low-income mothers face additional obstacles preventing them from engaging in their children’s schools. This perceived lack of school involvement can lead to feelings of helplessness, shame, and stigma.

Authored by: Stephanie Lechuga-Pena and Daniel Brisson for TQR
Topics: Education, Family engagement, Housing, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 25, 2019

Barriers to School-Based Parent Involvement While Living in Public Housing: A Mother's Perspective

Research
May 18, 2018
Stephanie Lechuga-Pena and Daniel Brisson for TQR
Parent involvement is associated with child academic outcomes, positive behaviors, and social skills. This qualitative study explored school-based parent involvement barriers experienced by nine low-income mothers.
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Research
Community:
Nov 27, 2018
A growing body of research suggests that housing eviction is more common than previously recognized and may play an important role in the reproduction of poverty. The proportion of children affected by housing eviction, however, remains largely unknown. We estimate that one in seven children born in large U.S. cities in 1998–2000 experienced at least one eviction for nonpayment of rent or mortgage between birth and age 15. Rates of eviction were substantial across all cities and demographic groups studied, but children from disadvantaged backgrounds were most likely to experience eviction. Among those born into deep poverty, we estimate that approximately one in four were evicted by age 15. Given prior evidence that forced moves have negative consequences for children, we conclude that the high prevalence and social stratification of housing eviction are sufficient to play an important role in the reproduction of poverty and warrant greater policy attention.

Authored by: Ian Lundberg and Louis Donnelly
Topics: Early childhood, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 18, 2019

A Research Note on the Prevalance of Housing Eviction Among Children Born in U.S. Cities

Research
Nov 27, 2018
Ian Lundberg and Louis Donnelly
A growing body of research suggests that housing eviction is more common than previously recognized and may play an important role in the reproduction of poverty. The proportion of children affected by housing eviction, however, remains largely unknown.
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News Article
Community:
Feb 26, 2019
More than half of students in the U.S. go to segregated or "racially concentrated" schools, according to the report. Those are schools in which more than three-quarters of students are white, or more than three-quarters are nonwhite. Researchers found that high-poverty districts serving mostly students of color receive about $1,600 less per student than the national average. That's while school districts that are predominately white and poor receive about $130 less.

Authored by: Clare Lombardo for NPR
Topics: Education, Funding, Legislation & Policy, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 4, 2019
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Research
Community:
Feb 1, 2019
The authors draw on interviews with 50 families in Cleveland and its suburbs to uncover their experiences in choosing a home and school for their children in the suburbs. Nearly all families were seeking the “package deal”— good schools in good neighborhoods — and looked to the suburbs to find it. Families were often convinced of the superior quality of suburban schools but, owing to the legacies of enduring structural racism and emerging segregation in the suburbs, Black families were more likely to be disappointed in their suburban schools than their white counterparts. Families of color were also constrained by the legacies of enduring structural racism that has reproduced racial inequalities.

Authored by: Anna Rhodes and Siri Warkentien for How Housing Matters Research (MacArthur Foundation)
Topics: Education, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 28, 2019

Even As The Suburbs Diversify, Racial Inequality Persists in Suburban Schools

Research
Feb 1, 2019
Anna Rhodes and Siri Warkentien for How Housing Matters Research (MacArthur Foundation)
The authors draw on interviews with 50 families in Cleveland and its suburbs to uncover their experiences in choosing a home and school for their children in the suburbs. Nearly all families were seeking the “package deal”— good schools in good neighborhoods — and looked to the suburbs to find it.
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Publication
Community:
The Home Preservation Initiative (HPI) for Healthy Living seeks to improve asthma outcomes related to unhealthy housing in five neighborhoods in West Philadelphia. By combining home repairs and community health worker home visits, HPI aims to significantly reduce emergency department visits and hospitalizations due to pediatric asthma. For these primarily African-American communities, substandard housing, unemployment, low wages and a lack of education are barriers to the overall health and well-being of residents. Using outcome data, the collaboration will show health care cost savings, aiming to make a strong case for Medicaid reimbursement for home repairs.

Authored by: The BUILD Health Challenge
Topics: Asthma, Cost effectiveness, Data sharing, East Coast, Health, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Partnerships, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 19, 2019
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Publication
Community:
Jan 30, 2019
Understanding health disparity causes is an important first step toward developing policies or interventions to eliminate disparities, but their nature makes identifying and addressing their causes challenging.

Authored by: Mathematica Policy Research
Topics: Health, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 18, 2019
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Interactive
Community:
The NQP Social Determinants of Health Data Integration Action Team brings together experts and recognized leaders from the private and public sectors committed to accelerating the integration of data on social determinants of health (SDOH) into clinical practice. Through a series of web meetings and one in-person forum, the NQP Social Determinants of Health Data Integration Action Team Action Team will develop and share successful approaches to integrating SDOH data to support providers and communities in their efforts to eliminate disparities.

Authored by: National Quality Forum
Topics: Data sharing, Health, Partnerships, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 18, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Mar 5, 2019
Disasters are becoming more common in America. In the early and mid-20th century, fewer than 20 percent of U.S. counties experienced a disaster each year. Today, it's about 50 percent. According to the 2018 National Climate Assessment, climate change is already driving more severe droughts, floods and wildfires in the U.S. And those disasters are expensive. The federal government spends billions of dollars annually helping communities rebuild and prevent future damage. But an NPR investigation has found that across the country, white Americans and those with more wealth often receive more federal dollars after a disaster than do minorities and those with less wealth. Federal aid isn't necessarily allocated to those who need it most; it's allocated according to cost-benefit calculations meant to minimize taxpayer risk.

Authored by: Rebecca Hersher and Robert Benincasa for NPR
Topics: Community development, Funding, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Research, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Mar 7, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Feb 23, 2019
Gerrymandered school boundaries and greater transportation costs are the trade-off school districts must make in order to achieve racial integration and close the racial achievement gap, said a researcher from the Urban Institute.

Authored by: Roger McKinney for Columbia Daily Tribune
Topics: Child welfare, Education, Legislation & Policy, Racial inequalities, Research, Transportation
Shared by Housing Is on Feb 28, 2019